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  1. 1
    099402

    National report on population. Prepared for the International Conference on Population and Development, September 1994.

    Tunisia. Ministry of Planning and Regional Development

    [Tunis], Tunisia, Ministry of Planning and Regional Development, 1994 Aug. 57 p.

    Tunisia's country report for the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development opens with a brief discussion of the country's history and development achievements (the population growth rate has been reduced from 3.2% in the beginning of the 1960s to less than 2%, and Tunisia has achieved significant improvement over the past 2 decades in human development indices). Tunisia's population policy has gone through 3 stages: the establishment of an important legal framework during the 1950s and 60s, the creation of a National Family and Population Board and establishment of basic health care facilities during the 1970s, and an emphasis on environmentally-responsible development with an attempt to strengthen the integration of population policies into development strategies beginning in the 1980s. The report continues with an overview of the demographic context (historical trends and future prospects). The chapter on population policies and programs covers the evolution and status of the policies; sectoral strategies; development and research; a profile of the family health, family planning (FP), IEC (information, education, and communication), and data collection and analysis programs. This chapter also provides details on policies and programs which link women and families to population and development and on those which concern mortality, population distribution, and migration. The third major section of the report presents operational features of the implementation of population and FP programs, in particular, political support, program formulation and execution, supervision and evaluation, financing, and the importance and relevance of the world plan of action for population. Tunisia's national action plan for the future is discussed next in terms of new problems and priorities and a mobilization of resources. This section also includes a table which sets out the components, goals, strategies, and programs of action of the population policy. In conclusion, it is stated that Tunisia's population policy fits well with the world program of action because it promotes human resources and sustainable development and respects international recommendations about human rights in general and the rights of women in particular.
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  2. 2
    099432

    Government of Sierra Leone. National report on population and development. International Conference on Population and Development 1994.

    Sierra Leone. National Population Commission

    Freetown, Sierra Leone, National Population Commission, 1994. [4], 15, [4] p.

    The government of Sierra Leone is very concerned about the poor health status of the country as expressed by the indicators of a high maternal mortality rate (700/100,000), a total fertility rate of 6.2 (in 1985), a crude birth rate of 47/1000 (in 1985), an infant mortality rate of 143/1000 (in 1990), and a life expectancy at birth of only 45.7 years. A civil war has exacerbated the already massive rural-urban migration in the country. Despite severe financial constraints, the government has contributed to the UN Population Fund and continues to appeal to the donor community for technical and financial help to support the economy in general and population programs in particular. Sierra Leone has participated in preparations for and fully supports the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development. This document describes Sierra Leone's past, present, and future population and development linkages. The demographic context is presented in terms of size and growth rate; age and sex composition; fertility; mortality; and population distribution, migration, and urbanization. The population policy planning and program framework is set out through discussions of the national perception of population issues, the national population policy, population in development planning, and a profile of the national population program [including maternal-child health and family planning (FP) services; information, education, and communication; data collection, analysis, and research; primary health care, population and the environment; youth and adolescents and development; women and development; and population distribution and migration]. The operational aspects of the program are described with emphasis on political and national support, FP service delivery and coverage, monitoring and evaluation, and funding. The action plan for the future includes priority concerns; an outline of the policy framework; the design of population program activities; program coordination, monitoring, and evaluation; and resource mobilization. The government's commitment is reiterated in a summary and in 13 recommendations of action to strengthen the population program, address environmental issues, improve the status of women, improve rural living conditions, and improve data collection.
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  3. 3
    097737

    Programme review and strategy development report: Ethiopia.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 1994 viii, 82 p. (Programme Review and Strategy Development Report No. 34)

    This report describes the present demographic and socioeconomic situation in Ethiopia; the national population program, policies, and supporting international agencies; and recommendations for a population and development strategy. The recommendations involve general proposals on population policy, service delivery, IEC (information, education, and communication), social mobilization, human resource development, resource mobilization and program coordination, sectoral strategies, data collection, training and research, maternal and child health, sexually transmitted diseases, AIDS, adolescent reproductive health, population IEC, women in development, and environmental and population issues. Currently, programs are implemented in fragmented and uncoordinated ways. The recommendation is to create mechanisms for an integrated approach and an institutional mechanism for mobilizing and coordinating external assistance, such as a UN Population Fund (UNFPA) catalytic role in organizing meetings between government, donor agencies, and nongovernmental groups. There is currently a low level of infrastructural and technological development. The government social development initiatives will be directed to economic recovery and reconstruction. Policy makers have been made aware of the importance of integrating population into development. UNFPA has given its support since 1973; its second country program for 1987-1992 met with obstacles such as political instability, lack of a comprehensive and explicit population policy, lack of a policy-making institution for population programs, insufficient data, lack of culturally-sensitive IEC, and lack of defined policy guidelines. The health infrastructure only meets the needs of about 50% of the population. Awareness of the interrelationships among women, population, and development is insufficient.
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  4. 4
    101204

    Inventory of population projects in developing countries around the world, 1993.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 1994. xiii, 730 p. (Population Programmes and Projects Vol. 2)

    This inventory contains information about externally-assisted population projects and programs in developing countries which were funded, initiated, or implemented by international organizations in 1993. The description of individual country programs begins with demographic facts, which were gleaned, in general, from the UN Population Division's "World Population Prospects: The 1992 Revisions. For the most part, the demographic data apply to 1990. In addition to Population Division data, facts are provided for each country on agricultural population density (per hectare of arable land) and the gross national product per capita. Country descriptions continue with a table of population policy indicators (population growth, fertility level, contraceptive usage, mortality, spatial distribution, internal migration, immigration, and emigration). Projects are then listed for each country according to the source of assistance: multilateral, from the UN system; bilateral, which involves direct assistance from individual governments or their agencies; regional, which includes all organizations located and operational only within a specific geographic area; and nongovernmental or other, such as universities, research or training institutes, and corporations. Assistance is defined to include grants, loans, technical and operational support, training, and provision of equipment and supplies. Listings of research projects are based on an assessment of the value of the information for the donor community and the governments of developing countries. Dollar values are indicated, when possible. Information for regional (involving assistance to several countries within a given region under one program), interregional (activities in specific countries located in more than one geographical region), and global (not limited to specific countries, groups of countries, or regions) programs is organized similarly, but no population policy indicators are given. The inventory ends with a list of addresses and an index.
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  5. 5
    099433

    The Philippines: country report on population. International Conference on Population and Development, 5-13 September 1994, Cairo, Egypt.

    Philippines. Commission on Population

    [Manila], Philippines, Commission on Population, 1994. [4], 40 p.

    The country report on population prepared by the Philippines for the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development opens with a discussion of the 3 interdependent strategies which will be used to achieve development: total human resource development, international competitiveness, and sustainable development. Since the Philippines envisions development proceeding primarily from the initiatives of individuals, families, nongovernment organizations (NGOs), cooperatives, etc., empowerment of the people is a major objective of the government. To this end, the family is seen as the focal point for analysis of needs and resource use and for mobilization. The problems which beset the Philippines today and which are exacerbated by rapid population growth are pervasive poverty, a heavy debt burden, high unemployment and underemployment, a decrease in productive land, environmental degradation, and a poor economic performance. The country report considers the relationship between population, economic growth, and sustainable development in terms of the demographic situation and the economic situation. The report provides a history of the development of population policy and population programs in the country. The concerns of the population program are the environment and development, transitional population growth, the population structure, urbanization, migration, the status of women, maternal and child health and family planning (FP), and data collection and analysis. Various components of the implementation of the population program are described including political and national support, the national implementation strategy, the integration of population and development and assessment of integration efforts, responsible parenthood/FP, and the assessment of FP service delivery. Mechanisms for program monitoring and evaluation are presented along with an assessment of program efficiency, and the financial aspects of the program are discussed. After touching on the relevance of the World Population Plan of Action, the report puts forth the national 9-point action plan for the future which has the following goals: 1) to integrate population and development planning; 2) to strengthen the responsible parenthood/FP program; 3) to strengthen population education and the adolescent fertility program; 4) to increase the participation of women; 5) to build capabilities and develop institutions; 6) to decentralize administration; 7) to develop a sustainable financial plan; 8) to increase NGO and people's organization participation; and 9) to develop a reliable data base. The appendices present the demographic, health, and economic indicators for 1960-90 in tabular form and provide an outline of population policies, legislation, and incentives.
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  6. 6
    092019

    Synthesis of the expert group meetings convened as part of the substantive preparations for the International Conference on Population and Development.

    POPULATION BULLETIN OF THE UNITED NATIONS. 1993; (34-35):3-18.

    As part of the preparation for the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development to be sponsored by the UN in Cairo, 6 expert groups were convened to consider 1) population growth; 2) population policies and programs; 3) population, development, and the environment; 4) migration; 5) the status of women; and 6) family planning programs, health, and family well-being. Each group included 15 experts representing a full range of relevant scientific disciplines and geographic regions. Each meeting lasted 5 days and included a substantive background paper prepared by the Population Division as well as technical papers. Each meeting concluded with the drafting of between 18 and 37 recommendations (a total of 162). The meeting on population, the environment, and development focused on the implications of current trends in population and the environment for sustained economic growth and sustainable development. The meeting on population policies and programs observed that, since 1984, there has been a growing convergence of views about population growth among the nations of the world and that the stabilization of world population as soon as possible is now an internationally recognized goal. The group on population and women identified practical steps that agencies could take to empower women in order to achieve beneficial effects on health, population trends, and development. The meeting on FP, health, and family well-being reviewed policy-oriented issues emerging from the experience of FP programs. The meeting on population growth and development reviewed trends and prospects of population growth and age structure and their consequences for global sustainability. The population distribution and migration experts appraised current trends and their interrelationship with development. In nearly all of the group meetings, common issues emerged. Concern was universally voiced for sustainable development and sustained economic growth, relevance of past experience, human rights, the status of women, the family, accessibility and quality of services, the special needs of subpopulations, AIDS, the roles of governments and nongovernmental organizations, community participation, research and data collection, and international cooperation.
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  7. 7
    092021

    Introduction. Review of the six expert group meetings.

    POPULATION BULLETIN OF THE UNITED NATIONS. 1993; (34-35):1.

    On July 26, 1991, the Economic and Social Council resolved to convene an International Conference on Population and Development under the auspices of the UN. To prepare for the conference, 6 expert group meetings were held to address the following issues: 1) population growth, demographic changes, and the interaction between demographic variables and socioeconomic development; 2) population policies and programs, emphasizing the mobilization of resources for developing countries; 3) the interrelationships between population, development, and the environment; 4) changes in the distribution of population; 5) the relationship between enhancing the status of women and population dynamics; and 6) family planning programs, health, and family well-being. A synthesis of these meetings is presented in the 34/35 issue of "Population Bulletin" (1993).
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  8. 8
    064186

    The state of world population 1990: choices for the new century.

    Sadik N

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 1990. 40 p.

    The decade of the 1990's, the Fourth Development Decade, will be "critical" because of the world's demographic situation will determine the future for the 21st century in terms of population growth and the effect of growing populations in terms of damage to the environment. Despite the fact that government political support for population programs and activities rose from 97 countries in 1976 to 125 in 1988 (Africa rose from 16 in 1978 to 30 in 1988), the contraceptive prevalence rates in developing countries (excluding China) during the 1980's fell below 40%. Many countries encountered a "mix" of difficulties maintaining their family planning programs (FP) because of declining political support and the debt burden forcing governments to reduce investments in health and social welfare programs, including FP. By the year 2025 the UN expects 8,467 million people; 147 million (<5%) will be in the industrialized countries and 95% in the developing countries of Africa, Latin America and Asia. This report discusses human resource development during the Fourth Development Decade. FP and population programs must become integral components of countries' development process to achieve sustainable economic growth. 19 recommendations are offered on how to achieve sustained fertility declines. This UNFPA report includes the following sections: Introduction; Part 1 "The Challenges Ahead"; Part 2 "Keeping the Options Open"; Part 3 "Human Resource Development-A New Priority"; Conclusion and Recommendations.
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  9. 9
    054953

    Republic of Korea.

    Hwan CD

    In: Population perspectives. Statements by world leaders. Second edition, [compiled by] United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]. New York, New York, UNFPA, 1985. 187-8.

    Despite considerable economic growth, the government of the Republic of Korea is still experiencing population-related problems. Concern over population problems began in the 1960's. In response to a growing population, the government implemented growth control measures in order to stimulate economic growth. The government has implemented several comprehensive family planning programs which work to encourage Koreans to have smaller families. The country is also experiencing overcrowding in most of its major cities. Present population policies being implemented work to develop rural areas and their industries in an attempt to prevent further migration to the large cities. The government has also begun implementing programs to deal with the aged. The government of the Republic of Korea feels that it is important that comprehensive population policies are developed in order to deal with population problems on regional, national, and international scales.
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  10. 10
    055107

    Yugoslavia.

    Planinc M

    In: Population perspectives. Statements by world leaders. Second edition, [compiled by] United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]. New York, New York, UNFPA, 1985. 175-6.

    10 years after the Bucharest Conference, which adopted the World Plan of Action, there is a second World Population Conference to be held in Mexico. The Conference will deal with considering progress since the Bucharest Conference and new population problems which need to be addressed, with respect to the diversity of the governments and cultures represented in Mexico. The Conference is faced with the prospect of deciding in which manner each country should deal with their population problems in the future. However factors such as inflation, growing debts, and unemployment should not be viewed as secondary to population variables. Factors such as bloc policies and arms races are other reasons for the depletion of funds which could be better used for economic and social development. The country of Yugoslavia is affected by these factors, as well. The government believes that peaceful development, globally, might lead to faster social and economic development in lesser developed countries which experience excessive poverty and population growth. Increase diversity in population problems is of great concern to the Yugoslavian government. However, support of United Nations programs, humanitarian aid from developed countries, and the increasing implementation of the World Plan of Action by various countries encourages the Yugoslavian people. However, it is up to each country to develop and implement its own population policy. Factors such as maternal and infant mortality; status of women; rights of each family to decide the size and spacing of their families; and the well-being of the family should be taken into account.
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  11. 11
    054960

    Democratic Yemen.

    Mohammed AN

    In: Population perspectives. Statements by world leaders. Second edition, [compiled by] United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]. New York, New York, UNFPA, 1985. 48-9.

    In 1983, the population of Yemen was 2,055,000. It was 1,590,000 in 1973 when the first census was taken. The 1973 census is considered the first census since it employed modern means to calculate the population of Yemen. The period before that was characterized by illiteracy and backwardness which prevented any social and economic development. In order to deal with implementing development programmes, the government first had to remove certain social structures. The population policy of Yemen works to improve social and economic factors. Its main thrust is to improve living and working conditions; health care; education; housing; in addition to providing maternal and child care. Due to its democratic make-up, the government looks to include discussion from the people on the development of future and present population programmes. The results are increase in the standard in living, elimination of unemployment, and an increase in school attendance.
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  12. 12
    054959

    Denmark.

    Schluter P

    In: Population perspectives. Statements by world leaders. Second edition, [compiled by] United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]. New York, New York, UNFPA, 1985. 50-1.

    The world rate population growth has decreased slightly over the past decade. However, global development differs from country to country. In some countries, population growth has been replaced by population decline. This particular phenomena is being experienced in developed nations. On the other hand, the developing world is experiencing an alarming population increase, which compromises economic and social development. However, a problem common to both developed and developing countries is an increase in the population of the elderly. It is something that each nation must eventually address in the future. In dealing with present population problems, global cooperation is needed. Bi-lateral and multi-lateral assistance should be emphasized, in addition to programmes implemented by non-governmental organizations. All national programs should take into account the individual rights of all- those who wish to receive family planning services and those who do not. At the center of each population policy should be the improvement of the status of women. The Danish government offers assistance to those countries looking to implement programs which will deal with this particular problem. The government of Denmark looks forward to the World Population Conference to be held in Mexico. It recognizes the importance of reviewing and assessing progress since the Bucharest Conference in 1974.
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  13. 13
    054957

    Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

    San KS

    In: Population perspectives. Statements by world leaders. Second edition, [compiled by] United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]. New York, New York, UNFPA, 1985. 183.

    The government of Korea has formulated its population policy on the basis of the Juche idea, created by President Kim Il Sung. The plan is focused around serving the people and the individual rights of all. Korea, a socialist country, has a planned and managed economy which helps to develop all sectors of the community. The population policy implemented by the government works to help in the development of the whole country. Under the population policy, the government has: controlled overcrowding; improved health and living standards; experienced a decline in the birth rate (31.3/1000 in 1941 to 21.9/1000 in 1982) and mortality rate; and experienced an increased in the average life expectancy (38 years in 1938-1940 to 74 years in 1982). After the war, the government implemented a program to increase births so as to make up its population losses. However, since the 1970's, the government now works to control the rate of births in its country. Concerning women and children, the state provides free education and health benefits. The government strives to work with other socialist countries to promote peace and world free of subjugation.
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  14. 14
    054954

    Portugal.

    Soares M

    In: Population perspectives. Statements by world leaders. Second edition, [compiled by] United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]. New York, New York, UNFPA, 1985. 132.

    The government of Portugal, which has undergone various political transformations, has committed itself to improving the socioeconomic conditions of its country. Population problems, however diverse and numerous, still have an effect on the political, social and economic structure of various world societies. It is of utmost importance that population problems be attacked on a global scale, bearing in mind each nation's sovereign right to deal with their problems, individually. Of special attention to each nation and Portugal, in particular, is the status of women, and internal and external migration. The government of Portugal supports the establishment of an organization that protects the rights of emigrants. It is the hope of the government of Portugal that these problems are addressed at the 1984, World Population Conference.
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  15. 15
    054952

    Iraq.

    Husein S

    In: Population perspectives. Statements by world leaders. Second edition, [compiled by] United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]. New York, New York, UNFPA, 1985. 84-5.

    The president of Iraq wishes to express his best wishes for the success of the 1984 World Population Conference. The government of Iraq believes that the conference requires a great deal of effort to improve present-day problems. Several countries have experienced socioeconomic growth since the 1974 Bucharest Conference; it is necessary that these problems of development be addressed as well. The government of Iraq has paid special attention to its own development problems by addressing such factors as the labor force and the status of women. The government of Iraq has given financial and material aid to developing countries in an attempt to help build up these economies. It is up to the more developed countries to combat world poverty by giving assistance to the less developed. International cooperation is needed to deal with global problems; foreign aggression, as in the case of Israel and Iran, solves nothing - it only creates a state of instability within the Middle East.
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  16. 16
    055080

    The Netherlands.

    Lubbers R

    In: Population perspectives. Statements by world leaders. Second edition, [compiled by] United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]. New York, New York, UNFPA, 1985. 116.

    The government of the Netherlands feels that is the duty and concern of all nations to provide favorable social and economic conditions. The 1984 International Conference on Population in Mexico provides the chance for nations to meet and discuss present day population phenomena. The government of the Netherlands, recognizing the basic rights of couples and individuals concerning birth control, supports a non- intervention policy. However, the Dutch government does give its support to in-depth studies on population control and program implementation in developing countries. The United Nations supports and assists governments implementing population programmes. Central to the U.N. population and development efforts is improving the status of women. However, many member states of the United Nations support the freedom of choice concerning family planning.
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  17. 17
    201743

    Inventory of population projects in developing countries around the world, 1987/88.

    Singh JS; Cuffley CE

    New York, N.Y., United Nations Population Fund, 1989. xi, 902 p. (Population Programmes and Projects v. 2)

    The 15th edition of the INVENTORY shows at a glance, by country, internationally-assisted population projects funded, inaugurated, or being carried out by multilateral, bilateral, and non-governmental and other agencies and organizations during the period from 1 January 1987-30 June 1988. Whenever possible, projects that may have been funded prior to 1987 and that are still being carried out in 1987-1988 are shown. However, it is a good idea to use this INVENTORY in conjunction with the 1986-1987 edition. The 18-month period was used as the base period, since, although there was bound to be some duplication between editions, coverage would be more complete. Entries are grouped by country. Each country listing includes assistance from multilateral organizations, such as the UN Population Fund and the World Health Organization, assistance from non-governmental organizations, demographic facts, and population policies. The basic source of demographic data for individual countries is the WORLD POPULATION PROSPECTS: 1988 REVISION. The basic source of information for the section on government's views on population is the UN Population Division and its publication WORLD POPULATION POLICIES. The dollar value of projects or total country programs is given where such figures are available.
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  18. 18
    050308

    Inventory of population projects in developing countries around the world, 1985/86.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, United Nations Fund for Population Activities, 1987. xi, 826 p. (Population Programmes and Projects, Volume 2.)

    This inventory of population projects in developing countries shows, at a glance, by country, internationally assisted projects funded, inaugurated, or being carried out by multilateral, bilateral, and other agencies and organizations during the reporting period (January 1985 to June 1986). Demographic estimates such as population by sex and by age group, age indicators, urban-rural population, and population density refer to the year end 1985; other estimates such as average annual change, rate of annual change, fertility, and mortality are 5-year averages for 1985-1990. The dollar value of projects or total country programs is given where figures are available. Chapter I provides information on country programs, and Chapter II deals with regional, interregional, and global programs. Chapter III lists sources, including published sources of information and and addresses for additional information and for keeping up-to-date on population activities. Each country profile includes a statement by Head of State of Government on their government's views regarding population, and views of the government on other population matters.
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  19. 19
    129833

    Inventory of population projects in developing countries around the world, 1984/85.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, United Nations Fund for Population Activities, 1986. x, 787 p. (Population Programmes and Projects, Volume 1.)

    This inventory of population projects in developing countries shows, at a glance, by country, internationally assisted projects funded, inaugurated, or being carried out by multilateral, bilateral, and other agencies and organizations during the reporting period (January 1984 to June 1985). Demographic estimates such as population by sex and by age group, age indicators, urban-rural population, and population density refer to 1985; other estimates such as average annual change, rate of annual change, fertility, and mortality are 5-year averages for 1980-1985. The dollar value of projects or total country programs is given where figures are available. Chapter I provides information on country programs, and Chapter II deals with regional, interregional and global programs. Chapter III lists sources, including published sources of information and addresses for additional information and for keeping up-to-date on population activities. Each country profile includes a statement by Head of State or Head of Government on thier government's views regarding population, and views of the government on other population matters.
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  20. 20
    028327

    United Nations International Conference on Population, 6-13 August 19849

    Brown GF

    Studies in Family Planning. 1984 Nov-Dec; 15(6/1):296-302.

    The international Conference on Population, held in Mexico City in August 1984, met to review past developments and to make recommendations for future implementation of the World Population Plan of Action. Despite the several ifferences of opinion, the degree of controversy was minor for an intergovernmental meeting of this size. The 147 government delegations at the Conference reached overall agreement on recommendations for future international commitment to expanding population efforts in the future. This review examines the recommendations of the Mexico Conference with regard to health, family planning, women in development, research, and realted issues. The total 88 recommendations wre intended to reaffirm and refine the World Population Plan of Action adopted in Bucharest in 1974, and to strengthen the Plan for the next decade. Substantial improvement in development was noted including fertility and mortality declines, improvements in school enrollement and literacy rates, as well as access to health services. Economic trends, however, were much less encouraging. While the global rate of population growth has declined slightly since 1974, world population has increased by 770 million during the decade, with 90% of that increase in the developing countries. Part of the controversy at the Conference focused on the remarkable change of position by the US delegation, which largely reversed the policies expressed at Bucharest. The US delegation stated that population was a neutral issue in development, that development is the primary requirement in achieving fertility decline. Several recommendations emphasized the need to integrate population and development planning, and called for increased national and international efforts toward the eradication of mass hunger, illiteracy, and unemployment; achievement of adaquate health and nutrition levels; and improvement in women's status. The need for futher development of management, training, information, education and communication was recognized. A clear call to strenghten global efforts in population policies and programs emerged.
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  21. 21
    026165

    Reflections on population.

    Salas RM

    New York, Pergamon, 1984. 240 p.

    This book, a sequel to "International Population Assistance: The First Decade," characterizes the work of the UN Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) with the developing countries up to 1984, relating these experiences to the issues before the 1984 International Conference on Population. The 1st chapter provides an overview of the significant developments in population up to the 1984 International Conference on Population. The next 7 chapters discuss the following main issues before the Conference and generally reflect the arrangement of the document to be brought before the Conference concerning recommendations for further implementation of the World Population Plan of Action: fertility, status of women and the family; morbidity and mortality; population distribution, internal and international migration; population growth and structure; promotion of knowledge and implementation of policies and programs; international cooperation and the role of UNFPA; and the year 2000 and beyond. Within each of these chapters, excerpts have been arranged in an analytic order, with the aim of facilitating the flow of arguments presented. Appendices contain the 5 "State of World Population Reports" issued from 1980-84 and 7 Rafael M. Salas statements which, primarily due to their focus on the population issues of particular importance to the major regions of the globe, are reproduced in their entirety. This volume reflects the process of population policymaking of the UNFPA with the developing countries in support of their population programs in the past 15 years. These policies were sanctioned and validated, both nationally by the countries themselves and globally by UN deliberative bodies and conferences. The experience of UNFPA in policy formulation indicates that an effective population policy must have its proper time perspective and must be scientifically determined in its component elements, normative and applicable at different levels, multisectoral in its emphasis, and measurable in its impact and consequenes.
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  22. 22
    025567

    The United Nations Conference on Population.

    Salas RM

    Draper Fund Report. 1984 Jun; (13):1-3.

    The UN International Conference on Population to be held in Mexico City in August 1984, responding to an unprecedented upsurge of interest in population over the last decade, offers developed and developing countries the opportunity to assess current and likely future population trends, to comment on programs and progress during the past 10 years, and to determine desirable future directions. More developing countries are reporting diminished declining fertility and family size in countries of widely varying ethnic, social, and economic makeup. Although it is likely that the future will bring a steadily declining rate of world population growth, culminating in stability, present trends indicate that it will take more than a century for world population to stabilize. Meanwhile growth continues. The developing world's annual average birthrate from1975-80 was twice as high as the developed world's. Also there are large areas, much of Latin America and most of Africa, where growth rates continue very high. Other areas, such as parts of Asia, do not follow the general declining trend despite trend despite, in some instances, a long history of population programs. Interest in population programs and demand for resources to support them are growing, but the population dimension is sometimes unrecognized in development planning. The experience of the last decade illustrates that population assistance can make a uniquely valuable contribution to national development when it is given in accord with national policies, is appropriate to local conditions and needs, and is delivered where it can make the most impact. Substantial evidence exists that women in the developing world undertand the risks of repeated pregrancy and would like to take steps to reduce them. It is evident that providers of family planning services are not yet sufficiently responsive to women's own perceptions of their needs and that the social and economic conditions which make family planning a reasonable option do not yet exist. Influxes of immigrants, short and long term, legal and illegal, create particular problems for receiving countries. It is important for sending countries to know what effect the absence of their nationals is having on the domestic economy and essential for receiving countries to consider the protection of the human rights of international migrants, including settlers, workers, undocumented migrants, and refugees. It is a particular responsibility of the industrialized nations to make careful use of limited resources and to ensure that their comsumption contributes to the overall balance of the environment. In most developing countries infectious and parasitic disease remains the primary cause of death, particularly among the young. Much of this toll is preventable. The International Conference on Population provides an opportunity to establish in broad terms the conditions and directions of future cooperation.
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  23. 23
    028004

    Population, development, family welfare. The ILO's contribution

    International Labour Office [ILO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, International Labour Office [ILO], 1984. 56 p.

    This booklet describes the origins, scope, purpose, achievements and perspectives of the ILO's Population and Labour Policies Programme since its inception in the early 1970s as an integral part of the World Employment Programme. Its focus is in the area where population issues and labour and employment concerns intersect. The booklet was produced on the occasion of the International Conference on Population, held in Mexico City in August 1984, but is also intended as a source of information on ILO's population activities for the general reader. Topics covered include the integration of population and development planning, institution building, women's roles and demographic issues, fertility, labor force, migration and population distribution, and motivation through education. (EXCERPT)
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  24. 24
    023931

    An operational strategy for a demographic program in the Sahel.

    Family Health Care; Population Council

    [Unpublished] 1979 Jul 30. 107 p. (Contract No. AID/afr-C-1413)

    This paper provides recommendations to the Sahel Demvelopment Program of the U.S. Agency for International Development concerning an operational strategy for the promotion and development of social services and production have been the development goals of the Sahelian countries since 1960, progress to date has not met expectations. With the exception of Senegal and Mauritania, all the member countries still have per capita gross national products of less than $200 per year. Between 1960-75 the Gambia and Mauritania experienced some growth in their per capita gross national product, while those in the other countries have actually declined. The agricultural sectors are the basis of the national economies, employing 80-90% of the economically active population, and growth of the agricultural sector between 1960-70 has been slow but steady, averaging about 2% annually. The population of region is 28 million, with an age structure in which 45% of the population is under 15 years of age and 55% is between ages 15-64. The Sahel Demographic Research Program has as its objectives: 1) to substantially develop the capacity for demographic data collection, analysis, and research in the Sahel countries; 2) to improve the mechanisms of social and economic development by taking into consideration the interrelations of all social, economic, and demographic variables in the process of development; 3) to contribute to the definition of appropriate population policies that are based on reliable data and can contribute to the rehabilition of the Sahelian ecosystem; 4) to reinforce the scientific and technical cooperation and solidarity between the countries of the area from a self-relian and common perspective of subregional development. To achieve these goals, objectives for a "first generation program" to be undertaken during the period 1978-82 were formulated. The strategy for achieving the objectives should be designed so as to remove the human, physical, and financial resource constraints that are reflected in lack of appropriately trained personnel, institutional networks, financial resources, and coordination at all levels. Successful program impelmentation should result in a team of professional and technical personnel capable of identifying, collecting, analyzing, and utilizing demographic data needed for longterm development planning, systematization of the colleciton, and mechanisms for regional coordination and collaboration. Specifically, the strategy should consist of: 1) institution building and training; 2) establishment of a centralized computer bank; 3) expansion of the demographic database; 4) promotion of the application of demographic data in policy formulation, planning, project design, and evaluation; and 5) publication, dissemination, and translation of research.
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  25. 25
    027327

    Report of the Second African Population Conference: organized in co-operation with the United Nations Fund for Population Activities and the government of the United Republic of Tanzania (Arusha, United Republic of Tanzania, 9-13 January 1984)

    United Nations. Economic Commission for Africa

    Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, United Nations. Economic Commission for Africa [ECA], 1984. 20, [23]; 158, 29 p. (no. ST/ECA/POP/1)

    This two-volume work contains the proceedings of the Second African Population Conference, held in Arusha, Tanzania, in January 1984. Vol. 1 includes summaries of the inaugural address and of the discussions at earlier meetings, a summary of the country statements submitted, and the text of the Kilimanjaro Programme of Action for African Population and Self-Reliant Development. Vol. 2 includes papers on the demographic situation in Africa and future population trends; the relationship between population and development; spatial distribution; family health, welfare, and family planning; the role of women in development; UNFPA assistance programs in Africa; and priorities in population programs in Africa.
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