Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 16 Results

  1. 1
    273042

    Report on the Preparatory Technical Consultation for the Meeting of ASEAN Heads of Population Programmes held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 22-24 November 1976.

    Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations [FAO]; Regional Organization for Inter-Governmental Cooperation and Coordination in Population and Family Planning in Southeast Asia [IGCC]

    [Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia], Regional Organization for Inter-Governmental Cooperation and Coordination in Population and Family Planning in Southeast Asia, 1976. 248 p.

    The Preparatory Technical Consultation for the Meeting of ASEAN Heads of Population Programs was held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, from November 22-24, 1976. It was organized by the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the Regional Organization for Inter-Governmental Cooperation and Coordination in Population and Family Planning in Southeast Asia. Sponsorship was also received from the United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA). From Nov. 24-26 the Meeting of ASEAN Heads of Population Programs hosted by ASEAN, Malaysia, and the National Family Planning Board of Malaysia (NFPB) was held. They met to exchange views and to compare experiences regarding population problems and programs, particularly those related to rural and urban under-privileged sectors; to define common needs of ASEAN population programs, and to delineate the likely thrust of population policies in the Region for the coming 10 years. The proposals for action which came from the discussions of the Preparatory Technical Consultation covered policy, programs, strategies, research, training, information, education, and communication. Particular emphasis was given to activities extending beyond traditional family planning approaches.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    070792

    Developing communication strategies and programs: a systematic approach.

    Elkamel F

    Amman, Jordan, UNICEF, Middle East and North Africa Region, 1986 Feb 28. xi, 98 p.

    This handbook is intended help improve the effectiveness of development programs through the appropriate use of communication and social marketing strategies and techniques. UNICEF developed the handbook in order to better utilize communication and social marketing in the achievement of Child Survival and Development goals. The handbook has 3 functional uses: it can serve as a guide for planning and implementing development programs; it can be used as an evaluation and monitoring tool by both program administrators or outside evaluators; and it can serve as a textbook in training workshops designed to improve communication skills -- particularly with respect to public health issues. The handbook begins with an conceptual discussion of communication and social marketing. The handbook then provides 10 interdependent modules involved in the development of a communication or social marketing program: problem identification, audience analysis, examining social factors, identifying obstacles, setting objectives, developing a strategy, material production, pretest and piloting, launching and monitoring, and evaluation. Additionally, the handbook contains the following appendices that can be useful in fulfilling one the handbook's 3 functions: exercises, a sample of a survey questionnaire, a sample of a pretest questionnaire, a sample of a moderator's guide for a focus-only group, request for proposals, a sample request for proposals, a sample of a proposal evaluation sheet, audit of evaluation research, an assessment checklist for research and evaluation reports or proposals, a checklist of contract provisions, media selection and mix matrix, and other additional aids.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    068551

    USAID steps up anti-AIDS program.

    USAID HIGHLIGHTS. 1991 Fall; 8(3):1-4.

    This article considers the epidemic proportion of AIDS in developing countries, and discusses the U.S. Agency for International Development's (USAID) reworked and intensified strategy for HIV infection and AIDS prevention and control over the next 5 years. Developing and launching over 650 HIV and AIDS activities in 74 developing countries since 1986, USAID is the world's largest supporter of anti-AIDS programs. Over $91 million in bilateral assistance for HIV and AIDS prevention and control have been committed. USAID has also been the largest supporter of the World Health Organization's Global Program on AIDS since 1986. Interventions have included training peer educators, working to change the norms of sex behavior, and condom promotion. Recognizing that the developing world will increasingly account for an ever larger share of the world's HIV-infected population, USAID announced an intensified program of estimated investment increasing to approximately $400 million over a 5-year period. Strategy include funding for long-term, intensive interventions in 10-15 priority countries, emphasizing the treatment of other sexually transmitted diseases which facilitate the spread of HIV, making AIDS-related policy dialogue an explicit component of the Agency's AIDS program, and augmenting funding to community-based programs aimed at reducing high-risk sexual behaviors. The effect of AIDS upon child survival, adult mortality, urban populations, and socioeconomic development in developing countries is discussed. Program examples are also presented.
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    059738

    Report of the Meeting on HIV Infection and Drug Injecting Intervention Strategies, Geneva, 18-20 January 1988.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Global Programme on AIDS

    [Unpublished] 1989. 12 p. (WHO/GPA/SBR/89.1)

    To reduce the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, new and innovative strategies must be developed for reaching intravenous drug abusers. Drug injection is the risk factor in at least 21% of cases of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in Europe and 25% of US AIDS cases. Moreover, a major proportion of heterosexual AIDS cases in developed countries are a result of sexual contact with an HIV- infected intravenous drug abuser. At a meeting organized by the World Health Organization's Global Program on AIDS in January 1988, the following approaches were identified as effective for HIV risk reduction among this population: 1) outreach programs that provide education and social support to drug injectors who are attempting to change their behavior; 2) access to sterile needles and syringes in return for used injection equipment; 3) information on the decontamination of drug injection equipment, e.g., through bleaching; and 4) wider use of methadone and other detoxification methods to decrease the prevalence of the drug addiction problem. Given the numerous problems inherent in contacting drug abusers for testing and treatment programs, community outreach programs independent of the formal health care system are needed. The greatest success has been achieved in outreach efforts that involve former drug addicts who are familiar with the life-style and needs of drug injectors. The staff of drug treatment programs within the health care system needs education on the promotion of safe sex practices, condom and virucide use, and family planning techniques. Voluntary testing of drug injectors for antibodies to HIV can provide essential data on the prevalence and incidence of HIV infection in this population and provides an opportunity for counseling; mandatory testing is not warranted, however.
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    058904

    Report on the evaluation of Indonesia country programme.

    Chee S; Kittle D; Pullum TW; Rimon JG 2d; Sarvaas CD; Munthe-Kaas AC

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 1988 Nov. [2], xvii, 81 p.

    A mission team evaluated the UNFPA supported country program in Indonesia for 4 weeks in 1988. The team found that country program staff had progressed greatly towards institution building and had sufficiently upgraded its capacity, both primary goals in the design of the program. On the other hand, the evaluators observed that the program did not sufficiently emphasize or consider women's issues, except a project for income generation among women's acceptor groups. No comprehensive record of income generating programs exists, however, and should be developed. 4 population dynamics research projects involved improving individual and institutional capability to conduct research in development and implementation of population policies. In addition, the program also supported training programs and computer equipped resource centers at 2 university centers. The team noted, however, that research and analyses should also be conducted using the available primary data, e.g., census data and annual surveys. Even though the 2 projects in strengthening family planning management and operations research have basically achieved their goals, they need to foster linkage between the 2 and to include gender issues in their designs. Indonesia has been successful in delivery of family planning services through community involvement and women's group. Nevertheless, some areas of improvement include development of a transport policy to continue and expand family planning services and investigating the potential for NORPLANT production in Indonesia. In terms of education and communication, the program has satisfactorily focused on motivating couples and youth to use contraceptives. Yet it needs to know its target audiences better so as to develop more effective materials and presentations.
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    063310

    Population information, education and communication [sectoral paper].

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    [Unpublished] 1989 Nov. 148 p. (A/E/BD/4/Sec. III)

    Population information, education and communication (IEC) are essential ingredients to promote awareness and understanding of population issues. Population information is the technical and statistical information used to create awareness of population issues among governments, NGO's, communities, families and individuals. This report is a comprehensive overview of IEC activities in population programs. The section on population information includes listing of all available publications and a history of population information centers and networks by region. The priorities for future population information activities include: 1) improving data bases and research; 2) linking population to environmental and other development issues; 3) identifying the role of women in population and development; 4) reiterating the case for family planning; 5) attracting and maintaining media attention and political commitment; and 6) applying new technology to population information programs. The section on population education discusses the early development of introducing and institutionalizing formal educational programs. The major issues in the future are: 1) awareness creation and sensitization; 2) coordination with other groups and sectors; 3) training; 4) conceptualization of population education; 5) content; 6) student grade levels; 7) materials; 8) evaluation and research; 9) institutionalization. There are also lessons to be learned from the section on non-formal population. The final section on population communications (PC) discusses lessons from 9 major different types of programs. The major issues for the future of PC are: qualitative research techniques; health educators/communicators; social marketing; language sensitivity; coordinated messages; target groups; opposition to population; institutionalization; technological advances; human sexuality and family size norms.
    Add to my documents.
  7. 7
    037700

    Expanding the CSDR in the industrialized world.

    Konig U

    Assignment Children. 1984; (65/68):37-42.

    The potential for the Child Survival and Development Revolution (CSDR) can only be realized, and a significant reduction in the infant mortality achieved, if all forces are mobilized worldwide. In industrialized countries, it is essential that the general public become aware of the recent breakthroughs in social development, and that the potential only now exists to reduce infant mortality and to improve child development on the basis of a combination of new knowledge and communication capacities that now exist in developing countries. National Committees for UNICEF, meeting in Rome in October 1984, developed lines of action for disseminating the CDSR message to the public in their respective countries and in mobilizing public opinion, NGOs and governments. A 3-point action plan was drawn up, to include awareness-raising through the diffusion of the CSDR message to target groups (media, opinion leaders); through an assessment in each of their countries of immunization levels, breastfeeding, and growth monitoring practices and advocacy with NGOs working on behalf of children in developing countries so that the measures recommended by UNICEF are included in their projects.
    Add to my documents.
  8. 8
    037694

    The demand approach for the child survival and development revolution.

    Vittachi VT

    Assignment Children. 1984; (65/68):13-20.

    The central idea behind UNICEF's rubric of the Child Survival and Development Revolution (CSDR) is to enable parents to protect their children from preventable death an disablement. The CSDR strategy takes the demand approach, which opens the possibilities for parents to see what they should and could do to "grow" their children better. The concept of demand implies supply and therefore goes 1 step further than the concept of needs, spoken of for years in the development literature. Demand is often latent demand. The "demand" for good health and survival of a child is covered over by a widespread perception o fFate, the only explanation available to most people to help them bear their suffering. It is possible to change the climate of fatefulness through the media and the influential members of the community and to communicate the mssage that Fate is not Destiny, thus introducing the possibility of acting to change that Fate. What is therefore needed is to communicate the information and knowledge needed to bring about that change, thereby converting latent demand into articulate and effective demand to which supply is the response. 3 fronts are identified to carry out such a CSDR program: 1) training effective communicators of the CSDR message; 2) producing adequate program communication materials of sensitive and direct relevance to particular communities and 3) responding to the demand raised by hving supplies at hand. To make good on the promise of the CSDR, society needs to be mobilized, the political will stimulated and the professional will, active. Social mrketing is a new idea which is being adopted by UNICEF. It is an integral element of its program of social communication as are also public information and program communication. All 3 elements are integral to UNICEF's main programs of child development and survival.
    Add to my documents.
  9. 9
    027444

    [Background document for the International Conference on Population, Mexico City, August 1984]

    Association for Contraceptive Counselling and Related Areas [ACCRA]

    [Unpublished] 1984 Aug. Background note presented at the International Conference on Population, Mexico City, August 6-13, 1984. 5 p. (E/CONF.76/NGO/16)

    The Association for Population/Family Planning Libraries and Information Centers- - International (APLIC) exists to foster, encourage, and implement population information activities, including publication, collection, and dissemination of population-related literature. Abstract journals, computerized on-line and printout services, computerized data bases. Population Bibliography, and popline and a global population information network, (POPIN) have been developed in the last decade. Decrying contraints placed on the free flow of population information in some countries, APLIC urges the conference participants to recognize the importance of providing uncensored current population information to all who need it and can use it, and to continue support, financial and otherwise, for the population information structure developed over the past decade at the international, regional, and national levels.
    Add to my documents.
  10. 10
    027345

    Shared sexual responsibility: a strategy for male involvement in United States Family Planning clinics.

    Andrews D

    In: International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Male involvement in family planning: programme initiatives. London, England, IPPF, [1984]. 167-76.

    Reviewed here are the efforts of the Planned Parenthood affiliates in the United States, showing that their focus is on female contraception. The author argues that if family planning is to be seen as a basic human right, then far more attention needs to be given to shared sexual responsibility. Although major strides have been made through federal grants and education programs, the history of meaningful male involvement has been a feeble one. It is argues that the alarming rate of teenage pregnancies, the falling statistics in vasectomy services across the country and the overall image of family planning programs, are indicative of the need for a new strategy. The little research data that is available shows that the earlier young men and boys are reached with accurate sexuality information, the more successful family planning and education services will be. The most successful sex education programs seem to be those which see sexuality education as a life-long process. More recently, research has concluded that programs working with parents and children are by far the most successful in ensuring ongoing dialogue and most meaningful behavior change. An important strategy for reaching males, partucularly with condoms, is to build on current strength in reaching female populations. Active promotion of vasectomy services, increased availability of comdom products suitably packaged and promoted, and attention-getting public service announcements, have combined to help change the image of a family planning program too often thought of as exclusively female. A representative sample of educational materials for men is included in the appendix.
    Add to my documents.
  11. 11
    037617

    Communication for population and family welfare programmes: the role of Unesco.

    UNESCO

    Paris, France, Unesco Press, 1981. 29 p.

    UNESCO's population program involves communication. Since 1974, the program has stressed the importance of studying the interrelationsihps between demographic and socioeconomic factors and of integrating population activities with overall development efforts. The Regional Advisor's Offices play a vital role in the program. These advisors and their staff are currently in Bangkok, Thailand; Beirut, Lebanon; Dakar, Senegal; Nairobi, Kenya; and Santiago, Chile. 2 groups require training in population communication; those who are communications and media specialists, and those who are in population-related activities. To train these people, UNESCO organizes courses and workshops; inserts courses into the curricula of universities that train communication specialists; sends people abroad on fellowships; and organizes study tours. UNESCO supports research with implications for population communication. The agency's assistance in planning, administration and evaluation areas takes 2 main forms: providing advisory services; and issuing publications on the subject. Publications and films are listed at the end. UNESCO is involved in experimentation with: 1) communication materials and techniques in pilot projects; 2) development of communication materials aimed at general or target audiences in specific countries; and 3) development of communication materials for use in training programs. In the area of communication, several women's projects are under way. Another form of UNESCO support for population communication is the diffusion and exchange of information and materials. UNESCO should continue to expand its support for population communication activities; training will remain a pressing need. Particular groups will need to be addressed and specific issues dealt with, as will population distribution, and the relationship between population concerns and human rights. Specific suggestions are given as to when, where, and how UNESCO can be useful.
    Add to my documents.
  12. 12
    037462

    Ecuador: report of Mission on Needs Assessment for Population Assistance.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, UNFPA, Sept. 1981. 62 p. (Report; no. 46)

    Summary of the findings of the Mission on Needs Assessment for Population Assistance which visited Ecuador from April 7 to May 6, 1980. Discussions were held with officials of Government Ministries and Offices and with private agencies working in the areas of interest to the UNFPA at this time. UN agencies and other donors, in particular the US Agency for International Development, were consulted as well. The summary includes reviews of the national setting, population trends and their implications, population policies, development planning, basic population data, social, economic and demographic research, education and communication programs, external assistance, and recommendations.
    Add to my documents.
  13. 13
    007288

    Afghanistan: report of Mission on Needs Assessment for Population Assistance.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, UNFPA, 1978 Jun. 53 p. (Report No 3)

    The present report presents the findings of the Mission which visited Afghanistan from October 3-16, 1977 for the purpose of assessing the country's needs for population assistance. Report focus is on the following: the national setting (geographical, cultural, and administrative features; salient demographic, social, and economic characteristics of the population; and economic development and national planning); basic population data; population dynamics and policy formulation; implementing population policies (family health and family planning and education, communication, and information); and external assistance (multilateral and bilateral). The final section presents the recommendations of the Mission in detail. For the past 25 years Afghanistan has been working to inject new life into its economy. Per capita income, as estimated for 1975, was $U.S. 150, a relatively low figure and heavily skewed in favor of a very small proportion of the population. The country is still predominantly rural (85%) and agricultural (75%). In the absence of reliable data, population figures must be accepted tentatively. According to the 7-year plan, the population in 1975 was 16.7 million and the rate of growth around 2.5% per annum. The crude birth rate is near 50/1000 and the crude death rate possibly 25/1000. The Mission endorses the priority given by the government to the population census and recommends continued support on the part of the United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) to help the Central Statistical Office in the present effort and in building up capacity for future work. The Mission recommends that efforts be concentrated on the reduction of infant, child, and maternal mortality levels and that assistance be continued to the family health services and to programs of population education. Emphasis should be on services to men and women in rural areas. The Mission also recommends a training program for traditional birth attendants.
    Add to my documents.
  14. 14
    021300

    Republic of Korea: report of Mission on Needs Assessment for Population Assistance.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, UNFPA, April 1982. 81 p. (Report; no. 47)

    Korea has seen a rapid growth in both population and economy over the last 2 decades. Rapid urbanization along with high population density has been pushing people towards Seoul. The government wishes to control this migration and the natural increases in population. The excellent progress in family planning over the last 20 years is described. Modern contraceptive methods are available for free or for a nominal charge in clinics that are staffed by predominantly nonmedical personnel. The population problem is still great, and the authors suggest several means to reorganize family planning institutions. In general, the hopes of this reorganization rest on careful compilation and analysis of demographic factors, expansion of already present health care facilities, extention of medical insurance to lower income groups, restructuring of budgeting monies to doctors and family planning workers, and the more liberal use of incentives and population education.
    Add to my documents.
  15. 15
    023698

    Thailand: report of Second Mission on Needs Assessment for Population Assistance.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, May 1983. 74 p. (Report No. 55)

    Reports on the need for population assistance in Thailand. Areas are identified which require assistance to achieve self-reliance in formulating and implementing population programs. Thailand has had a family planning program since 1970 and UNFPA has been assisting population projects and programs in Thailand since 1971. A Basic Needs Assessment Mission visited the country in April 1981. Thailand is experiencing a rapid decline in the population growth rate and mortality rates have been declining for several decades. The Mission makes recommendations for population assistance and identifies priority areas for assistance, such as population policy formation; data collection; demographic research; health and family planning; population information, education, and communication; and women and development. The Mission recommends that all population efforts be centralized in a single agency with no other function. Thailand is also in need of more personnel in key agencies dealing with population matters. The Mission also recommends that external aid be sought for technical assistance and that population projections be revised based on the 1980 census. Thailand has made a great deal of progress in developing its health infrastructure and services, but some problems still remain, especially in areas of staff recruitment and deployment and in providing rural services. The Mission also recommends that external assistance be continued for short term training seminars and workshops abroad for professionals. Seminars should be organized to assist officials in understanding the importance of population factors in their areas.
    Add to my documents.
  16. 16
    048849

    Evaluation of population education projects executed by the ILO in the Asia and Pacific region: general conclusions and recommendations.

    Matthews P; Roque F; Valdivia L; McWilliam J

    New York, New York, United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA], 1983 Dec. xiii, 27, [8] p.

    The United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) has provided funds over the past decade to the International Labor Organization (ILO) or to Governments to undertake population education activities directed at the organized sector. About 44% of this assistance has gone to UNFPA-funded regional and country projects in the Asia and Pacific Region. In order to assess these projects, a review of 21 projects took place and 8 projects in 3 countries (Bangladesh, India, Nepal) were visited by Evalutation Missions. The Missions found that the main immediate objective for all projects was to stimulate awareness and interest in family planning and to support population education. All projects but one were directed at industrial workers, and the provision of family planning was explicitly stated as an objective in 2 projects. All projects had a goal to institutionalise population education as a part of the agency/ministry implementing the projects. The Mission concluded that the greatest effect of these types of projects had been in the change of attitude and behavior of top and middle level management toward family planning for their workers, as illustrated by conduct of in-plant classes for population education on company time and provision of incentives for family planning acceptors. At the worker level, as a result of the extensive training activities, there is now a large cadre of trained worker motivators in many industrial establishments who can influence fellow workers and potentially other members of the community to accept family planning. However, no information was available, except for 2 projects evaluated, to assess the effects of the projects on contraceptive use. It was noted that some projects had focused mainly on groups already motivated towards family planning; more emphasis should be put on reaching audiences not yet motivated for family planning. The institutionalization of population education within the implementing agents of the projects is likely to be achieved in most of the projects evaluated, although this objective cannot be fully evaluated at this point in time. General conclusions and recommendations were made in 4 areas: planning of projects, approach to reach the organized sector, implementation of projects and administration of projects.
    Add to my documents.