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  1. 1
    051468

    Science and Technology for Development: Prospects Entering the Twenty-First Century. A symposium in commemoration of the twenty-fifth anniversary of the U.S. Agency for International Development, Washington, D.C., June 22-23, 1987.

    United States. Agency for International Development [USAID]; National Research Council

    Washington, D.C., National Academy Press, 1988. 79 p.

    This Symposium described and assessed the contributions of science and technology in development of less developed countries (LDCs), and focused on what science and technology can contribute in the future. Development experts have learned in the last 3 decades that transfer of available technology to LDCs alone does not bring about development. Social scientists have introduced the concepts of local participation and the need to adjust to local socioeconomic conditions. These concepts and the development of methodologies and processes that guide development agencies to prepare effective strategies for achieving goals have all improved project success rates. Agricultural scientists have contributed to the development of higher yielding, hardier food crops, especially rice, maize, and wheat. Health scientists have reduced infant and child mortalities and have increased life expectancy for those living in the LDCs. 1 significant contribution was the successful global effort to eradicate smallpox from the earth. Population experts and biological scientists have increased the range of contraceptives and the modes for delivering family planning services, both of which have contributed to the reduction of fertility rates in some LDCs. Communication experts have taken advantage of the telecommunications and information technologies to make available important information concerning health, agriculture, and education. For example, crop simulation models based on changes in temperature, humidity, precipitation, wind, solar radiation, and soil conditions have predicted outcomes of various agricultural systems. An integration of all of the above disciplines are necessary to bring about development in the LDCs.
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  2. 2
    040281

    [Workshop on Sensitization of Communication Professionals to Population Problems, Dakar, 29 August, 1986 at Breda] Seminaire atelier de sensibilisation des professionnels de la communication aux problemes de population, Dakar du 25 au 29 Aout 1986 au Breda.

    Senegal. Ministere du Plan et de la Cooperation

    Dakar, Senegal, UNICOM, Unite de Communication, 1986. 215 p. (Unite de Communication Projet SEN/81/P01)

    This document is the result of a workshop organized by the Communication Unit of the Senegalese Ministry of Planning and Cooperation to sensitize some 30 Senegalese journalists working in print and broadcast media to the importance of the population variable in development and to prepare them to contribute to communication programs for population. Although it is addressed primarily to professional communicators, it should also be of interest to educators, economists, health workers, demographers, and others interested in the Senegalese population. The document is divided into 5 chapters, the 1st of which comprises a description of the history and objectives of the Communication Unit, which is funded by the UN Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA). Chapter 1 also presents the workshop agenda. Chapter 2 provides an introduction to population problems and different currents of thought regarding population since Malthus, a discussion of the utilization and interpretation of population variables, and definitions of population indicators. The 3rd chapter explores problems of population and development in Senegal, making explicit the theoretical concepts of the previous chapter in the context of Senegal. Topics discussed in chapter 3 include the role of UNFPA in introducing the population variable in development projects in Senegal; population and development, the situation and trends of the Senegalese population; socioeconomic and cultural characteristics of the Senegalese population; sources of sociodemographic data on Senegal; the relationship between population, resources, environment and development in Senegal; and the Senegalese population policy. Chapter 4 discusses population communication, including population activities of UNESCO and general problems of social communication; a synthesis and interpretation of information needs and the role of population communication; and a summary of the workshop goals, activities, and achievements. Chapter 5 contains annexes including a list of participants, opening and closing remarks, an evaluation questionnaire regarding the workshop participants, and press clippings relating to the workshop and to Senegal's population.
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  3. 3
    273042

    Report on the Preparatory Technical Consultation for the Meeting of ASEAN Heads of Population Programmes held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 22-24 November 1976.

    Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations [FAO]; Regional Organization for Inter-Governmental Cooperation and Coordination in Population and Family Planning in Southeast Asia [IGCC]

    [Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia], Regional Organization for Inter-Governmental Cooperation and Coordination in Population and Family Planning in Southeast Asia, 1976. 248 p.

    The Preparatory Technical Consultation for the Meeting of ASEAN Heads of Population Programs was held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, from November 22-24, 1976. It was organized by the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the Regional Organization for Inter-Governmental Cooperation and Coordination in Population and Family Planning in Southeast Asia. Sponsorship was also received from the United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA). From Nov. 24-26 the Meeting of ASEAN Heads of Population Programs hosted by ASEAN, Malaysia, and the National Family Planning Board of Malaysia (NFPB) was held. They met to exchange views and to compare experiences regarding population problems and programs, particularly those related to rural and urban under-privileged sectors; to define common needs of ASEAN population programs, and to delineate the likely thrust of population policies in the Region for the coming 10 years. The proposals for action which came from the discussions of the Preparatory Technical Consultation covered policy, programs, strategies, research, training, information, education, and communication. Particular emphasis was given to activities extending beyond traditional family planning approaches.
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  4. 4
    052045

    Final report: First Caribbean Health-Communication Roundtable, St. Philip, Barbados, 16-18 November 1987.

    Pan American Health Organization [PAHO]; Caribbean Community [CARICOM]

    [Unpublished] 1987. [4], 30, [49] p.

    To create a mechanism from which to mobilize communications media as a force for health in the Caribbean, the 1st Caribbean Health Communication Roundtable was held in 1987. Organized and initiated by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and cosponsored by UNESCO and the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), the summary of the objectives discussed at the roundtable are presented in this report. Objectives include sensitizing the media to the health concerns of AIDS, disaster preparedness, nutrition and chronic diseases, and the examination of different types of health communication methodologies. Roundtable participants drafted a series of recommendations for submission to all relevant national, regional, and international agencies. 6 major recommendations covered various aspects of health communication. Workshops at the national and sub-regional level to train media and communications specialists were a suggested means of improving information techniques for health educators. Improvements in coordination and cooperation between Ministries of Health and Ministries of Information, requested by CARICOM, was recommended to strengthen health communication. The addition of an information specialist to the staff of the PAHO office was recommended, as well as the promotion of alternative communication methods and practices. Establishing a regional center for the identification, collection, cataloging, and dissemination of communication ideas, experiences and other resources was another major recommendation. In addition, evaluation of regional communication projects was suggested. Pre- and post-Roundtable questionnaires are reproduced in the Appendices, as are the program schedule, rationale, and list of participants.
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  5. 5
    055333

    Towards effective family planning programming.

    Dondi NN

    Nairobi, Kenya, Family Planning Association of Kenya, 1980. [5], 164 p.

    The proceedings of the Second Management Seminar for senior volunteers and staff of the Family Planning Association of Kenya (FPAK), held in December 1979, with appendices, are presented. The 1st 3 days consisted of lectures and plenary discussions on topics such as communication strategies, family guidance, youth problems, and contraceptive methods; the last 2 days were group discussions, reports and summary evaluations. 40 participants took part in the evaluation, expressing satisfaction with knowledge gained in communications, family life education, and IPPF organization and skills. They expressed the need to learn more about family counseling, youth problems, population, and integrated approaches. The seminar recommended that FPAK be more innovative to retain volunteers, plan its communication strategy more carefully, train and involve volunteers in programming, study traditional family planning methods, provide family counseling services, fully exploit the media, and use it to clarify misconceptions and introduce community-based distribution.
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  6. 6
    054773

    Health-related population issues: report of a study group, Brazzaville, 7-9 October 1985.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for Africa

    Brazzaville, Congo, World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for Africa, 1985. vi, 78 p.

    This is a report from a meeting held to consider questions relating to the implementation of family planning as part of integrated services with maternal and child health programs. The geographic focus is on Africa. Consideration is given to nutritional and ecological problems, women's roles in family planning programs, education and communication in family planning, and WHO's program of research in human reproduction. (ANNOTATION)
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  7. 7
    027444

    [Background document for the International Conference on Population, Mexico City, August 1984]

    Association for Contraceptive Counselling and Related Areas [ACCRA]

    [Unpublished] 1984 Aug. Background note presented at the International Conference on Population, Mexico City, August 6-13, 1984. 5 p. (E/CONF.76/NGO/16)

    The Association for Population/Family Planning Libraries and Information Centers- - International (APLIC) exists to foster, encourage, and implement population information activities, including publication, collection, and dissemination of population-related literature. Abstract journals, computerized on-line and printout services, computerized data bases. Population Bibliography, and popline and a global population information network, (POPIN) have been developed in the last decade. Decrying contraints placed on the free flow of population information in some countries, APLIC urges the conference participants to recognize the importance of providing uncensored current population information to all who need it and can use it, and to continue support, financial and otherwise, for the population information structure developed over the past decade at the international, regional, and national levels.
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  8. 8
    266125

    The proceeding of the Evaluation Workshop for the five UNFPA-assisted projects, 8-9 June 1979, Seoul, Korea.

    Planned Parenthood Federation of Korea [PPFK]

    Seoul, Korea, PPFK [1979]. 25 p.

    This monograph is a summary of a 2-day workshop of the Planned Parenthood Federation of Korea. The projects discussed at the workshop included 5 pilot programs sponsored through the United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA). The 5 target projects concerned the promotion of family planning. The procedures for this promotion included using day care centers for family planning education, as well as planning publication of a newsletter for young working people. Other projects include the development of educational materials, slide shows and public advertising. Also developed were programs to provide counseling, education and distribution of birth control for both the urban poor and the isolated agricultural population. The conclusions of the workshop emphasized the initial success of the program in all its phases for the year of its existence. Research, however, pointed out the need to increase educational outreach programs.
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  9. 9
    261076

    [An education policy for IPPF's Western Hemisphere Region--considerations and recommendations of 1977 I&E Seminars] Una politica de educacion para la Region del Hemisfero Occidental de la IPPF--consideraciones y recomendaciones de los Seminarios de IyE 1977.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Edited by R. Jaimes. New York; IPPF, Western Hemisphere Region, 1978. 52 p.

    The New Educational Policy views family planning education as a longterm activity designed to stimulate social change within the context of social and economic development. In theory many governments in this region recognize family planning as a human right. As a result of a study of IPPF and its future, it was concluded that though it would continue to include service delivery, this would not be its main task. Its main activities would be to lead, to be a testing ground, to develop new approaches. One main goal of family planning is integration. There is the need to link family planning with those services and programs in the community with which it can relate. It must be kept in mind that information and education are the front line of family planning service. Family planning must care about the family as a whole. To extend the participation of volunteer workers, the need to be aware of the priorities of other organizations must be stressed, thus laying the ground work for the long term success of family planning. Research is needed for program development. Financial and technical help is needed to start new education programs, for training, and for educational aids. The needs of the non-English speaking territories in the Caribbean must be realized. Volunteers and personnel within a family program must learn to communicate effectively. Therefore, they must be provided with orientation and training in the basics of family planning and human relations. It was also stressed that programs should be promoted in rural and marginal areas. It is necessary to raise the professional and budgetary status of Information and Education departments.
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  10. 10
    017567

    Report of the regional meeting on social and cultural factors affecting the acceptance, continuation and discontinuation of family planning practice.

    United Nations. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific [ESCAP]

    New York, New York, United Nations, 1983. 32 p. (Asian Population Studies Series No. 56)

    The Regional Meeting on Social and Cultural Factors Affecting the Acceptance, Continuation and Discontinuation of Family Planning Practice was held at Pattya, Thailand from November 2 to 8, 1982. Objectives identified at the meeting were: 1) to review and exchange information among the countries of the region on the factors affecting the acceptance, continuation and discontinuation of family planning practice; 2) to recommend, on the basis of available experience in the region, strategies and experimental measures for overcoming the critical communication as well as other social and cultural barriers adversely affecting the practice of family planning; 3) to enhance regional cooperation in conducting further necessary research on the sociocultural factors affecting decision making on the use continuation of contraceptive methods by suggesting an appropriate conceptual framework and guidelines for a methodology in conducting such regional or subregional studies; 4) to suggest strategies for promoting improved evaluation and monitoring systems for family planning programs which take into account the extent and nature of the continuation and discontinuation of family planning practice. 8 countries participated: Bangladesh, India, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Thailand. Recommended communication strategies to facilitate the continuation of family planning practice are: 1) improvement of the instructional or counseling activities by family planning personnel concerning technical information on contraceptive methods to counteract unfavorable rumors on contraceptive use. 2) Utilizing mass media and interpersonal channels to reinforce directly the continuance of family planning practice, as an alternative to simply promoting 1st acceptance. 3) Counteract unfavorable rumors related to contraceptive use by identifying influential persons at key locations in the communication networks of local communities and by having them serve as "trouble shooters" should unfavorable rumors arise. 4) Organize communication to increase the level of social support for acceptors of family planning. Design special communication strategies to increase acceptability of a small family norm, and to decrease fatalistic attitudes toward pregnancy and childbirth.
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  11. 11
    019594

    Association for population/family planning libraries and information centers-international (APLIC).

    Shipman PE

    Popin Bulletin. 1983 Apr; (4):1-8.

    Population centers and their information units or libraries were established as early as the 1920s, but population evolved as a field of study in its own right mainly during the 1950s and 60s. This paper attempts not so much to describe all that has taken place in the population information field to date, as to describe the activities of the Association for Population/Family Planning Libraries and Information Centers-International (APLIC). It is 1 of 2 international associations of population/family planning information specialists; the other is POPIN, in whose establishment APLIC played a key role. Membership can be either individual or institutional. At present there are 129 members from all parts of the globe. APLIC's goal is to make population, demographic, and family planning information available in the most effective way to researchers, policy-makers, clinicians, administrators, and program practitioners throughout the world. Its efforts are focused on 5 major areas: 1) the development of effective documentation and information systems and services; 2) professional contact among population librarians, documentalists, and information and communication specialists; 3) the global exchange of population information through programs and activities; 4) a cooperative network of population documentation centers and libraries; 5) continuing education to encourage professional development. Every year since 1968, APLIC has held a conference at which a diverse number of international and national information topics have been dealt with, and at which there have been working committees and information panels. Other activities include the publication of a newsletter, inter-library loans, reference services, and other matters relating to respective parent organizations.
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