Your search found 47 Results

  1. 1
    333071

    Population aging: Is Latin America ready?

    Cotlear D

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 2011. [324] p. (Directions in Development)

    The past half-century has seen enormous changes in the demographic makeup of Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). In the 1950s, LAC had a small population of about 160 million people, less than today's population of Brazil. Two-thirds of Latin Americans lived in rural areas. Families were large and women had one of the highest fertility rates in the world, low levels of education, and few opportunities for work outside the household. Investments in health and education reached only a small fraction of the children, many of whom died before reaching age five. Since then, the size of the LAC population has tripled and the mostly rural population has been transformed into a largely urban population. There have been steep reductions in child mortality, and investments in health and education have increased, today reaching a majority of children. Fertility has been more than halved and the opportunities for women in education and for work outside the household have improved significantly. Life expectancy has grown by 22 years. Less obvious to the casual observer, but of significance for policy makers, a population with a large fraction of dependent children has evolved into a population with fewer dependents and a very large proportion of working-age adults. This overview seeks to introduce the reader to three groups of issues related to population aging in LAC. First is a group of issues related to the support of the aging and poverty in the life cycle. Second is the question of the health transition. Third is an understanding of the fiscal pressures that are likely to accompany population aging and to disentangle the role of demography from the role of policy in that process.
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  2. 2
    303857

    The challenge of HIV / AIDS.

    Brown MM

    Choices. 2001 Dec; 4.

    We are facing the most devastating global epidemic in modern history. Over 60 million people have been infected. In the worst affected countries one in four adults are now living with HIV/AIDS, a disproportionate number of younger women and girls. More than 80 percent are in their twenties. The result is a devastating hollowing out of communities, leaving only the very young and the very old and thrusting millions of families deeper into poverty. Meeting this challenge means progress on three fronts: first, preventing new infections and reversing the spread of the epidemic; second, expanding equitable access to new HIV treatments; third, alleviating the disastrous impact of AIDS on human development. Effectively responding to HIV/AIDS requires a wide range of initiatives under strong national political leadership, including sex education in schools, public awareness campaigns, programmes in the workplace, mobilization of religious and community leaders, action to mitigate the impact on poverty and essential social services, support for orphans and tough policy decisions in ministries of finance to ensure optimal allocation of resources to cope with the crisis. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    139618

    World population prospects: the 1992 revision. Annex tables.

    United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    [Unpublished] 1992. [136] p.

    This report presents the 1992 revision of the UN world population projections to 2025 for its high, medium, and low variants and supplemental statistical data (fertility, infant death, birth, death rates; life expectancy; and dependency ratio. Data is tabulated for each of 240 countries of the world, regional totals, and world totals. Statistics are provided quinquennially during 1960-95 with projections quinquennially during 2000-25. Statistics give population size and annual rate of change.
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  4. 4
    083302

    Population projections for Mongolia: 1989-2019.

    Neupert RF

    ASIA-PACIFIC POPULATION JOURNAL. 1992 Dec; 7(4):61-80.

    The State Statistical Office with the support of UNDESD and UNFPA prepared 3 projections. A standard cohort component method was used to project populations by sex and 5-year age groups for each quinquennium between 1989 and 2019. 3 hypotheses were proposed. In Hypothesis 1, fertility was assumed to stabilize at a level of a TFR of 3.5 children per woman. In Hypothesis 3, fertility was assumed to decline up to the period 1990-2004 and up to the replacement level (2.23 children per woman during that period). Hypothesis 2 represents an intermediate situation between Hypothesis 1 and 3 which was considered as the most plausible future trend of fertility. According to Projection 2 the population of Mongolia will be almost 3.8 million in the year 2019. Projections 1 and 3 give total populations of 4.2 and 3.5 million, respectively. The difference between a TFR of 2.2 and 3.5 for the last quinquennium of the projection period resulted in a difference of around 700,000 people. The difference between Projections 1 and 2 is about 400,000 people. Considering the fertility assumptions adopted for these projections, it is not very likely that the size of the population at the turn of the century will be much smaller than 2.6 million or larger than 3 million. What is more uncertain is the scenario for the 2nd decade of next century. During the next 2 decades, the growth will become gradually more moderate. The main changes will be an increase in the proportion of the population between 15 and 64 years of age, a decline in the proportion of the young population of the young population resulting in a substantial decrease of the dependency ratio and an increase in the median age of the population. According to the 3 hypotheses, the young population will continue growing, albeit at a slower pace. There will be a decline in the proportion of young to old people and an increase in the proportion of the population in the working age groups. Yet, all age groups will continue to increase in absolute terms. International migration may produce some deviations in this expected profile.
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  5. 5
    082184

    Europe and Central Asia Region, Middle East and North Africa Region, population projections, 1992-93 edition.

    Vu MT; Bos E; Levin A

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, Population and Human Resources Dept., 1992 Nov. xcv, 203 p. (Policy Research Working Papers WPS 1016)

    Statistical information and a summary introduction were provided for Eastern Europe and Europe, Central Asia and the Middle East, and North African regions for selected demographic and economic measures. Measures included income, birth and death rates, fertility rates, rate of natural increase, net migration rate, growth rate, infant mortality rate, dependency ratio, and population projections to 2150. Detailed age and sex distributions were also provided. Both World Bank and nonborrower countries were included. The figures were updated from the 1990-91 Edition. The summary described and discussed recent demographic trends and future projections, and reviewed countries and regions by income level. Noteworthy changes by country were indicated. World Bank borrower countries were divided into the following regions: sub-Saharan Africa, East Asia and the Pacific, South Asia, Europe and Central Asia, Middle East and North Africa, and Latin America and the Caribbean, which were regrouped into 4-6 country departments and into 4 income groups. The largest population was in East Asia and the Pacific with 30% of world population. Other large regions included South Asia with 21%, Africa with 10%, Europe and Central Asia with 9%, Latin America and the Caribbean with 8%, and the Middle East and North Africa with 5%. Country departments reflected the regions as a whole, with the exception of sub-Saharan Africa with growth rates of 32.% to 2.8%. East Africa had the highest rates and Sahelian and South African countries the lowest rates. The Middle Eastern countries had rates of 3.0% in contrast to North African countries rates of 2.7%. Diversity was greatest in Asian departments. Rates were 2.0-2.6% in South Asia and 1.9-1.4% in East Asian and Pacific departments. The lowest rates were in European and Central Asian departments. In 1992, less developed countries comprised 77% of the world population. The projections indicated that by 2150 the population would reach 12.2 billion, of which 88% would live in developing countries. The 1992 projections differed from 1990-91's in that the projections were revised downward due to AIDS mortality. World fertility was projected to decline from 3.2 now to 2.9 by 2000 and 2.4 by 2025. Life expectancy was expected to reach 70 years in about 2010. The proportion aged would rise in more developed countries.
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  6. 6
    074860

    World population projections, 1989-90 edition: short-and long-term estimates.

    Bulatao RA; Bos E; Stephens PW; Vu MT

    Baltimore, Maryland, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1990. lxxiii, 421 p.

    The World Bank's Population and Human Resources Department regularly publishes a set of world population projections based on its data files. This 1989-90 report has projections for the world and for regions, income groups of countries, and 187 countries. World Bank staff made projections to the point where populations reach stability. In almost all cases, they made only 1 projection. Projection tables for 1985-2030 exist for each country's population. Each country also has tables on birth rate, death rate, net migration, natural increase, population growth, total fertility rate, life expectancy, infant mortality rate, and dependency ratio. The report shows that from 1985-90 population growth was 1.74%, and projected 1990 world population size was 5.3 billion. By 2025, 84.1% of the world's population will be living in developing countries. 58% of the population now lives in Asia. The population of Africa is growing faster than that of Asia, however, (3 vs. 1.9%). By 2000, the population of Africa will be second only to that of Asia, yet in 1989-1990, it is behind that of Asia, Europe and the USSR, and the Americas. The current dependency ratio (67) is expected to decline to 53 by 2025. The highest current dependency ratio belongs to Kenya (120). In developed countries with aging populations, the dependency ratio will rise from 50-58. China will most likely to continue to be the most populous country for about 200 years. India will continue to contribute more to population growth than any other country in the world. Yet the Federal Republic of Germany loses 100,000 people yearly. Total fertility rates are the greatest in Rwanda, the Yemen Arab Republic, Kenya, Malawi, and the Ivory Coast (all >7.2). Afghanistan and 3 western African countries have the shortest life expectancies (about 40 years). These trends illustrate the need to alter population growth.
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  7. 7
    076548

    1991 ESCAP population data sheet.

    United Nations. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific [ESCAP]. Population Division

    Bangkok, Thailand, ESCAP, Population Division, 1991. [1] p.

    The 1991 Population Data Sheet produced by the UN Economic and social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) provides a large chart by country and region for Asia and the Pacific for the following variables: mid-1991 population, average annual growth rate, crude birth rate, crude death rate, total fertility rate, infant mortality rate, male life expectancy at birth, female life expectancy at birth, % aged 0-14 years, % aged 65 and over, dependency ratios, density, % urban, and population projection at 2010. 3 charts also display urban and rural population trends between 1980 and 2025, the crude birth and death rates and rate of natural increase by region, and dependency ratios for 27 countries.
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  8. 8
    071958

    New Zealand.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 206-9. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    New Zealand's 1985 population of 3,318,000 is projected to grow to 4,202,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 24.1% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 14.6% were over the age of 60. 17.9% and 23.1% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 7.4 to 1.8 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 73.8 to 77.5 years, the crude death rate will increase from 8.4 to 10.2, while infant mortality will decline from 12.1 to 6.1. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 1.9 to 1.8, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 15.7 to 11.9. The 1976 contraceptive prevalence rate was 41.0, while the 1981 female mean age at 1st marriage was 22.7 years. Urban population will increase from 83.7% in 1985 to 87.8% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, immigration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while high emigration is not. New Zealand does not have an explicit population policy. Demographic variables have, however, been influenced by policies toward the family, health care, and immigration. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  9. 9
    071957

    Netherlands.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 202-5. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Netherlands' 1985 population of 14,500,000 is projected to grow to 14,691,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 19.6% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 16.5% were over the age of 60. 15.1% and 30.1% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 3.8 to -2.7 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 76.0 to 78.2 years, the crude death rate will increase from 8.7 to 13.0, while infant mortality will decline from 8.3 to 5.2. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.6 to 1.9, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 12.5 to 10.4. The 1985 contraceptive prevalence rate was 72.0, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 23.2 years. Urban population will increase from 88.4% in 1985 to 89.6% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while high immigration and low emigration are not. The Netherlands has an explicit population policy. Fertility should be 15-30% below replacement level over several years in order to stop population growth, the level of immigration should be restricted, and a stationary population should ultimately be smaller than that presently realized. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  10. 10
    071947

    Malta.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 162-5. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Malta's 1985 population of 383,000 is projected to grow to 459,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 23.9% of the population was ages 0-14 years, while 13.8% were over the age of 60. 19.5% and 23.7% are projected to be in these prospective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 7.3 to 1.8 over the period. Life expectancy should increase fROm 71.7 to 76.9 years, the crude death rate will increase from 10.1 to 11.2, while infant mortality will decline from 12.9 to 6.6. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 2.0 to 2.1, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 17.4 to 13.0. Urban population will increase from 85.3% in 1985 to 92.4% overall by the year 2025. All levels and trends are considered to be acceptable by the government. In turn, Malta does not have an explicit population policy. Despite the lack of governmental intervention to influence the birth rate, the government recognizes the need keep rates low. Population policy as it related to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  11. 11
    071950

    Mexico.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 174-7. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Mexico's 1985 population of 78,996,000 is projected to grow to 154,085,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 42.2% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 5.4% were over the age of 60. 24.8% and 11.6% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 26.8 to 11.3 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 65.7 to 73.2 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 7.1 to 6.4, while infant mortality will decline from 53.0 to 22.2. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 4.6 to 2.3, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 33.9 to 17.7. The 1982 contraceptive prevalence rate was 48.0, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 20.6 years. Urban population will increase from 69.6% in 1985 to 84.4% overall by the year 2025. Morbidity, mortality, immigration, and emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, fertility, and spatial distribution are not. Mexico has an explicit population policy. Integrated with development plans, policy aims to reduce population growth largely by reducing fertility. Attention is also given to adjusting spatial distribution, and improving women's status, the quality of life, and social equity. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  12. 12
    071949

    Mauritius.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 170-3. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Mauritius' 1985 population of 1,050,000 is projected to grow to 1,606,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 31.6% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 5.7% were over the age of 60. 21.2% and 17.8% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 19.5 to 5.9 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 66.7 to 74/2 years, the crude death rate will increase from 6.0 to 8.6, while infant mortality will decline from 28.4 to 8.5. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 2.8 to 2.1, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 25.5 to 14.5. The 1985 contraceptive prevalence rate was 75.0, while the 1983 female mean age at 1st marriage was 21.7 years. Urban population will increase from 42.2% in 1985 to 62.7% overall by the year 2025. Insignificant immigration is considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, emigration, and spatial distribution are not. Mauritius has an explicit population policy. It aims to decrease population growth by reducing fertility. Specific efforts include providing family planning services, improving women's status, and increasing females' minimum marriage age from 15 to 18 years. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  13. 13
    071904

    Iran (Islamic Republic of).

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 70-3. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Iran's 1985 population of 44,632,000 is projected to grow to 97,011,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 42.7% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 5.1% were over the age of 60. 25.3% and 10.2% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 28.8 to 11.8 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 57.3 to 72.0 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 12.0 to 6.0, while infant mortality will decline from 115.0 to 38.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 5.6 to 2.2, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 40.8 to 17.8. The 1978-79 contraceptive prevalence rate was 23.0, while the 1976 female mean age at 1st marriage was 19.7 years. Urban population will increase from 51.9% in 1985 to 74.6% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, fertility, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while morbidity, mortality immigration, and emigration are not. Iran does not have an explicit population policy. The government instead finds balanced growth to be of greater concern than fertility control in solving the country's economic and social problems. Reduced immigration and emigration, and a modified population distribution are, however, sought. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  14. 14
    071903

    Indonesia.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 66-9. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Indonesia's 1985 population of 166,440,000 is projected to grow to 272,744,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 38.7% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 5.6% were over the age of 60. 22.6% and 13.1% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 19.5 to 8.0 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 53.5 to 70.8 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 12.6 to 7.9, while infant mortality will decline from 84.4 to 26.2. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 4.1 to 2.0, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 32.1 to 15.9. the 1985 contraceptive prevalence rate was 38.0, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 20.0 years. Urban population will increase from 25.3% in 1985 to 55.9% overall by the year 2025. Immigration and emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, and spatial distribution are not. Indonesia has an explicit population policy. Central objectives include reducing fertility and population growth, readjusting population distribution, and improving employment opportunities and living conditions. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  15. 15
    071902

    India.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 62-5. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    India's 1985 population of 758,927,000 is projected to grow to 1,228,829,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 36.8% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 6.8% were over the age of 60. 21.3% and 14.4% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 19.4 to 7.0 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 55.4 to 71.6 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 12.3 to 7.7, while infant mortality will decline from 110.3 to 34.5. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 4.3 to 1.9, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 31.7 to 14.8. The 1980 contraceptive prevalence rate was 34.0, while the 1981 female mean age at 1st marriage was 18.7 years. Urban population will increase from 25.5% in 1985 to 53.6% overall by the year 2025. Immigration, emigration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, morbidity, mortality, and fertility are not. India has an explicit population policy. To reduce population growth, policy aims to reduce fertility, morbidity, and mortality, foster social and economic advancement through industrial, agricultural, and rural development programs. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  16. 16
    071901

    Iceland.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 58-61. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Iceland's 1985 population of 243,000 is projected to grow to 304, 000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 26.6% of the population was aged 0.14 years, while 13.8% were over the age of 60. 18.0% and 23.7% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 12.3 to 2.3 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 76.8 to 78.3 years, the crude death rate will increase from 7.2 to 9.6, while infant mortality will decline from 6.4 to 5.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 2.4 to 1.9, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 19.5 to 11.9. The 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 23.8 years. Urban population will increase from 89.4% in 1985 to 93.3% overall by the year 2025. All levels and trends are considered to be acceptable by the government. Iceland does not have an explicit population policy. Concern is instead focused upon improving rural health services. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  17. 17
    071900

    Hungary.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 54-7. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Hungary's 1985 population of 10,697,000 is projected to shrink to 10,598,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 21.6% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 18.2% were over the age of 60. 71.8% and 24.2% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from-0.3 to -0.6 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 70.3 to 76.4 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 13.1 to 12.9, while infant mortality will decline from 20.1 to 7.0. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.9 to 2.0, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 12.9 to 12.3. The 1986 contraceptive prevalence rate was 73.0, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 21.0 years. Urban population will increase from 56.2% in 1985 to 67.5% overall by the year 2025. Immigration, emigration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, morbidity, mortality, and fertility are not. Hungary has an explicit population policy. It hopes to increase population growth by increasing fertility and improving living conditions. Additionally, changes are sought in population age structure, mortality, and overall health status of the population. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  18. 18
    071897

    Guyana.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 42-5. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Guyana's 1985 population of 953,000 is projected to grow to 1,562000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 37.0% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 6.0% were over the age of 60. 21.7% and 16.4% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 22.6 to 8.3 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 68.2 to 75.9 years, the crude death rate will increase from 5.9 to 6.6, while infant mortality will decline from 36.2 to 11.9. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 3.3 to 2.1, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 28.5 to 14.8. The 1975 contraceptive prevalence rate was 31.0, while the 1980/81 female mean age at 1st marriage was 20.7 years. Urban population will increase from 32.2% in 1985 to 60.5% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, morbidity, and fertility are considered to be acceptable by the government, while immigration, emigration, and spatial distribution are not. Guyana has an explicit population policy. In addition to generally improving the population's health and welfare, efforts aim to stem emigration from rural areas by fostering agricultural development. some concerns have been voiced which suggest that the population may be too small. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  19. 19
    071892

    Greece.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 22-5. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Greece's 1985 population of 9,878,000 is projected to grow to 10,789,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 21.5% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 17.8% were over the age of 60. 18.6% and 23.8% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 4.8 to 0.9 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 74.0 to 77.7 years, the crude death rate will increase from 10.1 to 11.6, while infant mortality will decline from 16.2 to 8.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 2.2 to 2.0, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 14.9 to 12.5. Urban population will increase from 60.1% in 1985 to 79.1% overall by the year 2025. Spatial distribution, in part, and insignificant emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, and immigration are not. Greece has an explicit population policy. The government hopes to increase fertility, population growth, and improve the quality of health care. Specifically, policy aims to remove disincentives to procreation through the betterment of social services and the quality of life. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  20. 20
    071893

    Grenada.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 26-9. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Grenada's 1985 population of 112,000 is projected to grow to 185,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 10% of the population was over the age of 60, while the rate of natural increase was 21.0. The crude death rate was 8.0, infant mortality 13.0, and crude birth rate 29.0. Immigration and emigration are considered to acceptable by the government, while population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, and spatial distribution are not. Grenada does not have an explicit population policy. High fertility and mortality may, however, be reduced as a result of official attention upon providing basic services in the areas of health, housing, education, water, food, and employment. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  21. 21
    069179

    Interview: Mr. George Walmsley: UNFPA Country Director for the Philippines.

    ASIA-PACIFIC POPIN BULLETIN. 1991 Jun; 3(2):7-11.

    George Walmsley, UNFPA country director for the Philippines, discusses demographic and economic conditions in the Philippines, and present plans to revitalize the national population program after 20 years of only modest achievements. The Philippines is a rapidly growing country with much poverty, unemployment and underemployment, uneven population distribution, and a large, highly dependent segment of children and youths under age 15. Initial thrusts of the population program were in favor of fertility reduction, ultimately changing to adopt a perspective more attuned to promoting overall family welfare. Concurrent with this change also came a shift from a clinic-based to community-based approach. Fertility declines have nonetheless grown weaker over the past 8-10 years. A large gap exists between family planning knowledge and practice, with contraceptive prevalence rates declining from 45% in 1986 to 36% in 1988. Behind this lackluster performance are a lack of consistent political support, discontinuities in program implementation, a lack of coordination among participating agencies, and obstacles to program implementation at the field level. The present government considers the revitalization of this program a priority concern. Mr. Walmsley discusses UNFPA's definition of a priority country, and what that means for the Philippines in terms of resources nd future activities. He further responds to questions about the expected effect of the Catholic church upon program implementation and success, non-governmental organization involvement, the role of information and information systems in the program, the relationship between population, environment and sustainable development, and the status of women and its effect on population.
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  22. 22
    070217

    Uruguay.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 198-201. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Uruguay's 1985 population of 3,012,000 is projected to grow to 3,875,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 26.9% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 15.3% were over the age of 60. 22.1% and 17.4% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 9.3 to 5.2 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 70.3 to 73.4 years, the crude death rate will remain constant at 10.2, and infant mortality will decline from 30.0 to 16.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 2.8 to 2.2, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 19.5 to 15.4. No information is reported on the contraceptive prevalence rate, while the 1975 female mean age at 1st marriage was 22.4 years. Urban population will increase from 84.6% in 1985 to 91.6% overall by the year 2025. Mortality and morbidity are considered to be acceptable by the government, while low population growth, fertility, immigration, high emigration, and spatial distribution are not. Uruguay has an explicit population policy. It aims to increase population growth, fertility, and immigration, while reducing morbidity, mortality, and emigration. Return migration is also encouraged. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  23. 23
    070216

    United States of America.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 194-7. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    The United States of America's 1985 population of 239,283,000 is projected to grow to 300,796,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 21.7% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 16.5% were over the age of 60. 18.1% and 26.3% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will declined from 7.1 to 2.1 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 74.5 to 79.7 years, the crude death rate will increase from 8.6 to 9.8, while infant mortality will decline from 11.0 to 5.0. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.8 to 2.0, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 15.7 to 11.9. The 1982 contraceptive prevalence rate was 68.0, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 23.3 years. Urban population will increase from 73.9% in 1985 to 77.0% overall by the year 2025. All of these indicators and trends are considered to be acceptable by the government. The United States of America, therefore, does not have an explicit population policy. The government intervenes only to love mortality and morbidity, and to regulate the flow of immigration. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken regarding the above-mentioned demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  24. 24
    070214

    United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 186-9. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland's 1985 population of 56,618,000 is projected to grow to 57,464,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 19.2% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 20.7% were over the age of 60. 17.2% and 27.5% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 1.3 to -0.1 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 74.0 to 79.6 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 11.7 to 11.5, while infant mortality will decline from 11.0 to 5.0. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.8 to 1.9, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 13.0 to 11.4. The 1983 contraceptive prevalence rate was 83, while the 1981 female mean age at 1st marriage was 22.8 years. Urban population will increase from 91.7% in 1985 to 95.8% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, fertility, spatial distribution, and low emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while mortality and high immigration are not. The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland does not have an explicit population policy. Recent legislation has, however, been enacted to stem the flow of immigrants into the country. The government considers decisions on fertility and child-bearing best left to individuals and limits itself to providing family planning and health information and services. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  25. 25
    070211

    Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 174-7. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Based upon data for the year 1985, the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic's population was 51,300,000. The rate of natural increase was 4.5, and crude death and birth rates were 11.1 and 15.5, respectively. 66.4% of the population resided in urban areas. No more detailed data were presented on population age structure and growth, mortality, morbidity, fertility, international migration, and spatial distribution. Likewise, no demographic statistics were projected for the year 2025. Population growth, fertility, international migration, and spatial distribution are nonetheless considered to be acceptable by the government, while mortality is not. The Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic has an explicit population policy. Increasing life expectancy and labor force activity, strengthening the family, improving education for the young, and changing the role and participation of women in the work force and public domain are policy objectives. The government encourages women to bear children, and generally hopes to maintain and potentially increase the rate of population growth. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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