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  1. 1
    030796

    Burma: report of Mission on Needs Assessment for Population Assistance.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, UNFPA, 1985 Mar. viii, 68 p. (Report No. 70)

    The UN Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) is in the process of an extensive programming exercise intended to respond to the needs for population assistance in a priority group of developing countries. This report presents the findings of the Mission that visited Burma from May 9-25, 1984. The report includes dat a highlights; a summary and recommendations for population assistance; the national setting; population policies and population and development planning; data collection, analysis, and demographic training and research;maternal and child health, including child spacing; population education in the in-school and out-of school sectors; women, population, and development; and external assistance -- multilateral assistance, bilateral assistance, and assistance from nongovernmental organizations. In Burma overpopulation is not a concern. Population activities are directed, rather, toward the improvement of health standards. The main thrust of government efforts is to reduce infant mortality and morbidity, promote child spacing, improve medical services in rural areas, and generally raise standards of public health. In drafting its recommendations, whether referring to current programs and activities or to new areas of concern, the Mission was guided by the government's policies and objectives in the field of population. Recommendations include: senior planning officials should visit population and development planning offices in other countries to observe program organization and implementation; continued support should be given to ensure the successful completion of the tabulation and analysis of the 1983 Population Census; the People's Health Plan II (1982-86) should be strengthened through the training of health personnel at all levels, in in-school, in-service, and out-of-country programs; and the need exists to establish a program of orientation to train administrators, trainers/educators, and key field staff of the Department of Health and the Department of Cooperatives in various aspects of population communication work.
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  2. 2
    267058

    Needed: sufficiency for all, excerpt from statement at the World Population Conference, Bucharest, 20 August 1974.

    Salas RM

    Populi. 1974 Sep-Aug; 1(5):4-5.

    Development must be diffused socially and geographically throughout all levels and areas. A society of sufficiency for all, without excess or deprivation, must be aimed at. This concept is valid both nationally and internationally. Progress should not be limited to the economic realm. Rather, priorities should be changed to answer the needs of all. Although growth in terms of GNP has been at its highest ever in the developing world, the economic gap between the developed and the developing countries has widened. The pursuit of increasing wealth has meant greater production, consumption and waste, with consequent increasing damage to the ecological balance. Pollution does not respect national boundaries. The values of cooperation and concern and recognizing the interdependence of human beings are necessary. Change is more readily accepted by national leaders; technologies and techniques are emerging in response to needs. Population should be seen as an integral part of the sufficiency society and the adoption of sensible policies in this field is essential. A clear understanding of the complex interrelationships of fertility, mortality, morbidity, migration and the growth, distribution and structure of the population, and economic and social factors is essential. Since population deals with the most delicate of human relationships, it must be dealth with on the personal level. The Fund should respond to countries' own assessments of their needs and priorities. External aid is to be used when its effect will be of the greatest benefit to the recipient country. A comprehensive and effective communication network is essential. Salas examines the operation of the Fund through examples. The Fund actively assists in furtherance and expansion of family planning and maternal child health programs in many countries. Adequate housing, education and health services, improvement in women's status and income redistribution are crucial factors. Population programs must be an integral part of the total development effort. The success of programs largely depends on the leadership and quality of training of workers before they undertake a project.
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  3. 3
    024640

    Kiribati: report of Mission on Needs Assessment for Population Assistance.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 1982. 53 p. (Report No. 54)

    There is no comprehensive national population policy in Kiribati. Migration from the outer islands to urban South Tarawa is a problem. Overcrowding on the island will soon be severe. The National Development Plan aims at maintaining a balance between population and natural resources. The Mission proposes aid for population-related projects. The Central Planning Office coordinates the development activities. A National Population and Development Co-Ordinating Committee has been established. The government needs more staff to deal with overcrowding. The country's data base needs to be strengthened and upgraded. The Mission recommends that 1) another census be carried out in 1983; and 2) an inventory of research relating to Kiribati be maintained. The government has made efforts to provide an adequate health services network. The Mission recommends that a consultant be provided who specialized in health education and community participation. The family planning program has been diminishing in effectiveness. The Mission recommends support for: 1) a 3-year In-School Population Education Project; and 2) a project to focus on using communications programs to increase outer-island participation in population-related and development activites. The government has set up a Women's Interest Section to coordinate and develop policies and programs. The Mission recommends support for a 3-year project to aid the National Women's Federation. The United Nations Fund for Population Activities Youth Training Program should be supported. Protestants and Roman Catholics have promoted family life, health education and community-based activities.
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