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Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    311840
    Peer Reviewed

    Implementation of the WHO Multicentre Growth Reference Study in India.

    Bhandari N; Taneja S; Rongsen T; Chetia J; Sharma P

    Food and Nutrition Bulletin. 2004; 25 Suppl 1:S66-S71.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Multicentre Growth Reference Study (MGRS) Asian site was New Delhi, India. Its sample was drawn from 58 affluent neighborhoods in South Delhi. This community was selected to facilitate the recruitment of children who had at least one parent with 17 or more years of education, a key factor associated with unconstrained child growth in this setting. A door-to-door survey was conducted to identify pregnant women whose newborns were subsequently screened for eligibility for the longitudinal study, and children aged 18 to 71 months for the cross-sectional component of the study. A total of 111,084 households were visited over an 18-month period. Newborns were screened at birth at 73 sites. The large number of birthing facilities used by this community, the geographically extensive study area, and difficulties in securing support of pediatricians and obstetricians for the feeding recommendations of the study were among the unique challenges faced by the implementation of the MGRS protocol at this site. (author's)
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  2. 2
    166733

    Fear stalls health push in India.

    Dugger CW

    New York Times on the Web. 2002 Mar 4; [5] p..

    In India, the death of a 2-year old boy named Wahidur and some 30 other children has halted the vitamin A campaign supported by UN International Children's Emergency Fund. Rumors spread that the vitamin A supplementation has caused the death, causing fear among the people. However, investigation by public health officials revealed that it was not vitamin A that killed many of the children but rather by common sickness like diarrhea and pneumonia. In addition, laboratory tests determined that the vitamin syrup met all the standards. Studies have shown that vitamin A sharply reduces the chances of death of many malnourished youngsters in developing countries due to diarrhea, measles and other diseases. It also helps prevent blindness. According to Dr. Alfred Sommer, an epidemiologist and dean of the Bloomberg School of Public Health at John Hopkins University, an estimated tens of thousands of Indian children would die needlessly if the vitamin A campaign is not restored.
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  3. 3
    266347

    Family planning communication reach study.

    Waliullah S; Nessa S

    Dacca, Bangladesh, Directorate of Population Control and Family Planning Research, Evaluation, Statistics and Planning Wing, April 1977. 30 p.

    Upon completion of a report on Research Inventory and Analysis of Family Planning Communication Research in Bangladesh, the convenor of Task Force II proposed a study on Family Planning Communication Audience, a top priority study, as documented by the Task Force II in its report submitted earlier to the government. The objectives of this study are to: 1) examine if 2 steps or a multi-step communication model is in operation in Bangladesh; 2) determine which of the media has the largest audience; 3) determine the contribution of each of the mass media in disseminating the family planning message; and 4) determine socioeconomic characteristics of various media audiences. The sample design included exposure to 5 mass media: newspapers, television, radio, audiovisual van, and village bard. The study shows that: 1) both groups of respondents (male and female) have been exposed to the mass media in varying degrees, but that the audiences, after receiving the message, did not keep it confined to themselves; 2) the 2 and 3 step model of communication is in operation in the sample population; 3) in terms of exposure, the data show that radio had larger audiences among both male and female respondents; 4) newspapers, radio, and television audiences differ from the audiences of the other 2 media--village bard, and audiovisual van--in the following areas: education, age, income, and parity. Recommendations are made for further development of family planning communication programs through the mass media: 1) More news, advertisements, pictures, and features printed in the daily newspapers "Ittefaq," and "Dainik Bangla," which are widely read by rural populations; 2) installation of radios and television sets at public sites will enable public service announcements on family planning to be viewed; 3) the musical drama, "Jatragan," by the village bard is highly effective in delivering the family planning message; 4) future studies should include control groups for each of the 5 media audiences; and 5) since women cannot join men in viewing the audiovisual van performances, special arrangement should be made for them.
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  4. 4
    167030

    Population programs in the post Bucharest era: toward a third pathway.

    Korten DC

    Cambridge, Mass., Harvard Institute for International Development, Dec. 1975. 53 p. (Development Discussion Paper No. 9)

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