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  1. 1
    064186

    The state of world population 1990: choices for the new century.

    Sadik N

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 1990. 40 p.

    The decade of the 1990's, the Fourth Development Decade, will be "critical" because of the world's demographic situation will determine the future for the 21st century in terms of population growth and the effect of growing populations in terms of damage to the environment. Despite the fact that government political support for population programs and activities rose from 97 countries in 1976 to 125 in 1988 (Africa rose from 16 in 1978 to 30 in 1988), the contraceptive prevalence rates in developing countries (excluding China) during the 1980's fell below 40%. Many countries encountered a "mix" of difficulties maintaining their family planning programs (FP) because of declining political support and the debt burden forcing governments to reduce investments in health and social welfare programs, including FP. By the year 2025 the UN expects 8,467 million people; 147 million (<5%) will be in the industrialized countries and 95% in the developing countries of Africa, Latin America and Asia. This report discusses human resource development during the Fourth Development Decade. FP and population programs must become integral components of countries' development process to achieve sustainable economic growth. 19 recommendations are offered on how to achieve sustained fertility declines. This UNFPA report includes the following sections: Introduction; Part 1 "The Challenges Ahead"; Part 2 "Keeping the Options Open"; Part 3 "Human Resource Development-A New Priority"; Conclusion and Recommendations.
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  2. 2
    267060

    [Positive balance in the ten years of the UNFPA] Balance positivo en los 10 anos del FNUAP.

    Salas RM

    Revista de Prensa. 1978 Nov; 12-13.

    This article discusses changes occurring in population since the foundation of UNFPA in 1969. The birthrate has decreased by 15% in about 3 or 4 dozen countries that represent 2/3 of the developing world. Most changes have occurred in small countries. In the mid 70's the life expectancy rate increased from 42 to 54 years in the developing countries and from 65 to 71 years in the developed countries. Latin America has a life expectancy median of 62 yrs. Asia of 56, and Africa of 45 yrs. In the developing countries infant mortality continues to be the determinant factor of mortality. A decrease in mortality linked with improvements in health, educational services, women status, and a more equalitarian distribution of income has been reported. Nevertheless, malaria has again become an important sanitary problem particulary in Asia and Africa. In India, malaria cases increased from 40,000 in 1966 to 143,000 in 1976. Nutrition and health are also related to mortality. Presently, countries try to conserve gains from good years to prevent difficulties in poor years. It is estimated that during the next 2 decades cities will grow to magnitudes unknown to urbanists. In the year 2000 Tokyo may have 26 million inhabitants, Gran Cairo 16.3, Lagos 9.4, and Mexico 31.6. The number of young adults has increased form 488 million in 1955 to 740 million in 1975. It is expected that in developed countries the will increase from 548 million to 688 million in 1985. Strategies of internal and international migration, measures to open up jobs for the young, and budget increases in population programs in Nepal, Costa Rica, and Mexico in the 1970's are discussed. International cooperation to help developing countries to achieve their own goals in matters of population, thus consolidating the gains of the past years, is recommended.
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  3. 3
    267059

    [Population and the new international economic order] La poblacion y el neuvo orden economico internacional.

    Salas RM

    Medicina y Desarrollo. 1977 May; 13-16.

    The problem of population received little attention in the meetings on the New International Economic Order. Historically, governments have equated population increases with prosperity. Recently, governments have accepted the necessity to reduce population for the succcess of social and economic programs. This article points out the advances made by several countries in the areas of health, nutrition, education, contraception, legal aspects, planning, and research methods since 1972. The collaboration of different governments with UNFPA and their solicitation of help from this organization are regarded as further evidence of the advances made. Difficulties for the acceptance of family planning in developing countries such as social sanctions, lack of demographic data, and the role of UNFPA in the amelioration of these problems are discussed. Since population politics are seen as long-term strategical weapons, an intensification of persuasive methods in all countries and an increase in aid to underdeveloped countries are recommended.
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  4. 4
    267058

    Needed: sufficiency for all, excerpt from statement at the World Population Conference, Bucharest, 20 August 1974.

    Salas RM

    Populi. 1974 Sep-Aug; 1(5):4-5.

    Development must be diffused socially and geographically throughout all levels and areas. A society of sufficiency for all, without excess or deprivation, must be aimed at. This concept is valid both nationally and internationally. Progress should not be limited to the economic realm. Rather, priorities should be changed to answer the needs of all. Although growth in terms of GNP has been at its highest ever in the developing world, the economic gap between the developed and the developing countries has widened. The pursuit of increasing wealth has meant greater production, consumption and waste, with consequent increasing damage to the ecological balance. Pollution does not respect national boundaries. The values of cooperation and concern and recognizing the interdependence of human beings are necessary. Change is more readily accepted by national leaders; technologies and techniques are emerging in response to needs. Population should be seen as an integral part of the sufficiency society and the adoption of sensible policies in this field is essential. A clear understanding of the complex interrelationships of fertility, mortality, morbidity, migration and the growth, distribution and structure of the population, and economic and social factors is essential. Since population deals with the most delicate of human relationships, it must be dealth with on the personal level. The Fund should respond to countries' own assessments of their needs and priorities. External aid is to be used when its effect will be of the greatest benefit to the recipient country. A comprehensive and effective communication network is essential. Salas examines the operation of the Fund through examples. The Fund actively assists in furtherance and expansion of family planning and maternal child health programs in many countries. Adequate housing, education and health services, improvement in women's status and income redistribution are crucial factors. Population programs must be an integral part of the total development effort. The success of programs largely depends on the leadership and quality of training of workers before they undertake a project.
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