Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 2 Results

  1. 1
    136682

    UNFPA fifth country programme of assistance to the government of Kenya, 1997 to 2001. Framework for the reproductive health sub-programme.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]. Kenya Field Office

    [Unpublished] 1997 Dec. xiii, 32 p.

    This project between the UN Population Fund and Kenya's Ministry of Health proposes to strengthen technical and institutional capacity at all levels in the effective provision of reproductive health (RH) services during 1997-2001. The aims are to increase quality and accessibility of RH by a specific percentage, to reduce maternal mortality by 20%, to reduce perinatal morbidity and mortality by 30%, and to increase contraceptive prevalence by 20% in selected districts and Nairobi slums. The aims are also to provide youth-appropriate RH services, to reduce the spread of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV/AIDS, and to intensify IEC activities in support of RH services and other activities. This proposal describes the background, justification, and health reforms in Kenya; the RH achievements and lessons learned; selected issues to be addressed in the national RH program; goals; strategies and activities; monitoring and evaluation; the institutional framework; related activities and funding sources; and the summary budget. The budget will be shared between the Government (60%) and implementing nongovernmental organizations (40%). About 10% will be directed to IEC. The total summary budget is US$13 million. The main strategy for preventing STIs and HIV/AIDS is to integrate the education within day-to-day activities of health staff and to train service providers (SPs) at all levels. Surgical gloves and male-friendly services will be provided to all SP points. Technical support will be provided by advisers in Addis Ababa, selected national consultants, and field office program staff.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    138724

    NGO involvement in World Bank-financed social funds: lessons learned.

    Malena C

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, Environment Department, Social Policy and Resettlement Division, 1997 May. [5], 83 p. (Environment Department Papers Participation Series No. 052)

    This report reviews lessons learned by the World Bank (WB) about the involvement of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in WB-financed "social funds." Since 1986, the WB has channeled more than $1.3 billion to more than 30 social funds in Latin America, Africa, Asia, and Eastern Europe to 1) mitigate the social costs of structural adjustment programs or respond to emergencies, 2) improve living conditions for impoverished people, and/or 3) promote decentralization of service delivery by building local capacity. Social funds may finance small-scale activities in the health, education, water, and sanitation sectors and/or meet basic needs, create social programs, set-up micro/credit programs to develop small enterprises, or develop infrastructure. After providing a general introduction, the report outlines the various roles that NGOs can have in implementation of social funds, the benefits and risks of such involvement, and the current extent of NGO involvement. The third section identifies the key issues and lessons learned, and section 4 reviews the principal criticisms and concerns of NGOs. Section 5 offers recommendations for improving NGO involvement in WB-financed social funds. Specific examples and case studies are highlighted throughout the report, and annexes summarize NGO involvement in selected social funds and provide a sample checklist, manual, gender action plan, implementation agreement, financing agreement, bidding document, and works contract.
    Add to my documents.