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Your search found 6 Results

  1. 1
    333453

    Technical support facilities: Helping to build an efficient and sustainable AIDS response. UNAIDS TSF 5 years report, 2011.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2011 Oct. [60] p. (UNAIDS / JC2167E)

    This report highlights the role that the Technical Support Facilities (TSF) have played in Africa and Asia to strengthen countries capacities to fund, plan, manage and coordinate effective, larger scale HIV programs. Established by UNAIDS in 2005, the TSFs have provided support to over 70 countries through 50,000 days of technical assistance and capacity development.
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  2. 2
    325490

    A trickle or a flood: Commitments and disbursement for HIV / AIDS from the Global Fund, PEPFAR, and the World Bank’s Multi-Country AIDS Program (MAP).

    Bernstein M; Sessions M

    [Washington, D.C.], Center for Global Development, HIV / AIDS Monitor, 2007 Mar 5. 26 p.

    This paper provides an analytical framework for understanding funders' disbursement policies and practices while also offering an overview of the total volume of resources being committed and disbursed by each funder. The analysis is focused on the global-level, but does provide brief country case studies to help understand some of the implications of these large inflows of funding for HIV/AIDS at the country-level. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    325489

    Following the funding for HIV / AIDS: a comparative analysis of the funding practices of PEPFAR, the Global Fund and World Bank MAP in Mozambique, Uganda and Zambia.

    Oomman N; Bernstein M; Rosenzweig S

    [Washington, D.C.], Center for Global Development, HIV / AIDS Monitor, 2007 Oct 10. [98] p.

    Donor funding for HIV/AIDS has reached levels unprecedented in the history of global health: annual funding for AIDS in low- and middle-income countries increased 30-fold from 1996 to 2006, from US$ 300 million to US$ 8.9 billion. While funding remains far short of the estimated need, international donor commitments for HIV/AIDS are significant, and likely to be so, well into the future. The resources for AIDS are a topic of considerable interest and debate internationally, yet little is understood about how these resources are actually being spent, and whether they are being made available as efficiently and effectively as possible for the fight against AIDS. Through the lens of what is happening in several countries in sub-Saharan Africa, this paper examines the flow of resources from three of the world's largest AIDS donors: the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund), and the World Bank's Multi-Country HIV/AIDS Program for Africa (MAP). Drawing on country-level research undertaken by collaborating local research organizations, we describe the levels and types of funding from these donors, and highlight the procedures through which funds are committed, released and accounted for in three countries in which all of the programs are active: Mozambique, Uganda, and Zambia. Through this close look at how money moves from donor to specific purposes, we describe bottlenecks and other difficulties in the disbursement of funds, document the way their disbursement systems attempt to build national capacity to fight AIDS, and identify specific ways in which the donor agencies could make the resources move more efficiently. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    323312

    Bringing water to Africa's poor: Expanded access requires more funds, efficiency and capacity.

    Dovi E

    Africa Renewal. 2007 Oct; 21(3):7.

    Until six years ago, Eugenia Uwamahoro and several of her eight children had to trek 2 kilometres each day to a river to get about 140 litres of water for drinking, cooking, washing and feeding her four cows. There was a water pump in her village, Nyakabingo, in Rwanda's Gicumbi district, but it hardly functioned. Then the Rwandan government, with financial support from the UN Children's Fund (UNICEF), repaired the pump, and the community contracted a private manager to maintain it. "It has improved my life," Ms. Uwamahoro told African Renewal. "Now we can rest." Not only has the pump saved her considerable time and effort, but she also gets her household's daily water supply at lower cost than she would have from the private village water carriers who cart it up from the river. Many villagers "are happy to pay for the improved service," says Kamaru Tstoneste, who operates the pump. But some villagers cannot afford the cost. So community leaders compiled a list of the neediest households, and review it from time to time. "This group gets an agreed quantity of free supply," Mr. Tstoneste told Africa Renewal. Still, he adds, "Old habits die hard. There are those who refuse to pay for water and still go to the river." (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    314958
    Peer Reviewed

    Advancement of global health: key messages from the Disease Control Priorities Project.

    Laxminarayan R; Mills AJ; Breman JG; Measham AR; Alleyne G

    Lancet. 2006 Apr 8; 367(9517):1193-1208.

    The Disease Control Priorities Project (DCPP), a joint project of the Fogarty International Center of the US National Institutes of Health, the WHO, and The World Bank, was launched in 2001 to identify policy changes and intervention strategies for the health problems of low-income and middle-income countries. Nearly 500 experts worldwide compiled and reviewed the scientific research on a broad range of diseases and conditions, the results of which are published this week. A major product of DCPP, Disease Control Priorities in Developing Countries, 2nd edition (DCP2), focuses on the assessment of the cost-effectiveness of health-improving strategies (or interventions) for the conditions responsible for the greatest burden of disease. DCP2 also examines crosscutting issues crucial to the delivery of quality health services, including the organisation, financial support, and capacity of health systems. Here, we summarise the key messages of the project. (author's)
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  6. 6
    284284

    Optimizing resource allocation for HIV prevention. Regional Initiative FY04-05. Concept note.

    World Bank

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, [2004]. [4] p.

    HIV infection has taken root in South Asia, and poses a serious threat to development and poverty alleviation efforts in the region. The current trend of increasing HIV infections, combined with heightened social and economic vulnerabilities that are fueled by massive population movements (cross-border/rural-urban migration and trafficking), a pervasive sex industry, and the presence of injecting drug use, highlights the urgent need to act quickly and effectively. Denial of the HIV/AIDS epidemic has led to devastating economic and social consequences, which are now well documented. Recognizing this potential threat, South Asian countries, with the support of the donor community, have intensified the fight against HIV/AIDS; the speed, level, and quality of response, however, continue to vary across the region. There is a need for sustained advocacy to increase political commitment and for operationally relevant analytic work to improve the technical efficiency and effectiveness of the national programs. Financial resources to fight HIV/AIDS in South Asia have increased significantly over the past few years, with new donors such as the Global Fund and the Gates Foundation taking a greater prominence in supporting country efforts. Resource constraints, however, remain; as there is a growing demand, as well as increasing commitment, of the national programs to provide anti-retro viral treatment, and at the same time, scale up prevention. As such, South Asian countries recognize the importance of making better decisions for how best to allocate resources available for HIV/AIDS prevention. There is, however, a need to strengthen capacity of the national programs to undertake analysis and to utilize this information for policy formulation and program design. The World Bank, being the leader in providing economic advice on AIDS, has a clear and strong comparative advantage, in relation to other agencies, including UN partners and bilaterals, to assist the South Asia region in addressing this need. (excerpt)
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