Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 6 Results

  1. 1
    333225

    Better health for women and families: The World Bank’s Reproductive Health Action Plan 2010–2015.

    Chowdhury SA; Tandon A; Bos E; Mills S; Saadat S; Lie GS; Arias V

    [Washington, D.C]., World Bank. 2010 May. [82] p.

    Reproductive health is a key facet of human development. Improved reproductive health outcomes -- lower fertility rates, better pregnancy outcomes, and fewer sexually transmitted infections -- have broader individual, family, and societal benefits. The benefits include a healthier and more productive work force, greater financial and other resources for each child in smaller families, and enabling young women to delay childbearing until they have achieved educational and other goals. Women's full and equal participation in the development process is contingent on accessing essential reproductive health services, including the ability to make voluntary and informed decisions about fertility. Reproductive health issues have only recently begun to be a priority in the development agenda. Even though Official Development Assistance (ODA) for reproductive health has increased, the share of health ODA going to reproductive health declined in the past decade. This document presents a detailed operationalization of the reproductive health component of the Bank's 2007 Health, Nutrition, and Population (HNP) strategy.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    316772

    Gender approaches in conflict and post-conflict situations.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]. Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery

    New York, New York, UNDP, Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery, 2002 Oct. 28 p.

    This manual was compiled during a seminar entitled "Approccio di genere in situazioni di emergenza, conflitto e post-conflitto" (Gender approach in emergency, conflict, and postconflict situations), which was held in Rome on 2-6 April 2001. The seminar was organized by the UNDP Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery in Rome and the Emergency division of the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and included participants from various Italian non governmental organizations (NGOs) and UN agencies directly involved in emergency, crisis response and recovery operations. During the seminar, a needs assessment session was held and participants expressed their interest in having a "how to" manual that could help them better integrate a gender approach during humanitarian, recovery and development activities. The first chapter contains information on the approaches to women and gender issues over the last 20 years. It provides the basic concepts necessary to understand how to address gender issues and improve the impact of humanitarian assistance. In the second chapter, the relevant international instruments protecting the rights of people affected by war and other emergency situations are presented. Relevant passages are quoted and explained. The full text of these instruments can be found in the annexed CD-ROM. The third chapter contains information that can be used as reference in programming and organizing humanitarian interventions with a gender perspective. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    311697

    Campaigning with partners for the MDGs: a case study of Brazil.

    Dimitrova D; de Oliveira MC

    New York, New York, United Nations Development Programme [UNDP], [2005]. 14 p.

    The deepening of democratic institutions, gains in macroeconomic stability and rapid expansion of prosperity contribute to an overall encouraging context for sustainable development in Brazil. Yet, despite these numerous advances, real poverty has only moderately declined, and inequality persists. In Brazil, economic and social status tends to vary by geography, race and gender, a legacy of the country's history. Imposed and de facto colonial and post-colonial divisions among indigenous peoples and descendents of Portuguese settlers, African slaves and European, Middle Eastern and Asian immigrants created persistent structures of exclusion and inequality. In the 1950s, during the military government, a strategy of import substitution prioritized rapid industrial expansion, and helped to bring about significant, sustained economic growth. Benefits, however, accrued disproportionately to the upper classes at the expense of workers and unions. The industrialization contributed to the expansion of the favelas (urban slums), one of Brazil's greatest contemporary challenges, by promoting urban migration while infrastructure and social support did not expand at the same pace. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    300179

    Hope. Building capacity. Least developed countries meet the HIV / AIDS challenge.

    United Nations. Office of the High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and the Small Island Developing States [UN-OHRLLS]; United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]

    New York, New York, UN-OHRLLS, [2005]. [28] p.

    Roughly a quarter of the world’s countries are classified as Least Developed Countries (LDCs), who remain the most vulnerable and weakest segment of the international community, of these 34 are in Africa, 15 in Asia-Pacific and one in the Caribbean. It is now clear that without achieving a huge acceleration in their development efforts, few global development targets can be met. The AIDS pandemic is worsening the prospects of LDCs as many of the hardest hit countries are facing massive financial and human resource constraints. These countries by definition have limited resources to generate sufficient economic and social development, and as such are at greater risk. HIV/AIDS is eroding these limited resources and affecting the most productive people so urgently needed for development. In other words, HIV/AIDS affects the present and future human and institutional capacities of countries and consequently their capacity to generate economic and social development. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    296474

    Enhancing support of African development - includes a definition of the African Initiative - Special Initiative on Africa - Cover story.

    UN Chronicle. 1996 Summer; 33(2):[7] p..

    The Special Initiative on Africa, launched globally on 15 March by the Secretary-General along with the executive heads of all UN agencies and organizations represented in the Administrative Committee on Coordination (ACC), aims to give practical expression to the policy commitments made in the past, such as the UN New Agenda for the Development of Africa in the 1990s. Unprecedented in scope, the Initiative reflects the priority accorded to Africa's development by the international community, the mandates emanating from the General Assembly, the Economic and Social Council and major UN conferences, as well as the undertakings made individually and collectively by African Governments to accelerate the development of their countries. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    280253

    Reproductive health: report by the Secretariat.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2004 Apr 15. 15 p. (A57/13)

    By resolution WHA55.19, the Health Assembly requested the Director-General “to develop a strategy for accelerating progress towards attainment of international development goals and targets related to reproductive health … .” A progress report setting out the key elements of the strategy and summarizing the Executive Board’s comments thereon was reviewed and noted by the Fifty-sixth World Health Assembly. In order to ensure maximum involvement of Member States and other interested parties in the development of the strategy, four regional consultations were held: for the South-East Asia and Western Pacific Regions jointly (Colombo, 2-4 June 2003), for the European Region (Copenhagen, 5-7 June 2003), the Region of the Americas (Washington, DC, 11-13 June 2003), and jointly for the African and Eastern Mediterranean Regions (Harare, 7-9 July 2003). The aim of these meetings was two-fold: to review country-level experiences and lessons learnt in implementing reproductive health strategies, policies and programmes; and to review, and make recommendations on, the draft global reproductive health strategy. WHO subsequently convened a meeting of experts (Geneva, 18 and 19 September 2003) to provide final input into the draft strategy. The resulting text is annexed. The draft strategy was considered by the Board at its 113th session in January 2004. The Board adopted resolution EB113.R11, which contained a further resolution recommending the Fifty-seventh World Health Assembly, inter alia, to endorse the strategy. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.