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Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    311839
    Peer Reviewed

    Implementation of the WHO Multicentre Growth Reference Study in Ghana.

    Lartey A; Owusu WB; Sagoe-Moses I; Gomez V; Sagoe-Moses C

    Food and Nutrition Bulletin. 2004; 25 Suppl 1:S60-S65.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Multicentre Growth Reference Study (MGRS) African site was Accra, Ghana. Its sample was drawn from 10 affluent residential areas where earlier research had demonstrated the presence of a child subpopulation with unconstrained growth. This subpopulation could be identified on the basis of the father's education and household income. The subjects for the longitudinal study were enrolled from 25 hospitals and delivery facilities that accounted for 80% of the study area's births. The cross-sectional sample was recruited at 117 day-care centers used by more than 80% of the targeted subpopulation. Public relations efforts were mounted to promote the study in the community. The large number of facilities involved in the longitudinal and cross-sectional components, the relatively large geographic area covered by the study, and the difficulties of working in a densely populated urban area presented special challenges. Conversely, the high rates of breastfeeding and general support for this practice greatly facilitated the implementation of the MGRS protocol. (author's)
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  2. 2
    174496

    Truck drivers help pregnant women.

    BBC News. World Edition. 2002 Dec 9; [3] p..

    Villagers in parts of Western Africa have come up with an ingenious way of helping pregnant women get to hospital. They place yellow flags on the side of major roads to literally flag down passing truck drivers. The drivers transport the women to hospital, which can sometimes be hundreds of miles away. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    174388

    Check HIV spread in children, urges UNICEF.

    Nyaranga N

    East African Standard. 2002 Dec 14; [2] p..

    United Nations Children's Fund (Unicef) has asked the Government to take urgent action to protect children against increasing HIV/Aids infection. And Unicef has expressed concern that over 50 per cent of orphans in Kenya are out of school. Unicef Kenya Officer in charge of Hiv/Aids Unit, Ms Margaret Kyenka Isabirye, said four out of every ten children born to HIV positive mothers are infected. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    080888

    Women and AIDS in Zimbabwe.

    Ray S

    In: Tradition and transition: NGOs respond to AIDS in Africa, edited by Mary Anne Mercer, Sally J. Scott. Baltimore, Maryland, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Institute for International Programs, 1991 Jun. 15-22.

    Many people at risk of HIV infection are changing their behavior drastically when they are referred for HIV testing, as a result of more access to information. Featured as a theme for World AIDS Day, women are particularly vulnerable, since they have less power than men to influence their interpersonal relationships. Women with HIV/AIDS often are asked to make the unrealistic decision to avoid childbearing, but the status of a women in Africa depends on her reproductive ability. The traditional role of women as caregivers both as professional health workers, or in home care, is critical in HIV/AIDS disease. Preservation of the health of the 5-14 age group, who is uninfected, is a priority. Adolescents must be specially targeted in preventive counseling on the consequences of early sexual activity such as teenage pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases. Sex education in the schools should start at a much earlier age. Studies in Zimbabwe show that women are being infected 5-10 years earlier than men, and there are even cases in 15, 16, and 17 year old women. Most HIV-infected people are afraid of being ostracized or fired from jobs. Women have lost their jobs when their HIV status became known, although the Minister of Health has issued a directive that HIV infection is not a valid reason for discharging an employee. Women are especially vulnerable because they may be rejected by their families and their partners, while having small children who also may be infected. Empowerment of women is needed so that destructive relationships do not continue only because of economic dependence. Ministries of Health, Labor, and Social Welfare need to develop strategies with NGOs to cope with demand to find resources for increasing numbers of desperate people. Community-based care is ideal, and positive trends are emerging to combat the destructive effects of AIDS that divide families leaving the most vulnerable uncared for.
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