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Your search found 7 Results

  1. 1
    291907

    HIV Prevention Now Programme Briefs. Overview.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2001 Aug. [6] p. (HIV Prevention Now Programme Briefs No.1)

    The purpose of this Programme Brief series is to provide staff, particularly field staff, with concise and useful information in supporting countries in their response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. HIV Prevention Now Programme Brief No.1 - Overview, is intended to summarize the importance of prevention in combating the HIV/AIDS pandemic and baseline strategies for UNFPA programme response at the country level. Upcoming briefs will focus on substantive areas including prevention of HIV infection in mothers and its transmission to their children, young people, condom programming, gender, emergency situations, population policy, and population based data. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    281287

    CAH progress report, 2000.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development, 2001. [59] p. (WHO/FCH/CAH/01.12)

    CAH has continued to strengthen catalytic linkages with other WHO departments, UN agencies, bilateral agencies, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), private voluntary organizations and foundations. These partners play an important role in assessing the need for strategies for child and adolescent health and development and in supporting their implementation. Strong collaboration exists with a range of partners inside and outside WHO. It is through these partnerships that CAH is able to build capacity and extend the application of Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) and adolescent health and development interventions. This progress report provides an informative summary of the work of the Department midway through the current biennium. Chapter 1 describes the Department’s global priorities in child and adolescent health, and efforts to address them. Chapters 2–4 summarize the year’s work in three topic areas—promoting a safe and supportive environment, improving health service delivery, and monitoring and evaluation. The final chapter describes collaboration with partners and continuing efforts to expand capacity for sound public health programming at all levels. A full programme report will be prepared at the close of the 2000–2001 biennium. The CAH staff in Headquarters, in the Regional Offices and in countries invite you to read this report, make suggestions, and join us in our efforts to mobilize the global community in promoting the health of children and adolescents. In addition, we would like to take this opportunity to thank those who have provided support to our activities, both technical and financial. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    278314

    The Planned Parenthood Association of Thailand: prevention of domestic violence against women and children in Thailand through the promotion of reproductive health.

    Pekanan N; Wongsurawat K

    Innovations: Innovative Approaches to Population Programme Management. 2001; 9:73-100.

    Thailand is the third largest country among the Southeast Asian nations with an area of approximately 513,000 square kilometres. It has a total population of about 62 million with 95 percent of the population embracing Buddhism. Known for having a soft-spoken society rich in culture and high in spirituality, the general assumption is that domestic violence is rare. Yet such a state of security does not exist regardless of the culture that one belongs to. On many occasions domestic violence not only involves women, but children usually suffer the consequences as well. It is not unusual that such acts of violence are considered a family affair and thus many cases go unreported or unpublicised, perhaps out of the victims’ fear or simply from ignorance of their rights. The Thai government has come a long way in countering the prevalence of domestic violence through on-going efforts to amend its legal system and constitution. Demonstrating commitment to protect women and children from discrimination and violence, it has acknowledged various international treaties and even incorporated the rights and welfare of women and children in its National Plan framework. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    273758

    Strategic guidance on HIV prevention.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2001. 32 p. (Preventing HIV / Promoting Reproductive Health)

    UNFPA has worked in the field of population and development for more than three decades and has addressed the issue of HIV/AIDS for the last decade. However, no organization by itself has the capacity or the resources needed to address and halt the pandemic. An effective response requires careful collaboration and coordination among organizations, with each bringing to the partnership a distinct set of capabilities, strengths and comparative advantages. As one of the eight cosponsors of UNAIDS (the other cosponsors being UNICEF, UNDP, UNDCP, UNESCO, ILO, WHO and World Bank), UNFPA chairs Theme Groups in many countries and supports HIV-prevention interventions in almost all of its country programmes. To maximize its response and to strengthen coordinated activities with other partners, it is critical for staff at every level to have a common understanding of the Fund’s policies and strategic priorities. The aim of this document is to provide such guidance to staff, delineating the niche in which UNFPA as an organization has a definite comparative advantage in addressing the HIV/AIDS epidemic, especially at the country level. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    273392

    What do we know about capacity building? An overview of existing knowledge and good practice.

    Milèn A

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2001 Jun. 29 p.

    The World Health Organization as an intergovernmental specialised agency has the task and challenge to support its member governments in strengthening their capacity to steer their health systems. This figures prominently in the recent World Health Report, in which stewardship is ranked as the most important of the health system functions. In the Report, stewardship is defined as a “function of a government responsible for the welfare of the population, and concerned about the trust and legitimacy with which its activities are viewed by the citizenry”. This overview on capacity building covers the recent thinking on the issue and provides information relevant to strengthening capacities also in the stewardship role of the governments. This paper is written primarily to the participants of a WHO project which aims to develop, in partnership with countries, ways to support senior policy makers and managers of health systems. Major developments have taken place in capacity building during the 1990s. Most information on the topic is recent and appears in grey literature. This overview aims to present the current knowledge on the concepts and practice in capacity building. The first part of the document discusses some major changes in the international thinking. The second part links the concepts and frameworks to the state of the art in practising capacity building. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    168424

    2001 annual report. [Informe anual 2001]

    Management Sciences for Health [MSH]

    Boston, Massachusetts, MSH, 2001. 26 p.

    This 2001 annual report summarizes the efforts of Management Sciences for Health (MSH) at the global, national, and local levels to fight HIV/AIDS and other preventable diseases. It is noted that MSH seeks to increase the effectiveness and sustainability of health services by improving management systems, promoting access to services, and influencing public policy. Its activities focus on educating those concerned in health care; applying practical management skills to public health problems in the public and private sectors; strengthening capabilities through collaborative work and training programs; and applying and replicating innovations in health management. Case studies from Malawi and Brazil are included.
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  7. 7
    166839

    NGO development in the Central Asian Republics.

    Shamsutdinova A; Kukubassova Z; Alimbaeva G

    Choices. 2001 Autumn; 9-11.

    The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) Field Office was opened in Almaty, Kazakhstan in 1996 to assist nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) that are new or pending members of the IPPF European Network. This document summarizes the advocacy, capacity-building and media work of that office.
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