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  1. 1
    372761

    Evaluation of the UNFPA support to family planning 2008-2013. Volume 1.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, Evaluation Office, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2016 Apr. 105 p.

    The purpose of the evaluation was to assess the performance of UNFPA in the field of family planning during the period covered by the Strategic Plan 2008-2013 and to provide learning to inform the implementation of the current UNFPA Family Planning Strategy Choices not chance (2012-2020). The evaluation provided an overall independent assessment of UNFPA interventions in the area of family planning and identified key lessons learned for the current and future strategies. The particular emphasis of this evaluation was on learning with a view to informing the implementation of the UNFPA family planning strategy Choices not chance 2012-2020, as well as other related interventions and programmes, such as the Global Programme to Enhance Reproductive Health Commodity Security (GPRHCS- 2013-2020). The evaluation constituted an important contribution to the mid-term review of UNFPA strategic plan 2014-2017. The evaluation features five country case study reports: Bolivia, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Ethiopia, and Zimbabwe.
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  2. 2
    332015

    The Fistula Fortnight: Healing Wounds, Renewing Hope, 21 February - 6 March 2005, Kano, Katsina, Kebbi and Sokoto States, Nigeria.

    Iliyasu Z; Idoko L; Ramsey K

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], [2007]. 46 p.

    The Fistula Fortnight accomplished a number of goals: it mobilized resources for obstetric fistula and safe motherhood; increased public awareness that fistula is preventable; contributed to combating the marginalization of women who suffer from fistula; strengthened institutional capacity to manage fistula; and began to address the broader needs of women living with the disability. While the surgeries conducted represent only a small portion of the backlog, the Fistula Fortnight provided a strategic opportunity to raise awareness and motivate action among policymakers, national and local leaders, and the general public about the need to increase efforts to both prevent and treat fistula. (Excerpt)
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  3. 3
    321122

    Engaging faith-based organizations in HIV prevention. A training manual for programme managers.

    Toure A; Melek M; Jato M; Kane M; Kajungu R

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2007. [53] p.

    The influence behind faith-based organizations is not difficult to discern. In many developing countries, FBOs not only provide spiritual guidance to their followers; they are often the primary providers for a variety of local health and social services. Situated within communities and building on relationships of trust, these organizations have the ability to influence the attitudes and behaviours of their fellow community members. Moreover, they are in close and regular contact with all age groups in society and their word is respected. In fact, in some traditional communities, religious leaders are often more influential than local government officials or secular community leaders. Many of the case studies researched for the UNFPA publication Culture Matters showed that the involvement of faith-based organizations in UNFPA-supported projects enhanced negotiations with governments and civil society on culturally sensitive issues. Gradually, these experiences are being shared across countries andacross regions, which has facilitated interfaith dialogue on the most effective approaches to prevent the spread of HIV. Such dialogue has also helped convince various faith-based organizations that joining together as a united front is the most effective way to fight the spread of HIV and lessen the impact of AIDS. This manual is a capacity-building tool to help policy makers and programmers identify, design and follow up on HIV prevention programmes undertaken by FBOs. The manual can also be used by development practitioners partnering with FBOs to increase their understanding of the role of FBOs in HIV prevention, and to design plans for partnering with FBOs to halt the spread of the virus. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    318642

    Ghana: the AIDS Response project (GARFUND).

    World Bank. Africa Region. Operations Results and Learning Unit

    Findings Infobriefs. 2007 May; (136):[3] p.

    The specific objectives of this project - financed through an IDA credit of $28.7 million (2002-05) - were to : (i) provide resources that would enable the government to implement a balanced, diversified multi-sector response, engaging all relevant government sectors, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and grassroots initiatives; (ii) to expand contributions made by the Ministry of Health ( MOH ) engage civil society in the fight against AIDS; and (iii) finance eligible activities conducted by civil society organizations, including NGOs, community-based organizations (CBOs), faith-based organizations (FBOs), trade and professional associations, associations of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHAs), districts, and line ministries to ensure a rapid multisector scaling-up of HIV prevention and care activities in all regions and at all administrative levels. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    278314

    The Planned Parenthood Association of Thailand: prevention of domestic violence against women and children in Thailand through the promotion of reproductive health.

    Pekanan N; Wongsurawat K

    Innovations: Innovative Approaches to Population Programme Management. 2001; 9:73-100.

    Thailand is the third largest country among the Southeast Asian nations with an area of approximately 513,000 square kilometres. It has a total population of about 62 million with 95 percent of the population embracing Buddhism. Known for having a soft-spoken society rich in culture and high in spirituality, the general assumption is that domestic violence is rare. Yet such a state of security does not exist regardless of the culture that one belongs to. On many occasions domestic violence not only involves women, but children usually suffer the consequences as well. It is not unusual that such acts of violence are considered a family affair and thus many cases go unreported or unpublicised, perhaps out of the victims’ fear or simply from ignorance of their rights. The Thai government has come a long way in countering the prevalence of domestic violence through on-going efforts to amend its legal system and constitution. Demonstrating commitment to protect women and children from discrimination and violence, it has acknowledged various international treaties and even incorporated the rights and welfare of women and children in its National Plan framework. (excerpt)
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