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  1. 1
    040281

    [Workshop on Sensitization of Communication Professionals to Population Problems, Dakar, 29 August, 1986 at Breda] Seminaire atelier de sensibilisation des professionnels de la communication aux problemes de population, Dakar du 25 au 29 Aout 1986 au Breda.

    Senegal. Ministere du Plan et de la Cooperation

    Dakar, Senegal, UNICOM, Unite de Communication, 1986. 215 p. (Unite de Communication Projet SEN/81/P01)

    This document is the result of a workshop organized by the Communication Unit of the Senegalese Ministry of Planning and Cooperation to sensitize some 30 Senegalese journalists working in print and broadcast media to the importance of the population variable in development and to prepare them to contribute to communication programs for population. Although it is addressed primarily to professional communicators, it should also be of interest to educators, economists, health workers, demographers, and others interested in the Senegalese population. The document is divided into 5 chapters, the 1st of which comprises a description of the history and objectives of the Communication Unit, which is funded by the UN Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA). Chapter 1 also presents the workshop agenda. Chapter 2 provides an introduction to population problems and different currents of thought regarding population since Malthus, a discussion of the utilization and interpretation of population variables, and definitions of population indicators. The 3rd chapter explores problems of population and development in Senegal, making explicit the theoretical concepts of the previous chapter in the context of Senegal. Topics discussed in chapter 3 include the role of UNFPA in introducing the population variable in development projects in Senegal; population and development, the situation and trends of the Senegalese population; socioeconomic and cultural characteristics of the Senegalese population; sources of sociodemographic data on Senegal; the relationship between population, resources, environment and development in Senegal; and the Senegalese population policy. Chapter 4 discusses population communication, including population activities of UNESCO and general problems of social communication; a synthesis and interpretation of information needs and the role of population communication; and a summary of the workshop goals, activities, and achievements. Chapter 5 contains annexes including a list of participants, opening and closing remarks, an evaluation questionnaire regarding the workshop participants, and press clippings relating to the workshop and to Senegal's population.
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  2. 2
    273042

    Report on the Preparatory Technical Consultation for the Meeting of ASEAN Heads of Population Programmes held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 22-24 November 1976.

    Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations [FAO]; Regional Organization for Inter-Governmental Cooperation and Coordination in Population and Family Planning in Southeast Asia [IGCC]

    [Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia], Regional Organization for Inter-Governmental Cooperation and Coordination in Population and Family Planning in Southeast Asia, 1976. 248 p.

    The Preparatory Technical Consultation for the Meeting of ASEAN Heads of Population Programs was held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, from November 22-24, 1976. It was organized by the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the Regional Organization for Inter-Governmental Cooperation and Coordination in Population and Family Planning in Southeast Asia. Sponsorship was also received from the United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA). From Nov. 24-26 the Meeting of ASEAN Heads of Population Programs hosted by ASEAN, Malaysia, and the National Family Planning Board of Malaysia (NFPB) was held. They met to exchange views and to compare experiences regarding population problems and programs, particularly those related to rural and urban under-privileged sectors; to define common needs of ASEAN population programs, and to delineate the likely thrust of population policies in the Region for the coming 10 years. The proposals for action which came from the discussions of the Preparatory Technical Consultation covered policy, programs, strategies, research, training, information, education, and communication. Particular emphasis was given to activities extending beyond traditional family planning approaches.
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  3. 3
    065518

    Population Information Network for Africa.

    United Nations. Economic Commission for Africa. Population Division. Population Information Network for Africa [POPIN Africa]

    Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, UNECA, 1990 Apr. [4], 23 p. (RAF/88/P16)

    POPIN-Africa, or Population Information Network for Africa, was conceived in 1982 and designed to enable ECA (UN Economic Commission for Africa) member states to develop national information centers and infrastructures to support their policies of development planning. It allows information to be standardized and encourages formulation of sound population policies based on accurate information. POPIN-Africa is a decentralized network comprising National Population Information Centers, (NPICs), and Subregional/Sectoral Participating Centers linked by a Coordinating Unit (CU). Associated are an Advisory Committee (PAAC), a Technical Working Group (PAT), and a Working Group on Information Dissemination and Diffusion (PAWID). Major services of POPIN-Africa include documentation in the form of Country Bibliography Series, Databases, Training, a Clearinghouse, news agencies and media links for dissemination of information. Publications include African Population Profile, African Director of Demographers, Popindex-Africa, POPIN-Africa Country Bibliography Series, African Population Newsletter, POPIN-Africa Info, and Scanning Sheet.
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  4. 4
    058904

    Report on the evaluation of Indonesia country programme.

    Chee S; Kittle D; Pullum TW; Rimon JG 2d; Sarvaas CD; Munthe-Kaas AC

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 1988 Nov. [2], xvii, 81 p.

    A mission team evaluated the UNFPA supported country program in Indonesia for 4 weeks in 1988. The team found that country program staff had progressed greatly towards institution building and had sufficiently upgraded its capacity, both primary goals in the design of the program. On the other hand, the evaluators observed that the program did not sufficiently emphasize or consider women's issues, except a project for income generation among women's acceptor groups. No comprehensive record of income generating programs exists, however, and should be developed. 4 population dynamics research projects involved improving individual and institutional capability to conduct research in development and implementation of population policies. In addition, the program also supported training programs and computer equipped resource centers at 2 university centers. The team noted, however, that research and analyses should also be conducted using the available primary data, e.g., census data and annual surveys. Even though the 2 projects in strengthening family planning management and operations research have basically achieved their goals, they need to foster linkage between the 2 and to include gender issues in their designs. Indonesia has been successful in delivery of family planning services through community involvement and women's group. Nevertheless, some areas of improvement include development of a transport policy to continue and expand family planning services and investigating the potential for NORPLANT production in Indonesia. In terms of education and communication, the program has satisfactorily focused on motivating couples and youth to use contraceptives. Yet it needs to know its target audiences better so as to develop more effective materials and presentations.
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  5. 5
    063310

    Population information, education and communication [sectoral paper].

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    [Unpublished] 1989 Nov. 148 p. (A/E/BD/4/Sec. III)

    Population information, education and communication (IEC) are essential ingredients to promote awareness and understanding of population issues. Population information is the technical and statistical information used to create awareness of population issues among governments, NGO's, communities, families and individuals. This report is a comprehensive overview of IEC activities in population programs. The section on population information includes listing of all available publications and a history of population information centers and networks by region. The priorities for future population information activities include: 1) improving data bases and research; 2) linking population to environmental and other development issues; 3) identifying the role of women in population and development; 4) reiterating the case for family planning; 5) attracting and maintaining media attention and political commitment; and 6) applying new technology to population information programs. The section on population education discusses the early development of introducing and institutionalizing formal educational programs. The major issues in the future are: 1) awareness creation and sensitization; 2) coordination with other groups and sectors; 3) training; 4) conceptualization of population education; 5) content; 6) student grade levels; 7) materials; 8) evaluation and research; 9) institutionalization. There are also lessons to be learned from the section on non-formal population. The final section on population communications (PC) discusses lessons from 9 major different types of programs. The major issues for the future of PC are: qualitative research techniques; health educators/communicators; social marketing; language sensitivity; coordinated messages; target groups; opposition to population; institutionalization; technological advances; human sexuality and family size norms.
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  6. 6
    267402

    The United Nations' flawed population policy.

    Huessy PR

    Washington, D.C., Heritage Foundation, 1984 Aug 27. 16 p. (Backgrounder No. 376)

    The United Nations' 2nd World Population Conference (Mexico City, 1984) called for greatly expanding funding for family planning assistance worldwide. The United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA), the conference's chief sponsor, will no doubt receive the largest portion of any assistance increase. UNFPA plays a critical role in population-related programs worldwide. The central debate on population policy should be over the extent and adequacy of the natural resources base and how countries can humanely and voluntarily change family size preferences. In countries like Singapore and South Korea, success has been achieved by combining social and economic incentives to discourage large families. Although couples in developing countries report wanting contraceptive service programs, they also want families of 4 to 6 children. So far UNFPA has been ineffective in changing the population situation. This overview of its activities reveals that UNFPA loses ultimate reponsibility for implementation of many of its own programs. UNFPA does not advocate a reduction in population growth within a single country, but rather helps couples have the number of children they desire. UNFPA's specific population and family programs are divided into functional areas: basic data collection, population change study, formulation and implementation of population policies, support for family planning/maternal child health programs and educational and communication programs. UNFPA stresses the importance of using contraceptives but not of achieving the small family norm. UNFPA's projects in some of the largest less developed nations are described, illustrating how the UN agency spends its assistance funds. From 1971 to 1982, the UNFPA spent almost US $230 million in the 10 largest less developed countries without any significant change in population growth. UNFPA program administrators are far from resolving the serious population problems facing developing countries and generally oblivious to new directions in which population policies should move. No progress will be made until UNFPA recognizes the need to approach the problem from a different perspective, working to change attitudes toward small families.
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  7. 7
    037462

    Ecuador: report of Mission on Needs Assessment for Population Assistance.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, UNFPA, Sept. 1981. 62 p. (Report; no. 46)

    Summary of the findings of the Mission on Needs Assessment for Population Assistance which visited Ecuador from April 7 to May 6, 1980. Discussions were held with officials of Government Ministries and Offices and with private agencies working in the areas of interest to the UNFPA at this time. UN agencies and other donors, in particular the US Agency for International Development, were consulted as well. The summary includes reviews of the national setting, population trends and their implications, population policies, development planning, basic population data, social, economic and demographic research, education and communication programs, external assistance, and recommendations.
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  8. 8
    007288

    Afghanistan: report of Mission on Needs Assessment for Population Assistance.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, UNFPA, 1978 Jun. 53 p. (Report No 3)

    The present report presents the findings of the Mission which visited Afghanistan from October 3-16, 1977 for the purpose of assessing the country's needs for population assistance. Report focus is on the following: the national setting (geographical, cultural, and administrative features; salient demographic, social, and economic characteristics of the population; and economic development and national planning); basic population data; population dynamics and policy formulation; implementing population policies (family health and family planning and education, communication, and information); and external assistance (multilateral and bilateral). The final section presents the recommendations of the Mission in detail. For the past 25 years Afghanistan has been working to inject new life into its economy. Per capita income, as estimated for 1975, was $U.S. 150, a relatively low figure and heavily skewed in favor of a very small proportion of the population. The country is still predominantly rural (85%) and agricultural (75%). In the absence of reliable data, population figures must be accepted tentatively. According to the 7-year plan, the population in 1975 was 16.7 million and the rate of growth around 2.5% per annum. The crude birth rate is near 50/1000 and the crude death rate possibly 25/1000. The Mission endorses the priority given by the government to the population census and recommends continued support on the part of the United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) to help the Central Statistical Office in the present effort and in building up capacity for future work. The Mission recommends that efforts be concentrated on the reduction of infant, child, and maternal mortality levels and that assistance be continued to the family health services and to programs of population education. Emphasis should be on services to men and women in rural areas. The Mission also recommends a training program for traditional birth attendants.
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  9. 9
    007250

    Republic of the Gambia: report of Mission on Needs Assessment for Population Assistance.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, UNFPA, 1981 Oct. 59 p. (Report No 44)

    The findings of the Mission that visited the Republic of the Gambia during October 1978 and from August 27th to September 5th, 1980 for the purpose of assessing the need for population assistance are presented in this report. Information is provided on the following: the national setting (geographical and governmental features; demographic, social, and economic characteristics of the population; and population policy and development planning); basic population data (censuses and surveys, vital statistics and civil registration, other data collection activities, and needs); population policy formulation (population growth and distribution, integration of population factors into development plans, and structures for policy formulation; and implementing population policies (programs designed to affect fertility, mortality, and morbidity; programs affecting the distribution of the population; information, education, and communication programs; and women's programs); and external assistance (multilateral and bilateral assistance and nongovernmental organization assistance). Mission recommendations are both summarized and presented in detail. The total population of the country is 597,000, and the population growth rate between 1963-1973 was an estimated 2.8%. The crude birth rate is 49-50/1000 and the total estimated fertility rate is an average of 6.4 live births/woman over her reproductive life span. Both population density and urban growth are serious concerns. Internal and international migration are influencing the population distribution, although data regarding migration are limited. The economy is primarily agricultural. Gambia had no formal population policy until 1979. The current population is based on the guiding principles that population policy should be considered part of rural development and that the goal of self-reliance should be pursued. Improved management, administration, logistics, transport, and supervision to support the existing and all future health care service systems of the country are critical needs. Training is needed for various categories of health personnel.
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  10. 10
    007249

    Solomon Islands: report of Mission on Needs Assessment for Population Assistance.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, UNFPA, 1981 Oct. 71 p. (Report No 43)

    A comprehensive assessment of basic needs for assistance to enable the Solomon Islands to achieve self-reliance in the population aspects of its national development is presented in this report. This report outlines the findings of the Mission that visited the Solomon Islands from November 28th to December 13th, 1979. The 9 sections of the report focus on the following: the national setting (geographical, governmental, and cultural features; demographic, social, and economic characteristics; socioeconomic development and national planning; and population objectives and development plans); basic population data; population policy formulation and dynamics; implementing population policies (health and family planning); education, information, and communication; and special programs and community development; external assistance (multilateral and bilateral assistance and nongovernmental organizations); and recommendations for population assistance. Solomon Islands, which achieved independence in 1978, has a population of 196,823 and a population growth rate of 3.4%. The draft of the 1980-1984 National Development Plan details sectoral goals that exceed the country's financial capacity, and construction delays and the limited availability of skilled local manpower severely inhibit the country's absorptive capacity for external assistance. The most pressing needs for population assistance are for projects that would have an impact on the socioeconomic factors that influence population variables--factors such as income-earning opportunities and capacities, women's status, education and training, and community development. The Mission recommends the development of a vital registration system and social statistics system. As there is no coherent national policy with regard to population size, growth, and distribution, it is recommended that a program be developed that would combine activities to raise the awareness of decision makers concerning the importance of population policy in development planning.
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  11. 11
    021300

    Republic of Korea: report of Mission on Needs Assessment for Population Assistance.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, UNFPA, April 1982. 81 p. (Report; no. 47)

    Korea has seen a rapid growth in both population and economy over the last 2 decades. Rapid urbanization along with high population density has been pushing people towards Seoul. The government wishes to control this migration and the natural increases in population. The excellent progress in family planning over the last 20 years is described. Modern contraceptive methods are available for free or for a nominal charge in clinics that are staffed by predominantly nonmedical personnel. The population problem is still great, and the authors suggest several means to reorganize family planning institutions. In general, the hopes of this reorganization rest on careful compilation and analysis of demographic factors, expansion of already present health care facilities, extention of medical insurance to lower income groups, restructuring of budgeting monies to doctors and family planning workers, and the more liberal use of incentives and population education.
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  12. 12
    023698

    Thailand: report of Second Mission on Needs Assessment for Population Assistance.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, May 1983. 74 p. (Report No. 55)

    Reports on the need for population assistance in Thailand. Areas are identified which require assistance to achieve self-reliance in formulating and implementing population programs. Thailand has had a family planning program since 1970 and UNFPA has been assisting population projects and programs in Thailand since 1971. A Basic Needs Assessment Mission visited the country in April 1981. Thailand is experiencing a rapid decline in the population growth rate and mortality rates have been declining for several decades. The Mission makes recommendations for population assistance and identifies priority areas for assistance, such as population policy formation; data collection; demographic research; health and family planning; population information, education, and communication; and women and development. The Mission recommends that all population efforts be centralized in a single agency with no other function. Thailand is also in need of more personnel in key agencies dealing with population matters. The Mission also recommends that external aid be sought for technical assistance and that population projections be revised based on the 1980 census. Thailand has made a great deal of progress in developing its health infrastructure and services, but some problems still remain, especially in areas of staff recruitment and deployment and in providing rural services. The Mission also recommends that external assistance be continued for short term training seminars and workshops abroad for professionals. Seminars should be organized to assist officials in understanding the importance of population factors in their areas.
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  13. 13
    027674

    Africa.

    Katongole R

    New York, N.Y., United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA] [1983] 54 p. (Population Profiles No. 20)

    This review traces how various population programs in Africa have evolved since the 1960s. Before the establishment of the United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) in the late 1960s, the efforts of private groups or non-governmental organizations in the areas of family planning, are highlighted. The vital contribution of private donors in facilitating the work of the Fund in Africa is given emphasis throughout the review. Early studies show that family planning activities in Africa, and governmental population policies fall into a definite pattern within the continent and that the distribution of colonial empires was a major determinant of that pattern. In most of Africa, the 1st stirrups of the family planning movement began during the colonial period. During the 1960s there was marked increase in the demand for family planning services. Lack of official government recognition and not enough assistancy from external sources made early family planning programs generally weak. The shortage of trained personnel, the unsureness of government support, opposition from the Roman Catholic Church to population control, and the logistics of supplying folk in remote rural areas who held traditional attitudes, all posed serious problems. The main sectors of the Fund's activities are brought into focus to illustrate the expansion of population-related programs and their relevance to economic and social development in Africa. The Fund's major sectors of activity in the African region include basic data collection on population dynamics and the formulation and implementation of policies and programs. Family planning, education and communication and other special programs are also important efforts within the Fund's multicector approach. The general principles applied by UNFPA in the allocation of its resources and the sources and levels of current finding are briefly discussed and the Fund's evaluation methodology is outlined. A number of significant goals have been achieved in the African region during the past 15 years through UNFPA programs, most prominently; population censuses, data collection and analysis, demographic training and reseaqrch, and policy formulation after identification of need. This monograph seeks to provide evidence for the compelling need for sustained commitment to population programs in Africa, and for continuing international support and assistance to meet the unmet needs of a continent whose demographic dynamism is incomparably greater than that of any other part of the world.
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