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Your search found 6 Results

  1. 1
    081287

    Installation of a computerized EPI information system, Turkey, May 8-19, 1989.

    Wilson E

    [Unpublished] 1989. [2], 10, [30] p. (USAID Contract No. DPE-5927-C-00-5068-00)

    The Turkish Ministry of Health, Primary Health Care Directorate, Expanded Program on Immunization Division (MOH/EPI), requested technical assistance in the installation of a Computerized EPI Information System (CEIS), which the Resources for Child Health (REACH) Project provided to the MOH/EPI from May 8-May 19, 1989, in Ankara, Turkey. A CEIS was installed to enable the MOH/EPI to process routine vaccination and disease surveillance data and to feed back data to the provinces on EPI vaccine coverage, tetanus toxoid vaccine coverage, and communicable disease incidence. The CEIS provides a standardized format for data entry, report generation, and graph production. It uses FoxBASE+ for the data entry and report production and LOTUS 1-2-3 to produce the graphs. All of the reports, graphs, data entry screens, menus, and prompts were translated into Turkish. Coverage data and disease incidence data for 1988 were entered while the consultant was in Turkey. It was recommended that the MOH/EPI validate the coverage data entered by comparing it with the data contained in its LOTUS 1-2-3 files. The MOH/EPI should enter at least two more years of historical data for both cases and deaths and coverage. This will permit the evaluation of trends in coverage and disease incidence and allow the comparison of intra-year coverage rates and disease incidence. The MOH/EPI should enter current data on a monthly basis and test all of the reporting and graphing capabilities of the system. All of the MDs in the MOH/EPI unit should be trained in the operation of the CEIS. Another technical, assistance visit to Turkey should be made in August 1989 to determine how the CEIS is being used, to correct any flaws in existing programs, and to provide some enhancements identified by the MOH/EPI.
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  2. 2
    075735

    Harbin municipal government experiment on family planning management information system.

    Gao ST

    In: Monitoring and evaluating family planning programmes in the 1990s, [compiled by] United Nations. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific [ESCAP]. Bangkok, Thailand, ESCAP, 1990. 155-67. (Asian Population Studies Series No. 104; ST/ESCAP/945; UNFPA Project No. RAS/86/P09)

    The Harbin Municipal Government administers 7 districts and 2 counties with a total population of 4,020,000 including 1,050,000 women in reproductive age in the northeastern province of Heilongjiang, China. In 1987 an experiment with a family planning (FP) management information system (MIS) was launched in collaboration with the Population Division of the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and Pacific (ESCAP) at the Harbin Population Information Research Institute. The purpose was to upgrade manual information collection to a cohesive information and continuous monitoring system; to improve data collection capacity and utilization for statistical analysis; and to enhance FP services for couples. Specific goals included the establishment of regional (district/county) data bases; to develop MIS components for medicines, population forecasting, and surveys; to expand the data bases for women in reproductive age; and to replace floppy disk exchange with networking. The FP MIS contains the municipal MIS (statistical evaluations for districts to help decision making) and the district MIS (marriage, contraceptive use, parity, and socioeconomic information on women of reproductive age). The implementation started in early 1988; survey forms were designed and revised. In 1989 field implementation entailed marriage, birth and contraceptive histories of 16,000 couples each in an urban and rural unit. Training courses were organized on filling out FP forms. The input of data from 37,000 women took 45 days. The MIS experiment reduced staff workload and increased data utilization, speed, and quality; improved information feedback, the statistical system, and managerial competence. Further refinements of the computer system, technical staff, and family planning training are needed.
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  3. 3
    079138

    Networking of networks: a 1990s approach to information for development.

    ASIA-PACIFIC POPIN BULLETIN. 1992 Jun; 4(2):13-7.

    The ability to access and use information is increasingly becoming a crucial determinant of a country's ability to achieve sustainable socioeconomic development. Countries which are able to manage and utilize data and information have a competitive advantage over other nations. Countries which fail to tap into the growing global knowledge base, develop a complementary local knowledge base, promote the dissemination and use of knowledge, and invest in institutional and technical human capital will, however, simply remain or fall behind the competition. Many developing countries lack appropriate strategy, financial support for information centers and networks, timely adoption and use of new technology, adequate telecommunications infrastructure, and coordination at national and regional levels. Further, telecommunications services are costly, research on user group behavior is inadequate, few technically skilled people are available, and governments fail to recognize the importance of joining international information networks. Policy development, maternal-child health and family planning, and information, education, and communication are 3 of the most significant population issues worldwide. To best address these issues, international development agencies are urged to veer from providing capital and to directly support greater access to information and enhanced knowledge leading to sustainable national development. Thus far the UN has helped create global information systems in certain areas, and regional cooperative information systems are being developed. ESCAP has taken the lead in Asia and the Pacific. Gradually, population libraries and information centers are becoming computerized. Greater effort is recommended to recover costs for services and products. Further, donors and country organizations should stress that information is only useful as far as it is used.
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  4. 4
    267312

    Report on developments and activities related to population information during the decade since the convening of the World Population Conference, Bucharest, 1974.

    Hankinson R

    New York, United Nations, 1984 Jun. vi, 52 p. (POPIN Bulletin No. 5 ISEA/POPIN/5)

    A summary of developments in the population information field during the decade 1974-84 is presented. Progress has been made in improving population services that are available to world users. "Population Index" and direct access to computerized on-line services and POPLINE printouts are available in the US and 13 other countries through a cooperating network of institutions. POPLINE services are also available free of charge to requestors from developing countries. Regional Bibliographic efforts are DOCPAL for Latin America. PIDSA for Africa, ADOPT and EBIS/PROFILE. Much of the funding and support for population information activities comes from 4 major sources: 1) UN Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA): 2) US Agency for International Development (USAID); 3) International Development Research Centre (IRDC): and 4) the Government of Australia. There are important philosophical distinctions in the support provided by these sources. Duplication of effort is to be avoided. Many agencies need to develop an institutional memory. They are creating computerized data bases on funded projects. The creation of these data bases is a major priority for regional population information services that serve developing countries. Costs of developing these information services are prohibitive; however, it is important to see them in their proper perspective. Many governments are reluctant to commit funds for these activites. Common standards should be adopted for population information. Knowledge and use of available services should be increased. The importance os back-up services is apparent. Hard-copy reproductions of items in data bases should be included. This report is primarily descriptive rather than evaluative. However, given the increase in population distribution and changes in government attitudes over the importance of population matters, the main tasks for the next decade should be to build on these foundations; to insure effective and efficient use of services; to share experience and knowledge through POPIN and other networks; and to demonstrate to governments the valuable role of information programs in developing national population programs.
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  5. 5
    020022

    In-service training on population/family planning information system, 19 May-9 July 1981, Bangkok.

    Thailand. Ministry of Public Health. National Family Planning Program. Thai Population Clearing-House / Documentation Centre

    Bangkok, Thailand, Ministry of Public Health. National Family Planning Programme, Thai Population Clearing House/Documentation Centre, [1981]. 321 p. (ASEAN Australian Project No. 3 Developing/Strengthening National Population Information Systems and Networks in ASEAN Countries: Thailand)

    This report provides several modules for developing information management skills in population information. After describing the main functions of the ESCAP Population Division Clearing House and Information Section, and the Population Education Clearing House of Unesco, the report breaks down the training program into the following sections: technical processes (acquisitions, cataloging and classification, and preservation); literature searching; abstracting; collection development; collection maintenance; networking; library automation; and information storage and retrieval. Each module is accompanied by training exercises; the section on technical processes contains a glossary.
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  6. 6
    023536

    The NAPRALERT data base an an information source for application to traditional medicine.

    Farnsworth NR

    In: Bannerman RH, Burton J, Ch'en Wen-Chieh. Traditional medicine and health care coverage: a reader for health administrators and practitioners. Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization, 1983. 184-93.

    It has been estimated that from 25 to 75 thousand species of higher (flowering) plants exist on earth. Of these only about 1% are acknowledged through scientific studies to have real therapeutic value when used in extract form by humans. A computerized data base on the chemistry and pharmacology of natural products is available. The data base is maintained in the Department of Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, University of Illinois, at the Medical Center, and has been given the acronym NAPRALERT (Natural Products ALERT). A systematic surveillance of the world literature on the chemistry and pharmacology of natural products has been in progress since 1975. In addition, a substantial amount of retrospective information has been acquired and computerized on selected genera of plants and on the pharmacological activities of natural products. These retrospective searches extend back into the mid 1700s. The major fields covered in the NAPRALERT system are 1) the organism record; 2) work types; 3) compound record; 4) pharmacology record; and 5) demographic record. There are 2 major areas in which traditional medicine can be served through the use of NAPRALERT: data retrieval and problem solving. Since most problems in traditional medicine are regional ones, it is possible to program the NAPRALERT data base to respond primarily to questions concerning plants of a specific country, or within a given continent. Recently the NAPRALERT base has been made available to individuals, industrial firms, academic institutions and government agencies with a modest fee calculated on the basis of actual computer time required to generate data output, the cost of copying the material and the mailing costs. In the near future, NAPRALERT will be approaching international funding agencies to enlist their cooperation in financing a 10 year program that will allow them to computerize all of the world literature on natural products as far back as 1900. This will be an enormous effort, which cannot be effectively accomplished without direct cooperation from interested scientists and institutions in developing countries. A plan for obtaining that objective is outlined.
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