Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 2 Results

  1. 1
    201535

    Report. European Parliamentarians' Forum on Child Survival, Women and Population: Integrated Strategies, February 12-13, 1986, the Hague, Netherlands.

    European Parliamentarians' Forum on Child Survival, Women and Population

    [The Hague, Netherlands, European Parliamentarians' Forum on Child Survival, Women and Population, 1986.] 109 p.

    This report summarizes the consensus of the European Parliamentarians' Forum on Child Survival, Women, and Population. They have had the opportunity to examine integrated approaches to several of the world's most crucial issues of social development. Their co-sponsors, the World Health Organization, UNICEF, and the UN Population FUND, have been active in promoting integrated strategies to provide health for all, survival and well-being of mothers and children, family planning, and full and equal participation of men and women in the development process. But a great deal more remains to be done. The parliamentarians subscribe to the view that the effectiveness of the UN system will increase considerably in pursuit of commonly defined goals and objectives and action programs as defined in various conferences and meetings. Common action plans are available; the challenge now is to engage in a combined and concerted effort to implement these plans. Their role as parliamentarians is to implement the recommendations of today and to build up support, both within the governmental and the private sectors. Public perception tends to overlook the significant contributions the UN and related bodies are making to improve conditions of life and well-being the world over. The main tasks all have agreed on are 1) encouraging UN agencies and organizations concerned with social development to work together closely and to and enhance the effectiveness of their programs; 2) focusing public attention on the interrelatedness of issues relating to health, mother and child survival and care, the role and status of women, and freedom of choice for both men and women in family matters; 3) seeking greater support for social development programs of the UN, which ultimately strengthens the UN as a whole, through increased governmental contributions and better public understanding; and 4) maintaining and strengthening their own commitment through dialogues among themselves as parliamentarians.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    203698

    Child survival, women and population.

    Axelbank J

    [New York, United Nations, 1986.] 27 p.

    The ongoing crisis confronting women and children in the Third World--where disease and hunger are taking millions of lives of young children every year and where population growth still proceeds at an unacceptably high rate--is actually worsening in some areas. The European Parliamentarians' Forum on Child Survival, Women, and Population: Integrated Strategies was held under the auspices of The Netherlands government and organized in cooperation with 3 UN organizations: the World Health Organization, UNICEF, and the UN Fund for Population Activities. It is critical that the world regain the momentum of past decades in reducing appalling child mortality rates, improving the health and status of women, and slowing population growth. Development programs from health education to agriculture are hampered or crippled by the inability of development planners to recognize the centrality of the woman's role. Maternal and child health is the logical entry point for primary health care. Education is the springboard for rescuing women in the Third World from poverty, illness,endless childbearing, and lowly social status. One should educate women to save children. Women in the developing world must be given access to basic information to be able to take advantage of new, improved or rediscovered technologies such as 1) oral rehydration therapy, 2) vaccines, 3) growth monitoring through frequent charting to detect early signs of malnutrition, 4) breast feeding, and 5) birth spacing. Education is the single most documented factor affecting birth rate, status of women, and infant and child health. The presentations at The Hague threw into sharp relief the close links, the cause and effect chains, and the synergisms associated with all the factors connected, directly or indirectly, with child survival, women's status, and population--factors such as education, economic opportunities, and overall development questions. A 4-point agenda includes 1) encouraging UN agencies and organizations concerned with social development to work closely together and to enhance the effectiveness of their programs, 2) seeking greater support for the UN's social development programs, 3) focusing public attention on the interrelatedness of health, maternal and child survival and care, women's status, and freedom of choice in family matters, and 4) maintaining and strengthening commitment through the dialogue of parliamentarians.
    Add to my documents.