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  1. 1
    143037

    Latin America: urban and rural population projections, 1970-2025. America Latina: proyecciones de poblacion urbana y rural, 1970-2025.

    United Nations. Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean; United Nations. Centro Latinoamericano y Caribeno de Demografia [CELADE]

    BOLETIN DEMOGRAFICO / DEMOGRAPHIC BULLETIN. 1999 Jan; (63):1-256.

    This bulletin issue was prepared by Guiomar Bay on the basis of the national population estimates and projections produced by Susana Schkolnik. Activities were coordinated by Juan Chackiel, Chief of the Demography Area of the Latin America and Caribbean Demographic Centre (CELADE)--Population Division. This issue covers information for Latin American and Caribbean countries and territories and is based on estimates and projections from the Population Division of the United Nations. The population figures for the calendar years 1995-2005 were obtained by interpolation using Karup-King multipliers. The projected populations were based on a "medium" or "recommended" fertility projection together with notes and projections of the total urban and rural population. The estimates and projections of the total population by sex and age group for each of the 20 countries for the period 1970-2025 were prepared mostly in conjunction with national institutions. The urban and rural population projections were in almost all cases prepared by CELADE because most of the countries have not yet prepared their own projections based on the most recent census data. A detailed list of information sources and a description of the methodology used for each country are also included.
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  2. 2
    048989

    Contraceptive prevalence in St. Kitts-Nevis.

    Jagdeo TP

    New York, New York, International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region, 1985. xi, 102, 24 p. (IPPF/WHR Caribbean Contraceptive Prevalence Surveys)

    An analysis of Caribbean contraceptive prevalence surveys is the focus of this report by the IPPF, Western Hemisphere Region, through its Caribbean Population and Development project. This booklet reports on 1 aspect of the project--the analysis of contraceptive surveys conducted in St. Kitts-Nevis and Montserrat to determine levels of contraceptive use and assess the effectiveness of information, education, and delivery services. Chapter 1 outlines the background, economic, social, and family structures, and organization of family planning services in St. Kitts-Nevis. The methodology of the survey is explained. Chapter 2 provides a demographic analysis of fertility, parity, and unplanned pregnancy rates. The level of awareness of contraceptives and contraceptive outlets is presented in Chapter 3. Patterns of contraceptive use, with user and non-user profiles, preferred sources for contraceptive outlets, user satisfaction with methods and outlets, male involvement in family planning, and the timing of contraceptive use are the topics covered in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 provides an overview of contraceptive use, family planning programs, and sense of self-worth in St. Kitts-Nevis. Social sources of resistance to contraceptive use and the contraceptive intentions of non-acceptors are characterized in Chapter 6. Chapter 7 offers a summary and conclusions of the study findings, and the 1984 contraceptive prevalence survey used in St. Kitts-Nevis is supplied in the appendix.
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  3. 3
    032594

    Some lessons from the attempt to retrieve early KAP and fertility surveys.

    Hermalin AI; Entwisle B; Myers LG

    New York, New York, Population Council, 1985 Sep. 5, [6] p. (Fertility Determinants Research Note No. 5)

    One of the notable features of population studies in the past 35 years has been the increasing reliance on sample surveys as the primary source of demographic data. Past surveys of knowledge, attitudes, and practice of contraception in developing countries are important resources. These early KAP and fertility surveys, conducted 10 or more years ago, provide benchmarks for the study of how group differentials in behavior and attitudes evolve with time. Together with recent surveys, they help to monitor the pace and nature of the transition from 1 demographic regime to another within societies. Attempts to retrieve the earlier data produced constructive lessons and recommendations on how to safeguard current and future surveys and promote their use. 3 recommendations emerge that will help safeguard current and future surveys and promote their use. 1) Develop standards of documentation and maintenance, including how long questionnaires are to be retained, now much of the detail of sampling design should be saved, what constitutes an adequate description of interviewer characteristics and instruction. 2) Arrange for public access and the mechanisms to promote it. Funds should be budgeted for this purpose from the outset. Surveys that are still not generally available after a reasonable number of years lose much of their value and deprive the demographic community of a valuable resource. 3) Create structures to preserve and disseminate KAP and fertility surveys. The need for this is greatest for surveys not associated with large international programs. In all cases arrangements for longterm preservation must be made. Tables are included which describe 3rd world countries in which KAP or fertility surveys were conducted before 1981, and an inventory of pairs of surveys for potential use in conparative and over-time analysis.
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  4. 4
    016508

    Haiti--Demographic Census and Survey. Report of the Evaluation Mission, March 1975.

    Swan EP; Melchoir S

    New York, United Nations Fund for Population Activities, 1975, Apr. 50 p. (HAI/70/PO1)

    A mission was sent to Haiti to evaluate the progress of the census project. Results were: 1) the preparatory work of the census, including mapping, sample selection, household listing, and questionnaire design, was done satisfactorily, and 2) the data collection operation was carried out with a well trained staff but the information on economic characteristics and migration may be less reliable than the basic demographic data on age and sex. The following recommendations were made: 1) that technical and financial support be given to the Haitian government for the establishment within the IHS of a separate unit for demographic analysis and research, 2) in order to ensure full participation by all government departments and private agencies interested in population analysis and research, a coordinating council should be established, 3) the UNFPA should provide limited financial assistance to the Haitian government to construct a building to house the Demographic Analysis and Research Unit, 4) consideration should be given to the organization of a national symposium with appropriate input from the various departments and agencies of the government on the utilization of census data in their respective fields of specialization, 5) a brief summary report should be prepared for distribution, 6) a report on the methodology employed in the demographic survey program should be prepared for limited distribuiton within the government and the UN, 7) the next Haitian census should include a complete count of the population, 8) in future operations the agricultural data should not be collected at the same time as population and housing data, and 9) the Haiti census and survey project should be extended through December 1975.
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