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  1. 1
    272260

    New WHO data on a progestin-releasing vaginal ring.

    OUTLOOK. 1990 Jun; 8(2):7-9.

    This article summarizes the most recent data on WHO's multicenter clinical trial test of the low dose progestin-releasing vaginal ring as an effective contraceptive for women. The study involved 1005 women aged 19-34 and was carried out from 1980-86 at 19 centers in 13 countries, including 9 developing countries. The overall findings on vaginal ring use included: the ring's effectiveness was comparable to oral contraceptive (OC) effectiveness, pregnancy rates increased with increasing body weight, about 1/2 of the users had discontinued the ring by 1 year, the ring disrupted menstrual bleeding patterns in about 1/2 of all users, and about 1/4 of all users expelled the ring at least once but most continued to use it. The irregular bleeding pattern was the main reason for discontinuation. Part of the reason for having different ring contraceptive effectiveness in different countries could be due to differing average weights of the women. Increasing risk of expulsion was directly related to increasing age by approximately 3% with each year of age. For effective use of 90-day low-dose levonorgestrel-releasing vaginal ring, appropriate clients should have the following: a dislike for inserting and removing vaginal devices, low weight, counselling on potentially irregular bleeding, and counseling on how to deal with an expulsion. (author's modified)
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  2. 2
    048018

    Evaluating progress.

    Roy L

    WORLD HEALTH. 1988 Jan-Feb; 10-11.

    In 1979 WHO invited its member states to participate in a global strategy for health and to monitor and evaluate its effectiveness using a minimum of 12 indicators. Members' 1982 implementation reports and 1985 evaluation reports form the basis for evaluating each measure. Indicators 1-6 have strong political and economic components in both developed and developing countries and are not complete. Indicator 7, for which rates of reply are satisfactory, asks whether at least 5 elements of primary health care are available to the whole population. The 8th gauge seeks information on the nutritional status of children, considering birth weight (a possible indicator of risk) and weight for age (a monitor of growth). Infant mortality rate and life expectancy at birth, indicators 9 and 10, are difficult to estimate in developing countries, and health services are not always kept informed of current estimates. Indicator 11 asks whether the literacy rate exceeds 70%; it can provide information on level of development and should emphasize literacy for women, for whom health information is critical. The last global measure yields information about the gross national product, which is not always the most recent, despite the trend of countries to publish their gross domestic product. Failure to make use of the best national sources, such as this, is one of several problems encountered by WHO's member states in collecting accurate data. Other problems include lack of universally acceptable definitions, different national accounting systems, disinterest of health authorities in economic matters, lack of staff, lack of financial resources in developing countries, and inadequately structured health system management. Each country must choose the most appropriate methods for collection of data. If an indicator cannot be calculated, the country is encouraged to seek and devise a substitute. WHO must produce more precise and reliable indicators. It must respond to requests for ways of improving or strengthening national systems.
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