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Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    268449

    Report on the evaluation of UNFPA assistance to the strengthening of the civil registration and vital statistics system in Sierra Leone: project SIL/79/P03.

    Kannisto V; Mehta DC; McWilliam J

    New York, New York, United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA], 1984 Dec. x, 28 p.

    While Sierra Leone has a long tradition in registering births and deaths, dating back to the mid-1880s, registration has remained low. In order to improve registration coverage, the original project formulated in 1979 by the government included 3 immediate objectives; the strengthening of the civil registration system in a model area, the experimentation with field organization procedures most suitable for the registration system in the country, and the production of estimates of demographic variables in the model area and in the rest of the country. In the Tripartite Project Review held in 1981, 2 additional objectives were added to the project; the unification of the civil registration laws, including the provision of a uniform and universal legislation for the entire country, and the reorganization and training of the registration hierarchy. While the strategy to use a model area for the development was a sound one, without the law being enacted, new forms and registers could not be printed and thus few of the planned activities could take place. Of the 5 immediate objectives of the project, only one has been achieved--the passage of the Act of 1983 which provides the legal framework for registration to take place nationwide under the new system. Little progress has been made in the achievement of the 4 remaining objectives. The Evaluation Mission made recommendations concerning the need to reformulate the extension document early in 1985, taking into account the results of the Evaluation Mission, the concentration of government action on registration in the non-model areas, and thereafter the gradual expansion of registration to adjacent areas where more complete coverage is possible.
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  2. 2
    267109

    UNFPA operations--report to the general assembly, statement made at the 33rd session of the United Nations General Assembly, New York, 6 Nov 1978.

    Salas RM

    New York, N.Y., UNFPA, [1978]. 13 p.

    In his report to the United Nations General Assembly concerning UNFPA operations, Mr. R. Salas cites the growth of UNFPA from a small US$3 million trust fund with 12 projects of limited scope, to a Fund of the General Assembly with cumulative resources of over US$500 million supporting over 1900 projects in 114 countries throughout the world. The Fund has been a pioneer within the U.N. development system in supporting programs directly aimed at increasing opportunities for greater women's participation in population and development at all levels--as policy makers, program planners and community workers. Due to the publication of a set of guidelines on women, population and development, requests for assistance in projects directly relating to women have grown. Mr. Salas describes the decline in fertility in various parts of the developing world. Birth rates have also declined in many developing countries, on the average of approximately 15%. Expectation of life at birth has been a feature showing impressive gains. Infant mortality, as well as overall death rates in developing countries, have fallen substantially in the recent past. On the negative side, the imbalance between growing human numbers and accessible resources remains. 85-90% of the 1.5 to 2 billion estimated increase in the world's population before the year 2000 is expected to occur in developing countries. Another population related concern is the growing problem of aging of the population caused by the decline of fertility and the prolongation of life expectancy. The need to integrate population factors in development planning is recognized today by almost all developing countries. In assisting governments which show an increasing desire to make their population policies more comprehensive, UNFPA seeks to encourage in-depth exploration of the interaction between population factors and development.
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  3. 3
    267060

    [Positive balance in the ten years of the UNFPA] Balance positivo en los 10 anos del FNUAP.

    Salas RM

    Revista de Prensa. 1978 Nov; 12-13.

    This article discusses changes occurring in population since the foundation of UNFPA in 1969. The birthrate has decreased by 15% in about 3 or 4 dozen countries that represent 2/3 of the developing world. Most changes have occurred in small countries. In the mid 70's the life expectancy rate increased from 42 to 54 years in the developing countries and from 65 to 71 years in the developed countries. Latin America has a life expectancy median of 62 yrs. Asia of 56, and Africa of 45 yrs. In the developing countries infant mortality continues to be the determinant factor of mortality. A decrease in mortality linked with improvements in health, educational services, women status, and a more equalitarian distribution of income has been reported. Nevertheless, malaria has again become an important sanitary problem particulary in Asia and Africa. In India, malaria cases increased from 40,000 in 1966 to 143,000 in 1976. Nutrition and health are also related to mortality. Presently, countries try to conserve gains from good years to prevent difficulties in poor years. It is estimated that during the next 2 decades cities will grow to magnitudes unknown to urbanists. In the year 2000 Tokyo may have 26 million inhabitants, Gran Cairo 16.3, Lagos 9.4, and Mexico 31.6. The number of young adults has increased form 488 million in 1955 to 740 million in 1975. It is expected that in developed countries the will increase from 548 million to 688 million in 1985. Strategies of internal and international migration, measures to open up jobs for the young, and budget increases in population programs in Nepal, Costa Rica, and Mexico in the 1970's are discussed. International cooperation to help developing countries to achieve their own goals in matters of population, thus consolidating the gains of the past years, is recommended.
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  4. 4
    267059

    [Population and the new international economic order] La poblacion y el neuvo orden economico internacional.

    Salas RM

    Medicina y Desarrollo. 1977 May; 13-16.

    The problem of population received little attention in the meetings on the New International Economic Order. Historically, governments have equated population increases with prosperity. Recently, governments have accepted the necessity to reduce population for the succcess of social and economic programs. This article points out the advances made by several countries in the areas of health, nutrition, education, contraception, legal aspects, planning, and research methods since 1972. The collaboration of different governments with UNFPA and their solicitation of help from this organization are regarded as further evidence of the advances made. Difficulties for the acceptance of family planning in developing countries such as social sanctions, lack of demographic data, and the role of UNFPA in the amelioration of these problems are discussed. Since population politics are seen as long-term strategical weapons, an intensification of persuasive methods in all countries and an increase in aid to underdeveloped countries are recommended.
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  5. 5
    267154

    Population trends and issues, statement made at the Meeting of the Netherlands Association of Demographers, The Hague, Netherlands, 14 September, 1983.

    Salas RM

    New York, N.Y., UNFPA, [1983]. 7 p. (Speech Series No. 97)

    If world population is to stabilize by the end of the next century, it will be necessary to strengthen and sustain the downward trend in fertility already begun in most developing countries. Whatever reductions have been achieved in the rate of population growth are the result of fertility declines accompanied by moderate reduction in mortality. Added to the challenge of high birth, mortality and growth rates in some parts of the developing world, a number of issues of equal importance have emerged since the United Nations World Population Conference held in Bucharest in 1974. There are, for example, issues relating to aging, international and local migration, including urbanization, and the interrelationships between population, resources, the environment and development. Most of these problems have national as well as international dimensions. The Government of the Netherlands has taken important steps to alleviate some of these problems. For example, it considers that social and economic policy should constantly take in requirements resulting from changes in the age structure of the population. The Government has been a major donor to the United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) since its inception and has contributed nearly US$105 million in 14 years.
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