Your search found 15 Results

  1. 1
    332481

    World health statistics 2010.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2010. [177] p.

    World Health Statistics 2010 contains WHO's annual compilation of data from its 193 Member States, and includes a summary of progress towards the health-related Millennium Development Goals and targets. This volume's indicators, taken together, provide a comprehensive summary of the current status of nine aspects of national health and health systems: mortality and burden of disease; cause-specific mortality and morbidity; selected infectious diseases; health service coverage; risk factors; health workforce, infrastructure and essential medicines; health expenditure; health inequities; and demographic and socioeconomic statistics.
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  2. 2
    188301

    Country profiles for population and reproductive health: policy developments and indicators 2003.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]; Population Reference Bureau [PRB]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2003. iv, 345 p.

    This section outlines the objectives of the country’s formal population policy (if any), or of population-related components of its general development policies. Actions and other measures currently taken to implement these policies are also highlighted to illustrate the Government’s political will and priorities. These descriptions are based on various sources, including the biennial Population Policy Inquiries of the United Nations Population Division and the regular reports on country programme progress submitted to UNFPA. Each of the major subregions is introduced with an overview of common key issues. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    120055

    Programme review and strategy development report: Zambia.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]. Technical and Evaluation Division; United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]. Africa Division

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 1995. viii, 103 p. (Programme Review and Strategy Developpement Report No. 42)

    This report presents the findings of a 1993 UN Population Fund (UNFPA) Programme Review and Strategy Development Mission to Zambia which sought to review the nation's program of population activities and to design a strategy for an expanded population program. The report opens by presenting country data highlights, a map, and a summary. Chapter 1 describes the population and development context in terms of demographic trends and of the political and socioeconomic context. Chapter 2 reviews the national population program through a look at population and development policy and plans, implementation of the population program, and past and present technical cooperation. The third chapter reviews the proposed national population program strategies and makes proposals for general strategies, sectoral strategies, and UNFPA assistance.
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  4. 4
    119975

    Programme review and strategy development report: United Republic of Tanzania.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]. Technical and Evaluation Division; United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]. Africa Division

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 1994. viii, 109 p. (Programme Review and Strategy Development Report No. 39)

    This report presents the findings of a 1991 UN Population Fund (UNFPA) Programme Review and Strategy Development Mission to Tanzania which sought to assess the nation's most urgent population needs and to make strategic proposals to deal with them. The report opens by presenting country data highlights, a map, and a summary. Chapter 1 describes the population and development context in terms of socioeconomic background, demographic trends, and population policy. Chapter 2 deals with population and development planning and trends in technical cooperation. The third chapter looks at implementation of the population program through a consideration of population and development; basic data collection; demographic training and research; maternal and child health and family planning (MCH/FP); AIDS; information, education, and communication; women, population, and development; youth; and population and the environment, urbanization, and migration. Chapter 4 presents the proposed national population program strategies for 1991-2001 and makes recommendations which lead to a balanced attention to the generation of demand for population program services and to the strengthening of institutional capacity to meet this demand. The Mission also developed strategies to meet the goals of the proposed UNFPA country program which are derived from the goals contained in the draft National Population Policy.
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  5. 5
    146274

    Annual report on international statistics. 1999.

    Begeer W; Stemerdink GJ; Berze D

    Voorburg, Netherlands, International Statistical Institute [ISI], 1999. xii, 139 p. (ARIS Vol. 6)

    This paper presents an annual report on the international statistics for the year 1999 published by the International Statistical Institute (ISI) of Netherlands. The first chapter contains three articles concerning perspectives on statistics. The second chapter presents descriptions of the activities and plans of ISI and its five sections. The third chapter involves two parts: part A describes the statistical activities of the UN and its related institutions, while part B covers other international governmental organizations. The fourth chapter profiles international associations active in statistics and related fields. The fifth chapter focuses on private sector organizations, which includes a number of data archives. In addition, it presents non-profit organizations with an "official" background, like EuroCost. Chapter six presents a comprehensive listing of meetings for a number of years ahead.
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  6. 6
    129385

    Population issues briefing kit 1997.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 1997. 24 p.

    This UN Population Fund Briefing Kit for 1997 provides information on ten topics. The first discussion, on reproductive rights, reproductive health, and family planning (FP) is augmented by information on how FP saves lives by allowing women to properly time, space, and end births and on recognition of the human right to plan and regulate family size. Section 2 covers issues related to population, development, and the empowerment of women and reviews the mandates included in the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development, the 1995 World Summit for Social Development, and the 1995 Fourth World Conference on Women. Section 3 links population with sustainable development and environmental degradation and calls for recognition of the skill of women as effective managers of natural resources. The fourth section reviews population trends which estimate an annual increase in world population of 81 million people at a growth rate of 1.5%. Section 5 presents demographic trends by region and highlights the concepts of the "rate of natural increase" and of the "total fertility rate." Section 6 considers migration in terms of internal migration and urbanization and of international migration. The seventh section discusses information, education, and communication as a means of increasing the empowerment contained in the acquisition of knowledge. Section 8 covers the data barrier posed by the lack of reliable vital statistics and/or the failure to disaggregate data in many countries. Filling this data gap is shown to be a priority, especially in order to include the work of women in national accounting and censuses. Section 9 outlines the challenges for population programs in the 21st century, and the final section considers the necessity to craft policies to support the family in its role of providing support and protection for its members.
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  7. 7
    122820

    Population policy, research and the Cairo Plan of Action: new directions for the Sahel?

    Margolis SP

    International Family Planning Perspectives. 1997 Jun; 23(2):86-9.

    Since the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), researchers have debated the potential gains and losses which may result from the changes which underlay the Cairo Plan of Action. Population policy was redefined at the ICPD through a greater emphasis upon reproductive health and empowering women at the expense of traditional macro-level demographic rationale linking population and development. Policy emphasizing basic individual human rights with a focus upon health, especially for the least empowered, can help lead to the achievement of national demographic objectives in Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, and Senegal. Policy and research agenda, demographics of the Sahel, and a new approach to reducing population growth rates in the region are discussed. High-quality reproductive health services need to be delivered and a better understanding of the determinants of reproductive health behavior attained.
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  8. 8
    121888

    Programme of Action adopted at the International Conference on Population and Development, Cairo, 5-13 September 1994.

    International Conference on Population and Development [ICPD] (1994: Cairo)

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 1996. viii, 166 p.

    This document is a pocket edition of the Programme of Action of the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development. Part 1 of the booklet contains the text of the Programme of Action. Chapter 1 contains the Preamble, and chapter 2 describes the principles upon which the Programme of Action is based. For each of the major headings in the remaining 14 chapters, the basis of action, objectives, and specific actions are presented. Chapter 3 covers the interrelationships between population, sustained economic growth, and sustainable development. Chapter 4 deals with gender equality, equity, and the empowerment of women. The fifth chapter looks at the roles, rights, composition, and structure of the family, and chapter 6 is concerned with population growth and structure. Chapter 7 discusses issues related to reproductive rights and reproductive health, while chapter 8 concentrates on health, morbidity, and mortality. The ninth chapter is devoted to population distribution, urbanization, and internal migration, and chapter 10 focuses on international migration. The relationship of population, development, and education is considered in chapter 11, and research issues are included in chapter 12. Chapters 13-15 relay what is needed in the areas of national action, international cooperation, and partnerships with the nongovernmental sector, respectively, and the final chapter reviews the necessary national, regional, and international follow-up activities. Part 2 of the booklet reproduces the oral and written statements and reservations about the Programme of Action submitted by various countries.
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  9. 9
    120054

    Programme review and strategy development report: Islamic Republic of Iran.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]. Technical and Evaluation Division; United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]. Asia and the Pacific Division

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 1995. viii, 81 p. (Programme Review and Strategy Development Report No. 44)

    This report presents the findings of a 1993 UN Population Fund (UNFPA) Programme Review and Strategy Development Mission to Iran which sought to review the nation's program of population and development situation, to assess progress in the implementation of population and related policies and programs, to identify constraints and priority needs, and to develop a set of strategies as the basis for the second UNFPA country program. The report opens by presenting country data highlights, a map, and a summary. Chapter 1 describes the population and development context in terms of the government and administration; demographic trends; the population policy; socioeconomic background; urbanization; population distribution; unemployment; environmental degradation; and women, population, and development. Chapter 2 reviews the national population program through a look at population and development policy and plans, implementation of the population program, and past and present technical cooperation. The third chapter reviews the proposed national population program strategies and makes proposals for general strategies, sectoral strategies, and UNFPA assistance.
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  10. 10
    115640

    Democratic Republic of the Sudan. Report of Second Mission on Needs Assessment for Population Assistance.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 1986 Jul. x, 67 p. (Report No. 84)

    This report covers the second (1986) UN Population Fund Needs Assessment Mission to Sudan which sought information on the status of and prospects for population activities. The introductory material includes highlights of statistical data in the areas of demography, health, education, and the economy as well as a map of the country. Chapter 1 of the report contains a summary and recommendations for assistance in the following areas which are discussed more fully in the chapters noted: population policies and population and development planning (Chapter 4); basic data collection and analysis (Chapter 5); social, economic, and demographic research (Chapter 6); maternal and child health and family planning (FP) (Chapter 7); population information, education, and communication (Chapter 8); and women and development (Chapter 9). Chapter 2 of the report describes the national setting in terms of its geographical, cultural, governmental, economic, and social characteristics. Chapter 3 looks at population trends and their implications. In conclusion, chapter 10 discusses the possibilities for external multilateral and bilateral assistance for population programs as well as assistance from nongovernmental organizations.
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  11. 11
    115639

    Qatar. Report of Mission on Needs Assessment for Population Assistance.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 1990 Sep. vii, 49 p. (Report No. 101)

    This report covers the 1989 UN Population Fund Needs Assessment Mission which sought information on the status of and prospects for population activities in Qatar. The introductory material includes highlights of statistical data in the areas of demography, health, education, and the economy as well as a map of the country. Chapter 1 contains a summary of background material and recommendations for population assistance in the areas of population and development policy formation, basic data collection and analysis, health care, population education and information, and improving the status of women. Chapter 2 gives information on the national setting including its geographic, cultural, and governmental features as well as the state of economic and social development and national planning. Chapter 3 looks at population features and trends such as size, the growth rate and natural increase, fertility and nuptiality, mortality, age composition, labor force and immigration, and literacy. Chapter 4 covers aspects of basic data collection and analysis contained in the institutional structure, population censuses and surveys, civil registration, demographic research and training, and the Central Statistical Organization publications. Chapter 5 deals with the general topic of health and looks at the organization of health services, facilities and personnel, maternal and child health, family planning and infertility, the handicapped, training, and health statistics. Chapter 6 considers population education and communication in terms of formal and nonformal education and the media. Chapter 7 discusses the position of women relative to health, education, economic activities, and the institutional structure. The concluding chapter notes that the UNFPA is willing to cooperate with the government if it wishes to implement the recommendations contained in this report.
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  12. 12
    092014

    Expert Group Meeting on Population Growth and Demographic Structure.

    POPULATION BULLETIN OF THE UNITED NATIONS. 1993; (34-35):102-19.

    As part of the preparation for the forth-coming UN International Conference on Population and Development, an expert group met in Paris, France, in November 1992 to discuss population growth and demographic structure. As part of the demographic background for the meeting provided by the UN Population Division, participants were informed that although the world population growth rate began to decline in the late 1970s, this decline has not yet resulted in declining absolute numbers, and the annual increment to the world population was not expected to decline to the level that existed in 1985 until the period 2020-25. World population increased from 2.5 billion in 1950 to 5.3 billion in 1990. The medium variant population projection of the UN shows world population at 6.3 billion in 2000 and 8.5 billion in 2025 (the high variant shows 9.4 billion in 2025 and the low variant shows 7.6 billion). Population aging is expected to reach unparalleled levels in 2010-20. The meeting then considered the topics of population growth and socioeconomic development, confronting poverty in developing countries, demographic impacts of development patterns, demographic and health transitions, population growth and employment, social change and the elderly in developing countries, and social development and ageing in developed countries, The expert group meeting then prepared 19 recommendations aimed at governments, social institutions, and the international community. The recommendations call for political commitment to human resources development and population and development programs, especially in least developed countries, alleviation of poverty and social inequality, and equality of access to social and health resources that will lead to reduced mortality and fertility. Governments are urged to place a high priority on education and on increasing women's access to education and to remove barriers to economic independence for women. Health-sector priorities should be reassessed to provide the most cost-effective and efficient means of providing health care, reproductive health-care programs should receive high priority, and efforts should be made to minimize the effects of HIV infection and reduce the spread of AIDS. The needs of the elderly should be met with a "safety net," which should be developed in countries with no social security programs. The elderly should be recognized as an important human resource for development, and intergenerational equity should exist to accommodate their needs, with special efforts made to help them remain in their own homes and communities. Governments should collect accurate, comprehensive, and regular data on population characteristics and trends, and the international community should facilitate the comparative analysis of such data. Training should be provided to professionals in demography and related fields in developing countries.
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  13. 13
    084559

    Pakistan, South Asia region.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    IPPF COUNTRY PROFILES. 1992 Aug; SAR 19-24.

    In 1984 in Pakistan, the government's Council of Islamic Ideology banned contraception unless pregnancy would jeopardize a woman's life. The government soon realized that its 2.9% population growth rate was too high to achieve social and economic development, so it implemented a national population policy, hoping to reduce population growth to 2.5% by 2000. The policy calls for a multisectoral approach, emphasizing mobile services to promote birth spacing and maternal and child health and providing family planning services through the public and private sector and family welfare centers. The policy also aims to increase literacy, reduce unemployment, and improve health care. It targets rural areas where 72% of the population lives. In 1989, only 9.1% of 15-49 year old married women used contraceptives and 58.6% wanted to control their fertility but did not have access to family planning information and services. Pakistan depends greatly on the family planning services of the nongovernmental organization. Family Planning Association of Pakistan (FPAP). FPAP introduced family welfare centers, social marketing, and reproductive health centers to Pakistan. It continues to introduce new contraceptives. FPAP's major projects include educational programs in population, family planning, and nutrition; family planning training; promotion of family planning and maternal and child health; programs emphasizing male involvement in family planning; information, education, and communication; and lobbying Parliament for more funding for family planning and for improvement in women's status.
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  14. 14
    077732

    Inventory of population projects in developing countries around the world, 1988/1989: multilateral organization assistance, regional organization assistance, bilateral agency assistance, non-governmental organization and other assistance.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, [1990]. [12], 932 p.

    The UNFPA periodically releases a publication listing population projects supported and/or operated by various organizations. This publication also has basic demographic data and each country's population policy. The 16th edition covers the period from January 1, 1988 to June 30, 1989. The first section reviews all the countries' programs and makes up the bulk of the publication. Each division in this section begins with demographic data, followed by the government's views about population growth, specifically as it affects mortality and morbidity; fertility, nuptiality, and family; spatial distribution and urbanization; international migration. Each division next examines the population projects and external assistance. The second section examines regional, interregional, and global programs. The regional programs are divided into Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, Middle East and Western Asia, and Europe. The next section lists published information sources including those used to compile the country, regional, interregional, and global reports. Other sources include periodic publications from various agencies and organizations which provide current information about population, addresses to obtain additional information, and a listing of UNFPA representatives (names, addresses, and telephone numbers) in the field. The Inventory concludes with a detailed index.
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  15. 15
    062173

    A demographic perspective on developing Asia and its relevance to the Bank.

    Pernia EM

    Manila, Philippines, Asian Development Bank, Economics Office, 1987 May. 28 p. (Economics Office Report Series No. 40)

    Even though population growth rates continue to decline in developing member countries (DMCs) of the Asian Development Bank, they will experience absolute population increases larger than those in the past. More importantly, the labor force continues to grow and absolute increases will be greater than any other time in history. Family planning education and access to contraceptives have contributed to the decline in population growth rates, but nothing can presently be done to decrease the rates of increase of the labor force because the people have already been born. Since most of the DMSs' populations are growing at 2% or more/year, much needed economic growth is delayed. For example, for any country with a growing population to maintain the amount of capital/person, it must spread capital. Yet the faster the population grows the lesser the chances for increasing that amount. The Bank's short to medium term development policy should include loans for projects that will generate employment using capital widening and deepening and that develop rural areas, such as employment in small industries, to prevent urban migration. Other projects that engulf this policy are those concerning primary, secondary and adult education; health; food supply; and housing and infrastructure. The long term development policy must bolster population programs in DMCs so as to reduce the growth of the economically active segment of the population in the 21st century. In addition, the Bank should address fertility issues as more and more women join the work force. The Bank can play a major role in Asian development by considering the indirect demographic and human resource impacts of each project.
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