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  1. 1
    068677

    Population education in the nineties: a quest for a regional programme strategy in Asia and the Pacific.

    POPULATION EDUCATION IN ASIA AND THE PACIFIC NEWSLETTER AND FORUM. 1991; (34):12-7.

    In 1990, Asia and the Pacific constituted 59% of the world's population and this percentage has been estimated to climb to 61.76% by 1995. In addition to rapid population growth, some of the other problems plaguing the region in the early 1990s included illiteracy, absolute poverty, environmental pollution, and low status of women. Population education can play a key role in an intervention strategy for fertility decline. Schools should include population education because, if girls attend school, it can improve girls' chances for employment and affect future family sizes, and both male and female students are most apt to occupy important private sector and government positions and be leaders. UNESCO has proposed a 1992-1995 regional population education and communication program and hoped to gain UNFPA support for the program. UNESCO has heeded UNFPA's plea for more formidable and intensive backstopping to country programs. It proposed to create regional advisory teams that will provide technical assistance, organize study tours and workshops, facilitate intercountry sharing, and identify new areas of development. This team would also be population education advocates. It has also proposed a workshop in population communication for staff of rural oriented nongovernmental organizations and religious groups to close the UNFPA identified gap in information, education, and communication (IEC). Other similar proposed activities to close the IEC gap included workshops on audiovisual (AV) aids development and use and maintenance of AV equipment and on communication strategies to reach male family planning acceptors and intercountry research studies. UNESCO has also planned to place more emphasis on management, development of prototype population education materials, and other needed population education activities.
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  2. 2
    267879

    Meeting information needs for population education: using materials for population education, Booklet 1. Trial edition.

    UNESCO. Population Education Programme Service

    Bangkok, Thailand, Unesco, Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania, 1980. 95 p.

    This booklet is the outcome of month-long internship programs for population education documentation and materials service, organized in July and November 1978 by the Unesco Population Education Service with UNFPA assistance. The purpose was to enhance information activities in the field of population education, and to respond to the growing need for population education information in Asia and Oceania. Meant for persons whose work relates to population education, it deals with some basic techniques of using and processing population education materials. The focus of the booklet is on activities that usually lie within the domain of librarians, documentalists and information officers, which nevertheless are useful to others involved in this field; for example staff of population education programs are frequently required to respond to requests for information. The 3 learning modules contained here are: 1) Assessing the quality of population education materials; 2) Literature searches, bibliographies and request for materials; and 3) Writing abstracts for population education materials. Each module contains a set of objectives, pre-assessment questions, activities and post-test activities. This booklet has a sequel, Booklet 2, which deals with other areas of population education information.
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  3. 3
    041522

    Meeting information needs for population education: information services for population education, Booklet 2. Trial edition.

    UNESCO. Population Education Programme Service

    Bangkok, Thailand, Unesco, Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania, 1980. 96 p.

    This booklet is the outcome of month-long internship programs for population education documentation and materials services, organized in July and November 1978 by the Unesco Population Education programme Service with UNFPA assistance. The purpose was to enhance information activities in the field of population education, and to respond to the growing need for population education information in Asia and Oceania. Meant for persons whose work relates to population education, it focuses on the wide range of supplementary information activities that are provided to promote the success of the program. The supplementary activities include preparation of a newsletter and the distribution of background information to key leaders. The booklet contains 5 learning modules. The 1st module deals with the processing or transformation of materials, the 2nd examines more sophisticated materials services such as the selective dissemination of information and production of packages as well as basic survey technics, the 3rd examines methods of popularizing population education programs, the 4th analyses the nature and potential of networks as distribution and communication channels, and the 5th touches upon the evaluation of an information program and development of training workshops or materials for these programs. Each module contains a set of objectives, pre-assessment questions, activities and post-test activities. The preceding booklet, Booklet 1, covers other areas of population education.
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  4. 4
    013527

    Papua New Guinea strives to strengthen its traditional communication system: highlights of a 1980 Unesco report.

    Abrams T

    In: Unesco. Folk media and mass media in population communication. Paris, France, Unesco, [1977]. 17-9. (Population Communication: Technical Documentation No. 8)

    At the request of the government of Papua New Guinea and with the assistance of Unesco a report was prepared which examined the needs for strengthening the country's traditional communication systems. Highlights of this report are presented in this discussion, including notes on special conditions of the country, the study methodology, and selected findings. The government's request called attention to the heretofore "disproportionate concern with technology-oriented media" aimed at literate, urbanized audiences, while rural populations were virtually ignored." The Unesco report covers findings in only 5 of the country's provinces. These findings deal with the folk forms of expression at village level, and only those forms, or aspects of forms, considered by villagers as not being sacred or taboo for the purpose intended, were included in the survey. Story telling, looked at as a commmunication vehicle or channel, appeared to be an important form and a most persuasive form throughout the country. Singing was viewed as another important medium. Dance forms were used to express events or stories or states of feeling, and they were almost always accompanied by singing. The string band occupies a special place among youth almost everywhere in the country. The inventory of folk media in the villages covered in the Unesco report also makes reference to comical or satirical dramatic sketches and to mime. The government determined the schedule and location of village sites in 5 selected provinces--Central, Enga, East Sepik, Manus, and Northern. A questionnaire for the village visits was devised to create a qualified, if partial, inventory of useful small group forms of communication. The questionnaire was developed to provide in a 2 hour session in each village a result oriented profile of folk forms, at once embedded in the active cultural life of the people, but also considered by them as "open" or flexible enough to be used, with their own participation assured, in any government sponsored communication program. The outcome of the mission resulted in the preparation of an inventory with a profile of the characteristics of traditional forms of communication which might be used for development; preparation of a 2 year research project outline to provide information on folk media on a national scale and to develop an action program utilizing the most appropriate forms; and the identification of existing sources and documentation facilities relating to folk media in Papua New Guinea.
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  5. 5
    007249

    Solomon Islands: report of Mission on Needs Assessment for Population Assistance.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, UNFPA, 1981 Oct. 71 p. (Report No 43)

    A comprehensive assessment of basic needs for assistance to enable the Solomon Islands to achieve self-reliance in the population aspects of its national development is presented in this report. This report outlines the findings of the Mission that visited the Solomon Islands from November 28th to December 13th, 1979. The 9 sections of the report focus on the following: the national setting (geographical, governmental, and cultural features; demographic, social, and economic characteristics; socioeconomic development and national planning; and population objectives and development plans); basic population data; population policy formulation and dynamics; implementing population policies (health and family planning); education, information, and communication; and special programs and community development; external assistance (multilateral and bilateral assistance and nongovernmental organizations); and recommendations for population assistance. Solomon Islands, which achieved independence in 1978, has a population of 196,823 and a population growth rate of 3.4%. The draft of the 1980-1984 National Development Plan details sectoral goals that exceed the country's financial capacity, and construction delays and the limited availability of skilled local manpower severely inhibit the country's absorptive capacity for external assistance. The most pressing needs for population assistance are for projects that would have an impact on the socioeconomic factors that influence population variables--factors such as income-earning opportunities and capacities, women's status, education and training, and community development. The Mission recommends the development of a vital registration system and social statistics system. As there is no coherent national policy with regard to population size, growth, and distribution, it is recommended that a program be developed that would combine activities to raise the awareness of decision makers concerning the importance of population policy in development planning.
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  6. 6
    048849

    Evaluation of population education projects executed by the ILO in the Asia and Pacific region: general conclusions and recommendations.

    Matthews P; Roque F; Valdivia L; McWilliam J

    New York, New York, United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA], 1983 Dec. xiii, 27, [8] p.

    The United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) has provided funds over the past decade to the International Labor Organization (ILO) or to Governments to undertake population education activities directed at the organized sector. About 44% of this assistance has gone to UNFPA-funded regional and country projects in the Asia and Pacific Region. In order to assess these projects, a review of 21 projects took place and 8 projects in 3 countries (Bangladesh, India, Nepal) were visited by Evalutation Missions. The Missions found that the main immediate objective for all projects was to stimulate awareness and interest in family planning and to support population education. All projects but one were directed at industrial workers, and the provision of family planning was explicitly stated as an objective in 2 projects. All projects had a goal to institutionalise population education as a part of the agency/ministry implementing the projects. The Mission concluded that the greatest effect of these types of projects had been in the change of attitude and behavior of top and middle level management toward family planning for their workers, as illustrated by conduct of in-plant classes for population education on company time and provision of incentives for family planning acceptors. At the worker level, as a result of the extensive training activities, there is now a large cadre of trained worker motivators in many industrial establishments who can influence fellow workers and potentially other members of the community to accept family planning. However, no information was available, except for 2 projects evaluated, to assess the effects of the projects on contraceptive use. It was noted that some projects had focused mainly on groups already motivated towards family planning; more emphasis should be put on reaching audiences not yet motivated for family planning. The institutionalization of population education within the implementing agents of the projects is likely to be achieved in most of the projects evaluated, although this objective cannot be fully evaluated at this point in time. General conclusions and recommendations were made in 4 areas: planning of projects, approach to reach the organized sector, implementation of projects and administration of projects.
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