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  1. 1
    383099
    Peer Reviewed

    A decade of investments in monitoring the HIV epidemic: how far have we come? A descriptive analysis.

    Alfven T; McDougal L; Frescura L; Aran C; Amler P; Gill W

    Health Research Policy and Systems. 2014; 12:62.

    BACKGROUND: The 2001 Declaration of Commitment (DoC) adopted by the General Assembly Special Session on HIV/AIDS (UNGASS) included a call to monitor national responses to the HIV epidemic. Since the DoC, efforts and investments have been made globally to strengthen countries' HIV monitoring and evaluation (M&E) capacity. This analysis aims to quantify HIV M&E investments, commitments, capacity, and performance during the last decade in order to assess the success and challenges of national and global HIV M&E systems. METHODS: M&E spending and performance was assessed using data from UNGASS country progress reports. The National Composite Policy Index (NCPI) was used to measure government commitment, government engagement, partner/civil society engagement, and data generation, as well as to generate a composite HIV M&E System Capacity Index (MESCI) score. Analyses were restricted to low and middle income countries (LMICs) who submitted NCPI reports in 2006, 2008, and 2010 (n = 78). RESULTS: Government commitment to HIV M&E increased considerably between 2006 and 2008 but decreased between 2008 and 2010. The percentage of total AIDS spending allocated to HIV M&E increased from 1.1% to 1.4%, between 2007 and 2010, in high-burden LMICs. Partner/civil society engagement and data generation capacity improved between 2006 and 2010 in the high-burden countries. The HIV MESCI increased from 2006 to 2008 in high-burden countries (78% to 94%), as well as in other LMICs (70% to 77%), and remained relatively stable in 2010 (91% in high-burden countries, 79% in other LMICs). Among high-burden countries, M&E system performance increased from 52% in 2006 to 89% in 2010. CONCLUSIONS: The last decade has seen increased commitments and spending on HIV M&E, as well as improved M&E capacity and more available data on the HIV epidemic in both high-burden and other LMICs. However, challenges remain in the global M&E of the AIDS epidemic as we approach the 2015 Millennium Development Goal targets.
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  2. 2
    319234

    Improving performance of IDSR at district and facility levels: experiences in Tanzania and Ghana in making IDSR operational.

    Franco LM; Setzer J; Banke K

    Bethesda, Maryland, Abt Associates, Partners for Health Reform Plus, 2006 Sep. [120] p. (USAID Contract No. HRN-C-00-00-00019-00)

    Recognition of the need for effective disease surveillance and response is growing worldwide due to increased risks of infectious diseases associated with population mobility, globalization, and emerging and resurging diseases. The Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR) strategy, promoted and supported by the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Africa (AFRO), has been adopted throughout the region's 46 countries to strengthen surveillance systems such that they inform public health decisions and disease control actions. This document describes the efforts of the Partners for Health Reformplus (PHRplus) project in Ghana and Tanzania to support improvements in the performance of IDSR. Ghana and Tanzania sought to address concurrently the technical, organizational and workforce issues that could impede IDSR performance. The most notable improvements were seen in reporting, analysis, and interpretation of surveillance data. Strengthening and maintaining IDSR performance, however, is also dependent the following: ensuring on-going supervision and follow-up; ensuring IDSR visibility and leadership at all levels; understanding the links between IDSR and health system decentralization; and addressing structural barriers to IDSR that are a function of the overall health system. (author's)
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  3. 3
    314958
    Peer Reviewed

    Advancement of global health: key messages from the Disease Control Priorities Project.

    Laxminarayan R; Mills AJ; Breman JG; Measham AR; Alleyne G

    Lancet. 2006 Apr 8; 367(9517):1193-1208.

    The Disease Control Priorities Project (DCPP), a joint project of the Fogarty International Center of the US National Institutes of Health, the WHO, and The World Bank, was launched in 2001 to identify policy changes and intervention strategies for the health problems of low-income and middle-income countries. Nearly 500 experts worldwide compiled and reviewed the scientific research on a broad range of diseases and conditions, the results of which are published this week. A major product of DCPP, Disease Control Priorities in Developing Countries, 2nd edition (DCP2), focuses on the assessment of the cost-effectiveness of health-improving strategies (or interventions) for the conditions responsible for the greatest burden of disease. DCP2 also examines crosscutting issues crucial to the delivery of quality health services, including the organisation, financial support, and capacity of health systems. Here, we summarise the key messages of the project. (author's)
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