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Your search found 23 Results

  1. 1
    374611

    ‘Leaving no one behind’ in action: observations from FGE’sseven-year experience working with civil society.

    United Nations. UN Women. Fund for Gender Equality [FGE]

    New York, New York, UN Women, [2017]. 8 p.

    This brief contains observations from the Fund for Gender Equality’s (FGE) seven-year experience working with civil society. Gender equality is at the forefront of the 2030 Development Agenda. The Sustainable Development Goals include a stand-alone goal to advance equality, and gender-related targets mainstreamed across the Global Goals. If something has opened a door for drastic progress in the lives of women and girls worldwide, it is the principle of leaving no one behind. Leaving no one behind means prioritizing human beings’ dignity and placing the progress of the most marginalized communities first—women and girls being all too often at the top of the list. It urges us to address the structural causes of inequality and marginalization that affect them. This ambitious undertaking requires a collective effort to identify and share effective strategies to operationalize this concept. This brief offers practical insights based on the experience of the FGE in working with marginalized populations through its support to women-led civil society organizations (CSOs).
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  2. 2
    340901

    Sustainable development indicators: The last missing piece of the 2030 agenda.

    Worley H

    Washington, D.C., Population Reference Bureau [PRB], 2016 Mar. [6] p.

    The "last missing piece" to complete the architecture of the 2030 sustainable development agenda is to adopt a comprehensive framework of progress indicators to guide countries’ efforts to reach the Goals by 2030. This article explains the challenges of collecting the indicator data.
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  3. 3
    383099
    Peer Reviewed

    A decade of investments in monitoring the HIV epidemic: how far have we come? A descriptive analysis.

    Alfven T; McDougal L; Frescura L; Aran C; Amler P; Gill W

    Health Research Policy and Systems. 2014; 12:62.

    BACKGROUND: The 2001 Declaration of Commitment (DoC) adopted by the General Assembly Special Session on HIV/AIDS (UNGASS) included a call to monitor national responses to the HIV epidemic. Since the DoC, efforts and investments have been made globally to strengthen countries' HIV monitoring and evaluation (M&E) capacity. This analysis aims to quantify HIV M&E investments, commitments, capacity, and performance during the last decade in order to assess the success and challenges of national and global HIV M&E systems. METHODS: M&E spending and performance was assessed using data from UNGASS country progress reports. The National Composite Policy Index (NCPI) was used to measure government commitment, government engagement, partner/civil society engagement, and data generation, as well as to generate a composite HIV M&E System Capacity Index (MESCI) score. Analyses were restricted to low and middle income countries (LMICs) who submitted NCPI reports in 2006, 2008, and 2010 (n = 78). RESULTS: Government commitment to HIV M&E increased considerably between 2006 and 2008 but decreased between 2008 and 2010. The percentage of total AIDS spending allocated to HIV M&E increased from 1.1% to 1.4%, between 2007 and 2010, in high-burden LMICs. Partner/civil society engagement and data generation capacity improved between 2006 and 2010 in the high-burden countries. The HIV MESCI increased from 2006 to 2008 in high-burden countries (78% to 94%), as well as in other LMICs (70% to 77%), and remained relatively stable in 2010 (91% in high-burden countries, 79% in other LMICs). Among high-burden countries, M&E system performance increased from 52% in 2006 to 89% in 2010. CONCLUSIONS: The last decade has seen increased commitments and spending on HIV M&E, as well as improved M&E capacity and more available data on the HIV epidemic in both high-burden and other LMICs. However, challenges remain in the global M&E of the AIDS epidemic as we approach the 2015 Millennium Development Goal targets.
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  4. 4
    329086

    Scaling up prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

    Attawell K

    Teddington, United Kingdom, Tearfund, 2008 Jul. 44 p.

    This report provides an overview of PMTCT and is an attempt to explore what is working, and why, in scaling up access. The report captures innovative examples of successful programming and partnerships, while identifying challenges and bottlenecks that must be overcome if these countries are to meet their nationally set universal access targets by 2010. The research methodology used for this report was based on a desk review, interviews with key global informants (see Acknowledgements) and country case studies in Malawi, Nigeria and Zambia in early 2008. The in-country study included semi-structured interviews with representatives of government and nongovernmental organisations as well as focus group discussions with community representatives, participatory and observational methodologies. The main objectives of the research were to: 1) identify and conduct interviews with the key international and national stakeholders and explore the structure, components, implementation, co-ordination, financing, policies, and guidelines and monitoring system of the PMTCT programmes; 2) determine what was working well and why; and 3) identify specific bottlenecks, challenges and recommendations for progress. This report provides an overview of the perceptions of key experts and communities on PMTCT interventions and approaches, current global action and country progress.
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  5. 5
    323312

    Bringing water to Africa's poor: Expanded access requires more funds, efficiency and capacity.

    Dovi E

    Africa Renewal. 2007 Oct; 21(3):7.

    Until six years ago, Eugenia Uwamahoro and several of her eight children had to trek 2 kilometres each day to a river to get about 140 litres of water for drinking, cooking, washing and feeding her four cows. There was a water pump in her village, Nyakabingo, in Rwanda's Gicumbi district, but it hardly functioned. Then the Rwandan government, with financial support from the UN Children's Fund (UNICEF), repaired the pump, and the community contracted a private manager to maintain it. "It has improved my life," Ms. Uwamahoro told African Renewal. "Now we can rest." Not only has the pump saved her considerable time and effort, but she also gets her household's daily water supply at lower cost than she would have from the private village water carriers who cart it up from the river. Many villagers "are happy to pay for the improved service," says Kamaru Tstoneste, who operates the pump. But some villagers cannot afford the cost. So community leaders compiled a list of the neediest households, and review it from time to time. "This group gets an agreed quantity of free supply," Mr. Tstoneste told Africa Renewal. Still, he adds, "Old habits die hard. There are those who refuse to pay for water and still go to the river." (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    316772

    Gender approaches in conflict and post-conflict situations.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]. Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery

    New York, New York, UNDP, Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery, 2002 Oct. 28 p.

    This manual was compiled during a seminar entitled "Approccio di genere in situazioni di emergenza, conflitto e post-conflitto" (Gender approach in emergency, conflict, and postconflict situations), which was held in Rome on 2-6 April 2001. The seminar was organized by the UNDP Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery in Rome and the Emergency division of the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and included participants from various Italian non governmental organizations (NGOs) and UN agencies directly involved in emergency, crisis response and recovery operations. During the seminar, a needs assessment session was held and participants expressed their interest in having a "how to" manual that could help them better integrate a gender approach during humanitarian, recovery and development activities. The first chapter contains information on the approaches to women and gender issues over the last 20 years. It provides the basic concepts necessary to understand how to address gender issues and improve the impact of humanitarian assistance. In the second chapter, the relevant international instruments protecting the rights of people affected by war and other emergency situations are presented. Relevant passages are quoted and explained. The full text of these instruments can be found in the annexed CD-ROM. The third chapter contains information that can be used as reference in programming and organizing humanitarian interventions with a gender perspective. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    313124

    Toolkit to combat trafficking in persons.

    United Nations. Office on Drugs and Crime. Anti-Human-Trafficking Unit

    Vienna, Austria, United Nations, Office on Drugs and Crime, 2006. [245] p.

    The present Toolkit was prepared because there is still much to be learned about what works best to prevent and combat human trafficking under various circumstances. It presents a selection of conceptual, legislative and organizational tools in use in different parts of the world. The Toolkit is based on the premise that the problem of trafficking in persons, whether at the national or local level, can only be addressed effectively on the basis of comprehensive strategies that are based on human rights and that take into account the transnational nature of the problem, the many associated criminal activities, the frequent involvement of organized criminal groups and the profound pain, fear and damage suffered by the victims. Although the Toolkit offers a few examples of comprehensive national strategies, most of the tools that it offers focus on one specific aspect of the comprehensive response required. Individual tools may be used to develop comprehensive strategies, or to augment or strengthen some of the essential components of existing ones. Many of these tools will need to be adapted to national or local circumstances. None of the tools, by itself, is sufficient to provide an effective response to the problem. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    305296

    UNU / IUNS nutrition capacity building efforts in Africa.

    Pepping F

    SCN News. 2006; (33):39-42.

    The 1996 Manila meeting and subsequent meeting in Cape Town in 1999 stimulated capacity development activities within UNU and IUNS. IN 2000, several African regional capacity task forces held initial planning meetings to develop an overall action plan. The plan was accepted during the SCN meeting in April 2001 in Nairobi. Most of the activities outlined in the action plan were implemented in 2002. This paper reviews progress of these activities, directly or indirectly through the work of Food & Nutrition Programme of the United Nations University (UNU-FNP). (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    311697

    Campaigning with partners for the MDGs: a case study of Brazil.

    Dimitrova D; de Oliveira MC

    New York, New York, United Nations Development Programme [UNDP], [2005]. 14 p.

    The deepening of democratic institutions, gains in macroeconomic stability and rapid expansion of prosperity contribute to an overall encouraging context for sustainable development in Brazil. Yet, despite these numerous advances, real poverty has only moderately declined, and inequality persists. In Brazil, economic and social status tends to vary by geography, race and gender, a legacy of the country's history. Imposed and de facto colonial and post-colonial divisions among indigenous peoples and descendents of Portuguese settlers, African slaves and European, Middle Eastern and Asian immigrants created persistent structures of exclusion and inequality. In the 1950s, during the military government, a strategy of import substitution prioritized rapid industrial expansion, and helped to bring about significant, sustained economic growth. Benefits, however, accrued disproportionately to the upper classes at the expense of workers and unions. The industrialization contributed to the expansion of the favelas (urban slums), one of Brazil's greatest contemporary challenges, by promoting urban migration while infrastructure and social support did not expand at the same pace. (excerpt)
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  10. 10
    303747

    UNDP response to HIV / AIDS.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]. Bureau for Development Policy. HIV / AIDS Group; United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]. Communications Office

    New York, New York, UNDP, 2004 Jul. [2] p.

    The HIV/AIDS epidemic is one of the world's most serious development crises. An estimated 3 million people died of AIDS in 2003 and 5 million acquired HIV -- bringing the number of people living with the virus around the world to 38 million. Without decisive action, not only will we fail to achieve the goal of reversing the spread of HIV/AIDS, but worse: the number of people infected is likely to double in less than a decade. International funding to respond to the epidemic has increased, but it will take comprehensive and sustained intervention in both high and low prevalence countries to turn the tide. (excerpt)
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  11. 11
    300918

    Corporate strategy on HIV / AIDS.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]. Bureau for Development Policy. HIV / AIDS Group

    New York, New York, UNDP, Bureau for Development Policy, HIV / AIDS Group, [2004]. 8 p.

    Twenty years on, the HIV/AIDS epidemic continues to spread without respite. Almost 40 million people are living with HIV and AIDS, half of them women. The impact of HIV/AIDS is unique because it kills adults in the most productive period of their lives, depriving families, communities, and nations of their most productive people. Adding to an already heavy disease burden in poor countries, the epidemic is deepening poverty, reversing human development, worsening gender inequalities, eroding the capacity of governments to provide essential services, reducing labour productivity, and hampering pro-poor growth. The epidemic is quickly becoming the biggest obstacle to achieving the Millennium Development Goals. (excerpt)
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  12. 12
    300911

    Ukraine human development report. Special edition 2003. Ukraine and HIV / AIDS: time to act.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]

    Kyiv, Ukraine, UNDP, 2003. 36 p.

    Ukraine is a young nation on the move. The national response to HIV/AIDS is also gathering pace. It is bringing together fresh coalitions of people, leaders and institutions who want to stop the further spread of this virus and to ensure care for those who are in need. The good news for all is that there are now known ways of preventing the spread of the virus and treatment is increasingly available. The challenge remains immense -- to some overwhelming. The insidious nature of the virus is that it attacks men and women in the prime of their life -- between the ages of 15 and 40. It robs children of their parents, and society of its productive citizens. Limited budgets and ungrounded stigma have severely hampered a scaled-up nationwide response. Positive rhetoric is helpful, but it needs to be matched by personal commitment and concrete actions. With the infusion of new resources, now is the time to remove the log jams and unleash a broad-based national effort to change the current course of the epidemic. As the Secretary General of the United Nations Kofi Annan recently said, "We have come a long way, but not far enough. Clearly, we will have to work harder to ensure that our commitment is matched by the necessary resources and action." (excerpt)
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  13. 13
    300179

    Hope. Building capacity. Least developed countries meet the HIV / AIDS challenge.

    United Nations. Office of the High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and the Small Island Developing States [UN-OHRLLS]; United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]

    New York, New York, UN-OHRLLS, [2005]. [28] p.

    Roughly a quarter of the world’s countries are classified as Least Developed Countries (LDCs), who remain the most vulnerable and weakest segment of the international community, of these 34 are in Africa, 15 in Asia-Pacific and one in the Caribbean. It is now clear that without achieving a huge acceleration in their development efforts, few global development targets can be met. The AIDS pandemic is worsening the prospects of LDCs as many of the hardest hit countries are facing massive financial and human resource constraints. These countries by definition have limited resources to generate sufficient economic and social development, and as such are at greater risk. HIV/AIDS is eroding these limited resources and affecting the most productive people so urgently needed for development. In other words, HIV/AIDS affects the present and future human and institutional capacities of countries and consequently their capacity to generate economic and social development. (excerpt)
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  14. 14
    297496

    EFA flagship initiatives. Multi-partner collaborative mechanisms in support of EFA goals.

    Mputu H; Lawale S

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2004. 55 p. (ED-2004/WS/16)

    The World Education Forum held in Dakar (April, 2000) reemphasized and reiterated the importance of inter-agency partnerships, collaboration and coordination in pursuance of the EFA goals. This facilitated the launching of a number of multi-partner initiatives that focused on specific EFA-related areas and problems requiring special attention as well as the reinforcing of existing ones. EFA flagship initiatives were considered to constitute, among others, one of the mechanisms that would contribute in enhancing and strengthening multi-agency partnership and coherence on EFA related goals. Three years after Dakar, the EFA flagships continue to expand in terms of number of initiatives launched as well as their scope and membership. At present, nine initiatives have been established, involving United Nations organizations, bilateral and multilateral agencies and NGOs. (excerpt)
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  15. 15
    296474

    Enhancing support of African development - includes a definition of the African Initiative - Special Initiative on Africa - Cover story.

    UN Chronicle. 1996 Summer; 33(2):[7] p..

    The Special Initiative on Africa, launched globally on 15 March by the Secretary-General along with the executive heads of all UN agencies and organizations represented in the Administrative Committee on Coordination (ACC), aims to give practical expression to the policy commitments made in the past, such as the UN New Agenda for the Development of Africa in the 1990s. Unprecedented in scope, the Initiative reflects the priority accorded to Africa's development by the international community, the mandates emanating from the General Assembly, the Economic and Social Council and major UN conferences, as well as the undertakings made individually and collectively by African Governments to accelerate the development of their countries. (excerpt)
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  16. 16
    295848

    Advocacy and Resource Mobilization for the 2010 Round of Censuses, New York, 24-25 February 2005.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]; United Nations. Statistics Division

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2005. [221] p.

    The United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) in collaboration with the United Nations Statistics Division (UNSD), organized an international meeting on "Advocacy and Resource Mobilization towards the Successful Implementation of the 2010 Round (2005-2014) of Population and Housing Censuses in Developing Countries" in New York on 24 and 25 February 2005. The meeting was attended by 64 participants from various United Nations agencies and affiliates, national statistics/census offices, bilateral donors, non-governmental organizations, and academic and technical organizations. The meeting also included representatives from developing country governmental policy-making and funding organizations. The meeting focused on: 1) a review of the problem areas experienced in the 2000 Round of Censuses, including the serious under-utilization and poor dissemination of census results at the national and sub-national levels; 2) a description of the 2010 World Programme on Population and Housing Censuses; 3) a discussion of proposed strategies for the successful implementation of the 2010 Round of Censuses; and 4) the development of an advocacy and resource mobilization plan for the 2010 Round, which identifies the resources needed to ensure successful implementation of the 2010 Round and emphasizes the value of censuses in measuring progress towards the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). (excerpt)
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  17. 17
    293244

    Towards achieving millennium development goals in the health sector in India [editorial]

    Agarwal SP

    Journal, Indian Academy of Clinical Medicine. 2005 Oct-Dec; 6(4):268-274.

    At the Millennium Summit held at the United Nations (New York) in September 2000, 189 countries reaffirmed their commitment to working towards a world in which sustaining development and eliminating poverty would have the highest priority. Eight Millennium Development Goals (MDG) were adopted by a consensus of experts to measure progress in all the major areas related to the well-being of people. These included extreme poverty, education, health, gender equality, and the environment. All goals are interlinked, and efforts to achieve one goal will have positive spillover effects on several others. 18 Targets and 48 Indicators have been adopted to monitor the Eight Millennium Development Goals. Of these, 8 Targets and 18 Indicators are directly related to health. While many health indicators are "truly health indicators" such as prevalence and death rates associated with malaria and tuberculosis, some are related to critical factors for health such as access to improved water supply or dietary energy consumption (health-related indicators). India is committed to achieve the Targets under the MDGs by 2015. Incidentally, certain targets have been set under the National Population Policy 2000 (NPP-2000), National Health Policy 2002 (NHP-2002), National AIDS Prevention and Control Policy 2004, and the Tenth Five Year Plan. This paper compares goals and targets mentioned in these documents vis-a-vis selected Millennium Development Goals and Targets. This also highlights the current progress towards attaining the MDGs as well as the challenges ahead. (excerpt)
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  18. 18
    292333

    Local authorities backing the MDGs.

    Gateau E

    Habitat Debate. 2005 Sep; 11(3):7.

    The five-year Millennium review summit in September 2005 to speed up efforts aimed at achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in the fight against world poverty has the support of cities and their associations around the world, including United Cities and Local Governments (UCLG). While the MDGs and targets have been formulated at the global level, there is a need to bring them back home to our cities and demonstrate clearly how they can be applied at street level. With this objective in mind, the UCLG World Council met in Beijing during June 2005 to approve the UCLG Millennium Cities and Towns Campaign and the Local Governments Millennium Declaration. This campaign aims to reach thousands of cities around the globe and the declaration is testimony to our members’ collective commitment to the MDGs. Hand-in-hand with the United Nations, we are spearheading a worldwide movement towards localising the goals and targets in our cities and towns. UNHABITAT and UCLG have signed an agreement of cooperation, of which the localizing MDGs is a core component. (excerpt)
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  19. 19
    187346

    Population ageing and development: social, health and gender issues. Report of an Expert Group Meeting, Population Ageing and Development: Social, Health and Gender Issues with a Focus on the Poor in Old Age, 29-31 October 2001, Valletta, Malta. [Envejecimiento de la población y desarrollo: aspectos sociales, de salud y de género. Informe de la reunión del Grupo de Expertos sobre Envejecimiento y Desarrollo: aspectos sociales, de salud y de género centrado en los pobres en la vejez, 29-31 de octubre de 2001, Valletta, Malta]

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]; Population and Family Study Center

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2002 Apr. x, 93 p. (Population and Development Strategies Series No. 3)

    Professor Fenech welcomed participants of the Expert Group Meeting on Population Ageing and Development, convened in Malta by the United Nations Population Fund in collaboration with the UN Programme on Ageing, HelpAge International and the AARR He stated that INIA was proud to host the event. "This three-day international expert group meeting is particularly timely and important, for during these three days, we will explore the approaches and programmes that are meaningful and necessary to address the needs of the older poor and frail, especially those living in developing countries. It is hoped that at the end of the meeting there will be a set of recommendations which could be presented at the Second World Assembly on Ageing in Madrid in April next year. I am confident that we are going to have a most productive and fruitful meeting". (excerpt)
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  20. 20
    183614

    Capacity building in reproductive health programmes focusing on male involvement: a South-to-South framework.

    Duza MB

    In: Programming for male involvement in reproductive health. Report of the meeting of WHO Regional Advisers in Reproductive Health, WHO / PAHO, Washington DC, USA, 5-7 September 2001. Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2002. 115-129. (WHO/FCH/RHR/02.3)

    The issue of male involvement in reproductive health is enigmatic. It has traditionally been held that men's role and voice are decisive in the family building process and reproductive health outcomes of both males and females. At the same time, against the backdrop of recent and ongoing experience, men also have been characterized as the neglected half in the pertinent programmes, playing a tangential role relative to women. Within this general area, the present paper explores the opportunities for capacity building in reproductive health programmes, keeping in view some critical areas where male involvement appears to be especially relevant. The exercise is undertaken in light of lessons learned in the South-to- South framework of inter-country sharing and exchange of experience in the field. Possible institutional strengthening towards increased and effective male involvement is considered in order to address capacity-building needs at the level of policy makers, programme managers, service providers and clients. (author's)
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  21. 21
    184748

    Results: HIV / AIDS.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]

    New York, New York, UNDP, 2002. 17 p.

    This document gives an overview of the United Nations Development Programme’s current activities in the area of HIV/AIDS. It focuses on results achieved in supporting countries in their efforts to effectively respond to the complex challenge of reversing the spread of the epidemic. (author's)
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  22. 22
    175636

    Monitoring development progress: data collection needs and challenges. Background paper for the Fifth Asian and Pacific Population Conference, Senior Officials Segment, 11-14 December 2002, Bangkok.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]. Technical Support Division. Population and Development Study Branch

    Bangkok, Thailand, ESCAP, 2002 Nov 26. 9 p. (PRUDD/SAPPC/INF.9)

    Population-based data and indicators are crucial for national and sub-national policies and plans, for development frameworks, such as the United Nations' Common Country Assessment (CCAs) and the Poverty Reduction Strategies Papers (PRSPs), for national and global tracking of progress towards the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) derived from the global United Nations conferences and summits of the 1990s, for results based management, as well as for evidence based policy dialogue. The increased demand for indicators to measure development progress, has heightened national and international awareness of the need to build sustainable statistical capacity for the collection of timely and relevant statistics for policy formulation and programme management. The ability to provide timely indicators to measure development progress requires several data collection sources and instruments, as well as a well-resourced national statistical system. This paper reviews the data needs for monitoring development progress. (excerpt)
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  23. 23
    141686

    A manual and resource book for popular participation training. Volume four. Techniques.

    United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs

    New York, New York, United Nations, 1978. v, 72 p. (ST/ESA/66 (Vol. IV))

    This manual (volume 4) produced by the UN presents a number of practical training techniques that can be incorporated into the popular participation training to achieve specific objectives and to create a more varied and interesting experience. It also contains 5 elements essential in the evaluation of each technique, which includes objectives, settings, process, discussion and comments or preparation. Chapter 1 discusses the techniques for problem recognition, which include: 1) first steps in group activities; 2) perception exercises; 3) entering your own space and entering another's space; 4) force field analysis; 5) polling; 6) differences in perception; and 7) serialized posters. Chapter 2 describes the techniques for capacity building, which consist of: 1) village planner; 2) problem-solving posters; 3) the impertinent PERT chart; 4) need identification; 5) choosing a color; 6) inter-group competition in plan preparation; 7) inter-group collaboration in program implementation and 8) challenging conflicts within the Iwo village. Chapter 3 presents the techniques for attitude and value development through role playing, development of community, awareness of hidden motives, the fishbowl approach, difference between clear and unclear goals, charting group participation, application of empathy and ring-toss.
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