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Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    332320

    Country-led monitoring and evaluation systems. Better evidence, better policies, better development results.

    Segone M

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNICEF, Regional Office for CEE/CIS, 2009. [322] p.

    This collection of articles by UNICEF discusses how to improve evidence-based decision making in developing countries through the use of monitoring and evaluation systems. While information on programmatic best practices is available, knowledge bases in developing countries still have significant gaps. This book forges the link between learning about evidence-based policymaking and the contributions that country-led monitoring and evaluation systems can make in supporting good decision making.
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  2. 2
    314958
    Peer Reviewed

    Advancement of global health: key messages from the Disease Control Priorities Project.

    Laxminarayan R; Mills AJ; Breman JG; Measham AR; Alleyne G

    Lancet. 2006 Apr 8; 367(9517):1193-1208.

    The Disease Control Priorities Project (DCPP), a joint project of the Fogarty International Center of the US National Institutes of Health, the WHO, and The World Bank, was launched in 2001 to identify policy changes and intervention strategies for the health problems of low-income and middle-income countries. Nearly 500 experts worldwide compiled and reviewed the scientific research on a broad range of diseases and conditions, the results of which are published this week. A major product of DCPP, Disease Control Priorities in Developing Countries, 2nd edition (DCP2), focuses on the assessment of the cost-effectiveness of health-improving strategies (or interventions) for the conditions responsible for the greatest burden of disease. DCP2 also examines crosscutting issues crucial to the delivery of quality health services, including the organisation, financial support, and capacity of health systems. Here, we summarise the key messages of the project. (author's)
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  3. 3
    313133

    Good policy and practice in HIV and AIDS and education. Booklet 1: Overview.

    Attawell K; Elder K

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2006 May. 24 p. (Good Policy and Practice in HIV and AIDS and Education Booklet No. 1; ED-2006/WS/2; cld 26002)

    HIV and AIDS affect the demand for, supply and quality of education. In some countries, the epidemic is reducing demand for education, as children become sick or are taken out of school and as fewer households are financially able to support their children?s education. However, it is difficult to generalize about the impact of HIV and AIDS on educational demand and important not to make assumptions about declining enrolments. Lack of accurate data on this question is a problem. For example, in Botswana absenteeism rates are relatively low in primary schools and there is some evidence to show that orphans have better attendance records than non-orphans. In Malawi and Uganda, where absenteeism is high among all primary school age students, there is less difference in school attendance between orphans and non-orphans than expected . (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    183614

    Capacity building in reproductive health programmes focusing on male involvement: a South-to-South framework.

    Duza MB

    In: Programming for male involvement in reproductive health. Report of the meeting of WHO Regional Advisers in Reproductive Health, WHO / PAHO, Washington DC, USA, 5-7 September 2001. Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2002. 115-129. (WHO/FCH/RHR/02.3)

    The issue of male involvement in reproductive health is enigmatic. It has traditionally been held that men's role and voice are decisive in the family building process and reproductive health outcomes of both males and females. At the same time, against the backdrop of recent and ongoing experience, men also have been characterized as the neglected half in the pertinent programmes, playing a tangential role relative to women. Within this general area, the present paper explores the opportunities for capacity building in reproductive health programmes, keeping in view some critical areas where male involvement appears to be especially relevant. The exercise is undertaken in light of lessons learned in the South-to- South framework of inter-country sharing and exchange of experience in the field. Possible institutional strengthening towards increased and effective male involvement is considered in order to address capacity-building needs at the level of policy makers, programme managers, service providers and clients. (author's)
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  5. 5
    175636

    Monitoring development progress: data collection needs and challenges. Background paper for the Fifth Asian and Pacific Population Conference, Senior Officials Segment, 11-14 December 2002, Bangkok.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]. Technical Support Division. Population and Development Study Branch

    Bangkok, Thailand, ESCAP, 2002 Nov 26. 9 p. (PRUDD/SAPPC/INF.9)

    Population-based data and indicators are crucial for national and sub-national policies and plans, for development frameworks, such as the United Nations' Common Country Assessment (CCAs) and the Poverty Reduction Strategies Papers (PRSPs), for national and global tracking of progress towards the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) derived from the global United Nations conferences and summits of the 1990s, for results based management, as well as for evidence based policy dialogue. The increased demand for indicators to measure development progress, has heightened national and international awareness of the need to build sustainable statistical capacity for the collection of timely and relevant statistics for policy formulation and programme management. The ability to provide timely indicators to measure development progress requires several data collection sources and instruments, as well as a well-resourced national statistical system. This paper reviews the data needs for monitoring development progress. (excerpt)
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