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Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    188301

    Country profiles for population and reproductive health: policy developments and indicators 2003.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]; Population Reference Bureau [PRB]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2003. iv, 345 p.

    This section outlines the objectives of the country’s formal population policy (if any), or of population-related components of its general development policies. Actions and other measures currently taken to implement these policies are also highlighted to illustrate the Government’s political will and priorities. These descriptions are based on various sources, including the biennial Population Policy Inquiries of the United Nations Population Division and the regular reports on country programme progress submitted to UNFPA. Each of the major subregions is introduced with an overview of common key issues. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    084559

    Pakistan, South Asia region.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    IPPF COUNTRY PROFILES. 1992 Aug; SAR 19-24.

    In 1984 in Pakistan, the government's Council of Islamic Ideology banned contraception unless pregnancy would jeopardize a woman's life. The government soon realized that its 2.9% population growth rate was too high to achieve social and economic development, so it implemented a national population policy, hoping to reduce population growth to 2.5% by 2000. The policy calls for a multisectoral approach, emphasizing mobile services to promote birth spacing and maternal and child health and providing family planning services through the public and private sector and family welfare centers. The policy also aims to increase literacy, reduce unemployment, and improve health care. It targets rural areas where 72% of the population lives. In 1989, only 9.1% of 15-49 year old married women used contraceptives and 58.6% wanted to control their fertility but did not have access to family planning information and services. Pakistan depends greatly on the family planning services of the nongovernmental organization. Family Planning Association of Pakistan (FPAP). FPAP introduced family welfare centers, social marketing, and reproductive health centers to Pakistan. It continues to introduce new contraceptives. FPAP's major projects include educational programs in population, family planning, and nutrition; family planning training; promotion of family planning and maternal and child health; programs emphasizing male involvement in family planning; information, education, and communication; and lobbying Parliament for more funding for family planning and for improvement in women's status.
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  3. 3
    077732

    Inventory of population projects in developing countries around the world, 1988/1989: multilateral organization assistance, regional organization assistance, bilateral agency assistance, non-governmental organization and other assistance.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, [1990]. [12], 932 p.

    The UNFPA periodically releases a publication listing population projects supported and/or operated by various organizations. This publication also has basic demographic data and each country's population policy. The 16th edition covers the period from January 1, 1988 to June 30, 1989. The first section reviews all the countries' programs and makes up the bulk of the publication. Each division in this section begins with demographic data, followed by the government's views about population growth, specifically as it affects mortality and morbidity; fertility, nuptiality, and family; spatial distribution and urbanization; international migration. Each division next examines the population projects and external assistance. The second section examines regional, interregional, and global programs. The regional programs are divided into Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, Middle East and Western Asia, and Europe. The next section lists published information sources including those used to compile the country, regional, interregional, and global reports. Other sources include periodic publications from various agencies and organizations which provide current information about population, addresses to obtain additional information, and a listing of UNFPA representatives (names, addresses, and telephone numbers) in the field. The Inventory concludes with a detailed index.
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  4. 4
    062173

    A demographic perspective on developing Asia and its relevance to the Bank.

    Pernia EM

    Manila, Philippines, Asian Development Bank, Economics Office, 1987 May. 28 p. (Economics Office Report Series No. 40)

    Even though population growth rates continue to decline in developing member countries (DMCs) of the Asian Development Bank, they will experience absolute population increases larger than those in the past. More importantly, the labor force continues to grow and absolute increases will be greater than any other time in history. Family planning education and access to contraceptives have contributed to the decline in population growth rates, but nothing can presently be done to decrease the rates of increase of the labor force because the people have already been born. Since most of the DMSs' populations are growing at 2% or more/year, much needed economic growth is delayed. For example, for any country with a growing population to maintain the amount of capital/person, it must spread capital. Yet the faster the population grows the lesser the chances for increasing that amount. The Bank's short to medium term development policy should include loans for projects that will generate employment using capital widening and deepening and that develop rural areas, such as employment in small industries, to prevent urban migration. Other projects that engulf this policy are those concerning primary, secondary and adult education; health; food supply; and housing and infrastructure. The long term development policy must bolster population programs in DMCs so as to reduce the growth of the economically active segment of the population in the 21st century. In addition, the Bank should address fertility issues as more and more women join the work force. The Bank can play a major role in Asian development by considering the indirect demographic and human resource impacts of each project.
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