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Your search found 7 Results

  1. 1
    312809

    UNGASS -- HIV / AIDS: a review of the Brazilian response, 2001-2005.

    Grangeiro A; Ferraz D; Barbosa R; Barreira D; Veras MA

    Revista de Saude Publica / Journal of Public Health. 2006 Apr; 40 Suppl:5-8.

    Recognizing the HIV/AIDS pandemic as an unprecedented worldwide emergency and one of the greatest challenges to life and the enjoyment of human rights, the United nations called on member states to reflect on this matter. In June 2001, around 20 years after the first AIDS cases were recorded, the United Nations General Assembly Special Session on HIV and AIDS (UNGASS HIV/AIDS) was held in New York. The Session culminated in the drafting of the Declaration of Commitment on HIV and AIDS: a document that reflected the consensus between 189 countries, including Brazil, and stated some essential principles for an effective response to the epidemic. The Declaration recognized that economic, racial, ethnic, generational and gender inequalities, among others, were factors that boosted vulnerability and, whether acting separately or in synergy, favored HIV infection and the onset and evolution of AIDS. The Declaration of Commitment on HIV and AIDS has become transformed into a tool for reaffirming the urgency and necessity of promoting the solidarity that the epidemic demands. It aims towards better management of the actions and resources destined for controlling HIV and AIDS and towards social control over public HIV/AIDS policies. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    306659

    Development and testing of the South African National Nutrition Guidelines for People Living with HIV / AIDS.

    Kennedy RD; MacIntyre UE

    SAJCN. South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2003 Feb; 16(1):12-16.

    Malnutrition is a common consequence of HIV infection, and weight loss is used as a diagnostic criterion for HIV/AIDS. The relationship between HIV/AIDS and malnutrition and wasting is well described, with nutritional status compromised by reduced food intake, malabsorption caused by gastrointestinal involvement, increased nutritional needs as a result of fever and infection, and increased nutrient losses. Malnutrition contributes to the frequency and severity of opportunistic infections seen in HIV/AIDS and nutritional status is a major factor in survival. Failure to maintain body cell mass leads to death at 54% of ideal body weight. The effectiveness of nutrition intervention has been documented and dietary nutrition counselling is considered critical in the treatment of HIV/AIDS, especially in view of the fact that drug treatment is inaccessible to many people living with the virus in Africa. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    300923

    AIDS epidemic update. Special report on HIV prevention. December 2005.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]; World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2005 Dec. [96] p. (UNAIDS/05.19E)

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has killed more than 25 million people since it was first recognized in 1981, making it one of the most destructive epidemics in recorded history. Despite recent, improved access to antiretroviral treatment and care in many regions of the world, the AIDS epidemic claimed 3.1 million [2.8--3.6 million] lives in 2005; more than half a million (570 000) were children. The total number of people living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reached its highest level: an estimated 40.3 million [36.7--45.3 million] people are now living with HIV. Close to 5 million people were newly infected with the virus in 2005. There is ample evidence that HIV does yield to determined and concerted interventions. Sustained efforts in diverse settings have helped bring about decreases in HIV incidence among men who have sex with men in many Western countries, among young people in Uganda, among sex workers and their clients in Thailand and Cambodia, and among injecting drug users in Spain and Brazil. Now there is new evidence that prevention programmes initiated some time ago are finally helping to bring down HIV prevalence in Kenya and Zimbabwe, as well as in urban Haiti. The number of people living with HIV has increased in all but one region in the past two years. In the Caribbean, the second-most affected region in the world, HIV prevalence overall showed no change in 2005, compared with 2003. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    297238

    In 2005, AIDS epidemic reaches all-time high.

    Connections. 2006 Feb; [1] p.

    Nearly 5 million people worldwide were infected with HIV in 2005, marking the largest jump in new cases since the disease was first recognized in 1981, according to the AIDS Epidemic Update 2005 released by UNAIDS last December in conjunction with World AIDS Day. The virus claimed the lives of 3.1 million people in 2005, with more than half a million of these deaths occurring among children. Although sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia continue to remain the hardest hit areas, the report clearly indicates that the virus is continuing to spread at alarming rates within Eurasia, bringing the region to the brink of a full-blown epidemic. The number of people living with HIV in Eastern Europe and Central Asia reached 1.6 million in 2005, a 20-fold increase from 2003. Even more striking, AIDS claimed the lives of 62,000 people there last year-nearly double the mortality rate attributed to the virus 2003. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    287146

    The global impact of HIV / AIDS on youth. HIV / AIDS policy fact sheet.

    Kates J; Wilson A; Summer T

    Menlo Park, California, Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2004 Jul. [2] p. (HIV / AIDS Policy Fact Sheet)

    Young people continue to bear the brunt of the global HIV/AIDS epidemic, with youth under age 25 accounting for more than half of all new HIV infections each year. Those between the ages of 15-24 are particularly hard hit, especially girls and young women who comprise the majority of young people living with the disease. Young people face particular vulnerabilities that put them uniquely at risk for HIV, but they are also critical to the response to the epidemic; where HIV transmission has been reduced, the greatest reductions are often seen among young people. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    283996

    Economic analysis of HIV / AIDS. Background paper.

    Bonnel R

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, AIDS Campaign Team for Africa, 2000 Sep. 16 p.

    HIV/AIDS is a major development crisis. Not since the Black Death devastated medieval Europe has humankind observed infectious disease deaths on such a scale. Life expectancies, which rose steadily before the onset of the HIV epidemic, are decreasing in nearly all the 25 countries where the adult prevalence rate exceeds 5 percent. In the countries most heavily affected by HIV/AIDS, life expectancy is projected to fall to about 30 years by 2010– a level not seen since the beginning of the 20th century. Various factors related to poverty, inequality, gender inequality, sexually transmitted infections, social norms, political and social changes, including labor migration, conflicts and ethnic factions have facilitated the rapid spread of HIV. But what has enabled HIV/AIDS to undermine economic and social development is its unprecedented erosion of some of the main determinants of economic growth such as social capital, domestic savings and human capital. For these reasons, the HIV epidemic has been transformed from a health issue into a much wider issue impairing economic and social development. Because it prevents an increasing share of the population from participating in economic growth, the HIV/AIDS epidemic increases poverty. The result is a vicious circle whereby HIV/AIDS reduces economic growth and increases poverty, which in turn accelerates the spread of HIV. Preventing further spread of HIV/AIDS, in addition to providing care and support programs to those both affected and infected by this epidemic, requires early intervention and the mobilization of external resources. The purpose of this paper is to discuss and quantify the economic rationale that underlies such an effort. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    286143

    Adherence and HIV / AIDS.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of HIV / AIDS

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Department of HIV / AIDS, [2004]. [6] p.

    Adherence, “the extent to which a person’s behavior – taking medication, following a diet, and/or executing lifestyle changes, corresponds with agreed recommendations from a health care provider”, is a crucial element for the implementation of the HIV treatment scale-up initiative. Properly taken, HAART (highly active anti-retroviral therapy) has been shown to reduce viral loads, but the requirements for adherence are high – most studies suggest that it has to be higher than 90% to avoid the risk of resistance. (excerpt)
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