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Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    177603
    Peer Reviewed

    The effect of structural characteristics on family planning program performance in Cote d'Ivoire and Nigeria. [Effet des caractéristiques structurelles sur les performances du programme de planning familial en Côte d'Ivoire et au Nigeria]

    Mancini DJ; Stecklov G; Stewart JF

    Social Science and Medicine. 2003 May; 56(10):2123-2137.

    This paper uses Côte d’Ivoire and Nigeria survey data on both supply and demand characteristics to examine how structural and demographic factors influence family planning provision and cost. The model, which takes into account the endogenous influence of service provision on average cost, explains provision well but poorly explains what influences service cost. We show that both size and specialization matter. In both countries, vertical (exclusive family planning) facilities provide significantly more contraception than integrated medical establishments. In the Nigeria sample, larger facilities also offer services at lower average cost. Since vertical facilities tend to be large, they at most incur no higher unit costs than integrated facilities. These results are consistent across most model specifications, and are robust to corrections for endogenous facility placement in Nigeria. Model results and cost recovery information point to the relative efficiency of the International Planned Parenthood Federation, which operates large, mostly vertically organized facilities. (author's)
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  2. 2
    201524

    Family planning in a changing world: an IPPF reappraisal.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, England, International Planned Parenthood Federation, 1987. v, 57, [6] p.

    The present survey of the international environment in which the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) operates shows many advances in family planning, in particular the strong commitment of most governments. But it also confirms that there is still an unmet need on a very large scale and in many countries the gap between knowledge and practice of family planning is striking evidence of the absence of services and of adequate motivation. The resurgence of opposition to family planning and the declining investment in contraceptive research are significant negative trends. A positive development of great importance to IPPF is the strong endorsement of the role of non-governmental organizations, and this represents a special challenge in the years ahead. Family planning associations (FPAs) retain, but could strengthen, their important role as advocates of family planning at the national level, now needed more than ever to counter new forms of opposition. Donors while anxious for FPAs to remain at the cutting edge, are in the main content with the contributions FPAs make as consumer-oriented, voluntary movements for family planning. The importance of IPPF for information, inspiration, and support is now more widely recognized among FPAs. IPPF's general principles include 1) human rights,2) a strong non-governmental role, 3) a voluntary movement, 4) autonomy and responsibility, 5) voluntary and informed choice, 6) advocacy, 7) improved service delivery, 8) increasing demand and practice, 9) meeting the needs of young people, 10) male involvement in family planning, 11) combining family planning with other development activities, 12) management training and program evaluation, 13) resource development at a local level, and 14) long-term planning.
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  3. 3
    026428

    Migrants and planned parenthood.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Europe Region

    London, International Planned Parenthood Federation, Europe Region, 1984 Jun. 122 p.

    Reflections, speculations, and partial evaluations of work already undertaken in the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) Europe Region concerning migrants and planned parenthood are presented. This project, initiated by the Federal Republic of Germany Planned Parenthood Association (PPA), PRO FAMILIA, stemmed from the practical experiences and problems of 1 family planning association in the Europe region. The original substantive framework, consisting of data collection and correspondence, plenary meetings, and subworking group meetings on specific areas of interest, was not altered. Throughout the project, as the work was accomplished, the emphasis shifted to different aspects to migrant work. The 1st questionnaire was intended to provide a sociodemographic profile of the participating countries, a show European migratory movements, and ascertain the ethnicity of the target groups in the different countries. The 2nd questionnaire was related specifically to PPA and/or other family planning center's data and activities and attempted to explore PPA attitudes toward migrant clients, when special facilities for migrants were provided, and whether PPAs felt there was a particular need for such services. The report provides a sociodemographic background of migration in Europe. In addition it includes information from donor countries and recipient countries, examining family planning services in the Federal Republic of Germany and the UK. It also covers training; information, education, and communication; adolescence and 2nd generation migrants; and migrant work. It is necessary to be particularly aware of political sensitivities in treating immigrant fertility regulation. Ideally, the aim is to provide an integrated service for migrants and natives both, catering to individual needs. Until this is feasible, the goal must be to work toward an integrated service, recognizing the needs and providing special services where possible if this is judged tobe the best approach to catering to those needs. Migrant needs must be discovered rather than assumed. Better use should be made of the available printed material, which should be utilized to complement oral information where possible. Experience has shown that family planning personnel working with migrants need additional training. The main components of this training should include self-awareness, insight, and knowledge.
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  4. 4
    024816

    Family planning and health: an evaluation.

    Pomeroy R

    Planned Parenthood Review. 1984 Spring-Summer; 4(1):9-10.

    The Planned Parenthood Federation of America supports international family planning efforts through its affiliation with the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) and the activities of its own International Division, Family Planning International Assistance (FPIA). FPIA is founded on the beliefs that family planning is a basic human right; family planning programs benefit individuals, families, communities, and nations; and family planning along with other needed socieconomic programs can have a major impact on development. Careful timing, spacing, and limiting of births is directly and causally related to improved infant and maternal survival through readily observed and easily explained mechanisms. Mothers in developing countries are anywhere from 10 to 20 or 30 times as likely to die in childbirth as mothers in developed countries. Risks are greatest for mothers under 18 years old, over 30, for those having births within 2 years of a previous birth, and 4th or later deliveries. The differences occur for women at all levels of affluence and access to medical care in all societies, but are particularly sharp in developing countries. Among the poorest countries, 200 or more of every 1000 liveborn infants may die in their 1st year compared to fewer than 10/1000 live births in some wealthy egalitarian countries. The infant mortality rate is so closely related to the overall level of well-being in a country or region that it is regarded as 1 of the most revealing measures of how well a society is meeting the needs of its people. Many of the risk factors for maternal mortality also contribute to infant mortality. Infant mortality in developing countries drops appreciably when women practice family planning and reduce the number of high risk pregnancies. Throughout the developing world, the higher risk infants born to very young or older mothers, mothers with recent previous pregnancies, and mothers with 3 or 4 previous births are 3-10 times more likely to die in their 1st year. Too short birth intervals may threaten the life of the older child through early weaning and resulting increased susceptibility to malnutrition and infection. Careful planning of births through contraception can result in a population better able to contribute economically and less likely to strain the medical resources.
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  5. 5
    258815

    Planned parenthood reconsidered: contribution of family planning to demographic, economic and social goals.

    Tomsic V

    Panel contribution presented at IPPF 21 - Planning for the Future, Brighton, England. 1973 Oct; 7.

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