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  1. 1
    054953

    Republic of Korea.

    Hwan CD

    In: Population perspectives. Statements by world leaders. Second edition, [compiled by] United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]. New York, New York, UNFPA, 1985. 187-8.

    Despite considerable economic growth, the government of the Republic of Korea is still experiencing population-related problems. Concern over population problems began in the 1960's. In response to a growing population, the government implemented growth control measures in order to stimulate economic growth. The government has implemented several comprehensive family planning programs which work to encourage Koreans to have smaller families. The country is also experiencing overcrowding in most of its major cities. Present population policies being implemented work to develop rural areas and their industries in an attempt to prevent further migration to the large cities. The government has also begun implementing programs to deal with the aged. The government of the Republic of Korea feels that it is important that comprehensive population policies are developed in order to deal with population problems on regional, national, and international scales.
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  2. 2
    055080

    The Netherlands.

    Lubbers R

    In: Population perspectives. Statements by world leaders. Second edition, [compiled by] United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]. New York, New York, UNFPA, 1985. 116.

    The government of the Netherlands feels that is the duty and concern of all nations to provide favorable social and economic conditions. The 1984 International Conference on Population in Mexico provides the chance for nations to meet and discuss present day population phenomena. The government of the Netherlands, recognizing the basic rights of couples and individuals concerning birth control, supports a non- intervention policy. However, the Dutch government does give its support to in-depth studies on population control and program implementation in developing countries. The United Nations supports and assists governments implementing population programmes. Central to the U.N. population and development efforts is improving the status of women. However, many member states of the United Nations support the freedom of choice concerning family planning.
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  3. 3
    055066

    Mauritius.

    Jugnauth A

    In: Population perspectives. Statements by world leaders. Second edition, [compiled by] United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]. New York, New York, UNFPA, 1985. 106-7.

    As a result of malaria eradication, general progress in medical science, and free government health services, Mauritius's population grew dramatically in the postwar decades. In addition to this alarming trend in population growth, Mauritius also faced a high population density ratio and a mono-culture economy based on sugar. Initial attempts to offer institutionalized family planning services met with opposition from some religious groups. By 1965, however, the climate was more favorable and the Government moved to provide subsidies to 2 private voluntary organizations that offered family planning services. In the 1965-72 period, the Government of Mauritius took a more aggressive role in population activities by significantly increasing the number of family planning service delivery points and expanding the infrastructure for population control. As a result of these measures, the total fertility rate dropped to 3.42 in 1972 compared with 5.86 in 1962. In the 1972-82 period, even further gains were made and the fertility rate fell to 2.39. Continuous declines have also been recorded in the infant mortality rate, which now (1983) stands at 26/1000 live births. Nonetheless, there is a need to continue to curb population growth to ensure the availability of natural resources. Through measures such as family planning, health, education, communication, and information programs, the Government population policy seeks to lower the gross reproduction rate from 1.18 in 1982 to 1.12 by 1987. Multisector, integrated development is being stressed given recognition that nondemographic factors such as education, better housing, welfare services, policies to modernize agriculture, and economic diversification are essential to improvements in the population's standard of living.
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