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  1. 1
    011374

    [Voluntary sterilization in France and in the world] La sterilisation volontaire en France et dans le monde.

    Palmer R; Dourlen-Rollier AM; Audebert A; Geraud R

    Paris, Masson, 1981. 277 p.

    This monograph, directed not only to medical and paramedical personnel but to sterilization seekers as well, touches upon all aspects of voluntary sexual sterilization. The history of sterilization is follwed by a review of female and male anatomy and physiology, and of present available and reversible methods of contraception. All surgical, laparoscopic, tubal, electrocoagulation, culdoscopic, or hysteroscopic methods of female sterilization are described, and results, including morbidity and mortality, complication rates, side effects, and failure rates are presented. This part of the monograph is illustrated with clear and schematic drawings. Problems related to demand for reversal of sterilization are discussed. The same is done for male sterilization, its techniques and complications. The monograph discusses the ever increasing demographic problem in the world , and the role and the extent of voluntary sexual sterilization in industrialized countries and in third world countries, stressing the efforts of those international agencies, such as WHO, IPPF, the Population Council, the European Council, UNFPA, and the World Federation of Associations for Voluntary Sterilization, which promote sterilization around the world, and offer sterilization services. The authors then investigate the role of the physician in the decision to recur to sterilization as a permanent contraceptive method, and in deciding the proper surgical technique. A special chapter discusses the psychological conflicts related to sterilization, especially those which arise before the intervention, and which may very well represent the strongest contraindication to sterilization. A final chapter is devoted to France and to the sociocultural aspects which make sterilization more or less acceptable, the existing legislation, and the professional problems linked to sterilization interventions.
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  2. 2
    803773

    Female sterilization: guidelines for the development of services. 2nd ed.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 1980. 47 p. (WHO Offset Publication No. 26)

    This report outlines the World Health Organization's guidelines for female sterilization techniques. The following conclusions and recommendations concerning individual techniques are discussed: 1) laparotomy, particularly immediately postpartum, is the basic sterilization technique since it can be made available in any surgically equipped facility without extra requirements. 2) minilaparotomy is more demanding in skills and training requirements. However, it is a simple procedure on outpatient basis which makes it suitable for large-scale programs. 3) Colpotomy requires specialized training in obstetrics and gynecology. It has the same advantages as minilaparotomy, but it cannot be used postpartum. 4) Laparoscopy is the most complex sterilization form, and the most expensive. It can be used for sterilization, but its primary role is in diagnosis. 5) Culdoscopy costs slightly less than laparoscopy but has all of the same limitations as laparsocopic method (i.e., expensive, sophisticated university of facilities and training. 6) Hysterectomy is not recommended for sterilization. The need for adequate counseling services in addition to technical expertise is underlined.
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  3. 3
    773960

    Guide to equipment selection for M/F sterilization procedures. Guide du materiel utilise pour les procedures de sterilisation des hommes et des femmes.

    Reingold LA

    Population Reports. Series M: Special Topics. 1977 Sep; (1):[36] p.

    This is a guide to aid in selecting and maintaining the proper equipment used in the following sterilization procedures: 1) minilaparotomy, 2) laparoscopy, 3) conventional laparotomy, 4) colpotomy, 5) culdoscopy, and 6) vasectomy. Prototype, experimental, or infrequently used instruments are not discussed. Colpotomy, minilaparotomy, and conventional vasectomy are low-technology procedures requiring relatively simple, locally produced instruments, e.g., retractors, forceps, and scalpels. High-technology equipment consists of specialized items, e.g., laparoscopes and culdoscopes. These are produced in a limited number of technically advanced countries. Equipment donor agencies are discussed. The following factors must be considered in selecting equipment: 1) suitability for the intended procedures, 2) quality of the instrument, 3) ease of repair, and 4) initial cost. Each type of equipment is pictured, diagrammed, described, and charted against others of its kind. Maintenance and repair guidelines are provided.
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  4. 4
    753681

    Task force on methods for the regulation of ovum transport.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    In: World Health Organization (WHO). World Health Organization expanded programme of research, development, and research training in human reproduction: fourth annual report. Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, November 1975. 33-36. (HRP/75.3)

    Methods of tubal occlusion being studied for use in developing countries are summarized. A comparative clinic trial will be undertaken in the CCCR network to assess safety of tubal occlusion by surgery when performed postpartum through a vertical miniincision and when performed as an interval procedure by minilaparotomy, laparoscopy, colpotomy, or culdoscopy. 8 chemical tubal occluding agents are being studied at the Central Drug Research Institute in India. Postcoital birth control methods are being investigated including: methods to alter the rate of ovum transport, methods of changihg oviduct motility (including the effect of steroids, catecholamine stimulating and blocking agents, prostaglandins, ergot derivatives, and oxytocics), and methods affecting ovum survival. A WHO Symposium on "Ovum Transport and Fertility Regulation" was held in June 1975 in San Antonio, Texas, to present the work of these various scientists.
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