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Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    320187

    Strengthening the capacity of community health workers to deliver care for sexual, reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2015. 20 p.

    Government institutions, United Nations agencies, and global partners have been repositioning the role that community health workers (CHWs) can play in increasing access to essential quality health services in the context of national primary health care and universal health coverage. Given the growing momentum and interest in training CHWs, the United Nations health agencies (H4+) have developed this technical brief to orient country programme managers and global partners as to key elements for strengthening the capacity of CHWs, including health system and programmatic considerations, core competencies, and evidence-informed interventions for CHWs along the SR/MNCAH continuum of care. These key elements need to be adapted and contextualized by countries to reflect the structure, gaps, and opportunities of the national primary health care system, the interaction between the health sector with other sectors, and the specific roles and competencies that CHWs already have within that system. These key elements should also guide H4+ members and partners to take a joint and harmonized approach to supporting countries in their capacity-development efforts. Annex 1 lists SR/MNCAH interventions that CHWs can perform based on the best available evidence and existing WHO guidance.
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  2. 2
    318642

    Ghana: the AIDS Response project (GARFUND).

    World Bank. Africa Region. Operations Results and Learning Unit

    Findings Infobriefs. 2007 May; (136):[3] p.

    The specific objectives of this project - financed through an IDA credit of $28.7 million (2002-05) - were to : (i) provide resources that would enable the government to implement a balanced, diversified multi-sector response, engaging all relevant government sectors, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and grassroots initiatives; (ii) to expand contributions made by the Ministry of Health ( MOH ) engage civil society in the fight against AIDS; and (iii) finance eligible activities conducted by civil society organizations, including NGOs, community-based organizations (CBOs), faith-based organizations (FBOs), trade and professional associations, associations of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHAs), districts, and line ministries to ensure a rapid multisector scaling-up of HIV prevention and care activities in all regions and at all administrative levels. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    295848

    Advocacy and Resource Mobilization for the 2010 Round of Censuses, New York, 24-25 February 2005.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]; United Nations. Statistics Division

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2005. [221] p.

    The United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) in collaboration with the United Nations Statistics Division (UNSD), organized an international meeting on "Advocacy and Resource Mobilization towards the Successful Implementation of the 2010 Round (2005-2014) of Population and Housing Censuses in Developing Countries" in New York on 24 and 25 February 2005. The meeting was attended by 64 participants from various United Nations agencies and affiliates, national statistics/census offices, bilateral donors, non-governmental organizations, and academic and technical organizations. The meeting also included representatives from developing country governmental policy-making and funding organizations. The meeting focused on: 1) a review of the problem areas experienced in the 2000 Round of Censuses, including the serious under-utilization and poor dissemination of census results at the national and sub-national levels; 2) a description of the 2010 World Programme on Population and Housing Censuses; 3) a discussion of proposed strategies for the successful implementation of the 2010 Round of Censuses; and 4) the development of an advocacy and resource mobilization plan for the 2010 Round, which identifies the resources needed to ensure successful implementation of the 2010 Round and emphasizes the value of censuses in measuring progress towards the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    294160
    Peer Reviewed

    The Bangkok Conference: steering countries to build national capacity for health promotion.

    Catford J

    Health Promotion International. 2005; 20(1):1-6.

    Millions of young people in the developing world never achieve two decades of life, let alone seven, and so it is with mixed feelings that Health Promotion International celebrates its 20th birthday this issue. Much has been written and said about the antecedents and milestones of the health promotion phenomenon, but what is clear from history is that any rapidly growing movement or organization needs to re-invigorate its purpose for existence as well as build its capacity for success. This is vital if health promotion is to be truly a response to both national and global challenges. The forthcoming Bangkok Conference and foreshadowed Bangkok Conference will seek to fill this gap. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    278314

    The Planned Parenthood Association of Thailand: prevention of domestic violence against women and children in Thailand through the promotion of reproductive health.

    Pekanan N; Wongsurawat K

    Innovations: Innovative Approaches to Population Programme Management. 2001; 9:73-100.

    Thailand is the third largest country among the Southeast Asian nations with an area of approximately 513,000 square kilometres. It has a total population of about 62 million with 95 percent of the population embracing Buddhism. Known for having a soft-spoken society rich in culture and high in spirituality, the general assumption is that domestic violence is rare. Yet such a state of security does not exist regardless of the culture that one belongs to. On many occasions domestic violence not only involves women, but children usually suffer the consequences as well. It is not unusual that such acts of violence are considered a family affair and thus many cases go unreported or unpublicised, perhaps out of the victims’ fear or simply from ignorance of their rights. The Thai government has come a long way in countering the prevalence of domestic violence through on-going efforts to amend its legal system and constitution. Demonstrating commitment to protect women and children from discrimination and violence, it has acknowledged various international treaties and even incorporated the rights and welfare of women and children in its National Plan framework. (excerpt)
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