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Your search found 24 Results

  1. 1
    375880

    Strengthening health systems to respond to women subjected to intimate partner violence or sexual violence: a manual for health managers.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2017. 172 p.

    This manual is intended for health managers at all levels of the health systems. The manual is based on the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline Responding to intimate partner violence and sexual violence against women: WHO clinical and policy guidelines, 2013. Those guidelines inform this manual and its companion clinical handbook for healthcare providers, Health care for women subjected to intimate partner violence or sexual violence, 2014. The manual draws on the WHO health systems building blocks as outlined in Everybody’s business: strengthening health systems to improve health outcomes: WHO’s framework for action..
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  2. 2
    340314

    WHO Global Forum for Government Chief Nursing and Midwifery Officers, 18-19 May 2016, Geneva, Switzerland. The future of nursing and midwifery workforce in the context of the Sustainable Development Goals and universal health coverage. Forum statement.

    WHO Global Forum for Government Chief Nursing and Midwifery Officers (2016: Geneva)

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2016. [2] p.

    The goal of the World Health Organization and its Member States is to achieve the highest attainable levels of health for all people. A number of health development approaches have been directed toward this goal from primary health care in the 70’s through to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and the current Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The commitment made by Member States to universal health coverage reinforces the need for strengthened nursing and midwifery contribution to achieve good health outcomes. Although many countries still have nursing and midwifery workforce shortages, we the Government Chief Nursing and Midwifery Officers recognize that in addition to increasing our numbers, more must be done in order to realize these professions full potential. Consequently, we acknowledge the importance of ensuring the quality, acceptability, relevance and sustainability of our future nursing and midwifery workforce. Strengthening nursing and midwifery services in our respective countries is possible by using the latest evidence-based knowledge and relevant technologies to create policies and management systems that support practice and leadership which deliver quality services to individuals and communities within the distinctiveness of our health systems. In the context of this Forum and in support of the Global Strategy on Human Resources for Health: Workforce 2030 and the Global Strategic Directions for Strengthening Nursing and Midwifery 2016-2020, we commit ourselves to: a) Strengthening governance and accountability, b) Maximizing capacity and capability and realising the potential of the nursing and midwifery workforce and c) Mobilizing political will, commitment and investments for nursing and midwifery.
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  3. 3
    354913
    Peer Reviewed

    Building capacities and producing citizens: The biopolitics of HIV prevention in Brazil.

    de la Dehesa R; Mukherjea A

    Contemporary Politics. 2012 Jun; 18(2):186-199.

    Capacity-building has become a mainstay of many AIDS and public health programmes. This article examines its impact on civil society organisations and claims-making around citizenship, as these have been articulated through heterogeneous policy networks doing HIV prevention work. Drawing on a growing literature on the Foucauldian notions of biopower and governmentality, the genealogy of capacity-building as a globalised technology of governmentality is traced, examining its uses both at the international level and in Brazil. Brazilian civil society organisations have undoubtedly been transformed by their participation in networks carrying out capacity-building projects. While recognising these effects, the conflicts and productive tensions inherent to such networks are highlighted.
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  4. 4
    333215

    The Maternal Health Thematic Fund: Annual report 2010.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, [2011]. [118] p.

    UNFPA's Maternal Health Thematic Fund, initiated in early 2008, represents a focused effort to accelerate progress towards saving women's lives and achieving universal access to reproductive health, as outlined in Millennium Development Goal 5. This report outlines the activities, results and achievements from 2010 and looks ahead at future challenges. It also features results from the Campaign to End Fistula and the ICM-UNFPA midwifery project and illustrates that significant progress can be made by adopting proven strategies -- including family planning, skilled care during childbirth, and expanded access and utilization of emergency obstetric and newborn care -- combined with partnerships for better coordination under national leadership.
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  5. 5
    339656

    Operational plan for UNAIDS Action Framework: addressing women, girls, gender equality and HIV.

    UNAIDS. Global Task Force on Women, Girls, Gender Equality and HIV

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, [2009]. vi, 27 p.

    This framework was developed to help address persistent gender inequality and human rights violations. These violations put women and girls at greater risk of HIV and threaten the gains that have been made in preventing HIV transmission and increasing access to antiretroviral treatment.
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  6. 6
    332290

    Supporting country-led initiatives to strengthen national health information systems in East Africa.

    Coleman T; Garten AD

    Washington, D.C., Futures Group, Health Policy Initiative, 2009 Oct. [34] p. (USAID Contract No. GPO-I-01-05-00040-00)

    In response to a growing recognition of the importance of reliable and timely health information systems (HIS) to support improved decisionmaking for public health action and health systems strengthening, USAID supported a regional forum in East Africa that focused on engaging HIS champions from key public sectors -- including health, finance, telecommunications, and vital statistics -- and supporting country ownership of HIS. Toward that end, delegations from six focus countries (Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda, with Namibia and Sudan as observers) convened for a three-day workshop, "Country Ownership Strategies: Leadership Forum on Health Information Systems," in Addis Ababa from August 10-13, 2009. As part of the preparation and planning for this forum, the USAID |Health Policy Initiative, Task Order 1 designed and executed a semi-structured qualitative survey to capture the current state of HIS in each of the six focus countries. This report highlights the results of that survey and includes background materials that supported the survey process. Given the overall success of the first forum, USAID is exploring ways to replicate this activity in other regions and continue to provide country-specific technical and financial assistance for HIS strengthening..
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  7. 7
    332100

    Supporting community responses to malaria: A training manual to strengthen capacities of community based organizations in application processes of the Global Fund to Fight HIV / AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

    Odindo M; Mangelsdorf A

    Cologne, Germany, STOP MALARIA NOW!, 2009 Nov. 53 p.

    This training manual is a product of the STOP MALARIA NOW! advocacy campaign and aims to support community responses to malaria. In particular, this manual aims to improve knowledge and skills of Community Based Organizations (CBOs) in application processes of the Global Fund to Fight HIV / AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. The contents are based on results of the needs assessment 'Capacity Needs of CBOs in Kenya in Terms of Application Processes of the Global Fund to Fight HIV /AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM)', conducted in June and July 2009.
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  8. 8
    332015

    The Fistula Fortnight: Healing Wounds, Renewing Hope, 21 February - 6 March 2005, Kano, Katsina, Kebbi and Sokoto States, Nigeria.

    Iliyasu Z; Idoko L; Ramsey K

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], [2007]. 46 p.

    The Fistula Fortnight accomplished a number of goals: it mobilized resources for obstetric fistula and safe motherhood; increased public awareness that fistula is preventable; contributed to combating the marginalization of women who suffer from fistula; strengthened institutional capacity to manage fistula; and began to address the broader needs of women living with the disability. While the surgeries conducted represent only a small portion of the backlog, the Fistula Fortnight provided a strategic opportunity to raise awareness and motivate action among policymakers, national and local leaders, and the general public about the need to increase efforts to both prevent and treat fistula. (Excerpt)
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  9. 9
    325462

    Another way to learn... Case studies.

    Dada M

    Paris, France, UNESCO, Education Sector, Division for the Coordination of UN Priorities in Education, Section on HIV and AIDS, 2007. 83 p. (ED-2006/WS/43)

    The purpose of this publication is to share UNESCO's experience and our thinking behind a number of projects that have sought to address the needs of some of the disadvantaged and in particular those impacted by drug misuse. The experience of these projects demonstrates key factors that impinge progress towards social inclusion: homelessness; unemployment; discrimination and stigma; low levels of education; health inequalities; crime and violence. (excerpt)
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  10. 10
    322594

    A nongovernmental organization's national response to HIV: the work of the All-Ukrainian Network of People Living with HIV.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2007 Jul. 47 p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection; UNAIDS/07.23E; JC1305E)

    The All-Ukrainian Network of People Living with HIV/AIDS (the 'Network') was formed in the late 1990s by HIV-positive individuals alarmed at the surging HIV epidemic in their country and the lack of resources and support for themselves and others living with the virus. It has grown rapidly and steadily since then, providing services and support to more than 14 000 people living with HIV. Its roots are in the self-help ethos, based on the belief that people living with HIV must be directly involved in leading national and local responses to HIV. The Network's four key strategy components are: increasing access to non-medical care, treatment and support; lobbying and advocating to protect the rights of people living with HIV; seeking to increase acceptance towards people living with HIV throughout society; and enhancing the organizational capacity of the Network. (excerpt)
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  11. 11
    311697

    Campaigning with partners for the MDGs: a case study of Brazil.

    Dimitrova D; de Oliveira MC

    New York, New York, United Nations Development Programme [UNDP], [2005]. 14 p.

    The deepening of democratic institutions, gains in macroeconomic stability and rapid expansion of prosperity contribute to an overall encouraging context for sustainable development in Brazil. Yet, despite these numerous advances, real poverty has only moderately declined, and inequality persists. In Brazil, economic and social status tends to vary by geography, race and gender, a legacy of the country's history. Imposed and de facto colonial and post-colonial divisions among indigenous peoples and descendents of Portuguese settlers, African slaves and European, Middle Eastern and Asian immigrants created persistent structures of exclusion and inequality. In the 1950s, during the military government, a strategy of import substitution prioritized rapid industrial expansion, and helped to bring about significant, sustained economic growth. Benefits, however, accrued disproportionately to the upper classes at the expense of workers and unions. The industrialization contributed to the expansion of the favelas (urban slums), one of Brazil's greatest contemporary challenges, by promoting urban migration while infrastructure and social support did not expand at the same pace. (excerpt)
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  12. 12
    307060

    AIDS in the developing world: an interview with Peter Piot.

    Piot P; O'Rourke M

    AIDS Clinical Care. 2000 Jan; 12(1):1-3, 5.

    I am the Executive Director of UNAIDS and an Assistant Secretary General of the United Nations. I have an MD and a PhD in microbiology. I've been working in AIDS full-time since 1983, when I was in Zaire documenting the epidemic in central Africa, which was still quite new at the time and -- unlike in the West -- was being transmitted mostly through heterosexual intercourse. UNAIDS was established 4 years ago by the member states of the United Nations to coordinate the efforts of the richly diverse UN organizations in combating the AIDS epidemic. I think that it was quite forward looking for the member nations to establish this agency, because it wasn't entirely clear at that time that AIDS was going to become the major threat to development that it now represents in regions such as sub-Saharan Africa. UNAIDS is actually the secretariat of multi-agency effort including the World Bank, the WHO, UNICEF, UNESCO (UN Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization), and several others. Each organization is equipped to handle different aspects of the epidemic. The WHO focuses on blood safety, treatment of sexually transmitted diseases, and care for persons with AIDS. UNICEF deals with prevention of perinatal transmission, care for orphans, and mobilization of youth groups. UNESCO deals with disseminating prevention information through schools. The World Bank works on financing these programs. (excerpt)
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  13. 13
    303747

    UNDP response to HIV / AIDS.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]. Bureau for Development Policy. HIV / AIDS Group; United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]. Communications Office

    New York, New York, UNDP, 2004 Jul. [2] p.

    The HIV/AIDS epidemic is one of the world's most serious development crises. An estimated 3 million people died of AIDS in 2003 and 5 million acquired HIV -- bringing the number of people living with the virus around the world to 38 million. Without decisive action, not only will we fail to achieve the goal of reversing the spread of HIV/AIDS, but worse: the number of people infected is likely to double in less than a decade. International funding to respond to the epidemic has increased, but it will take comprehensive and sustained intervention in both high and low prevalence countries to turn the tide. (excerpt)
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  14. 14
    303522

    Reviewing UNFPA's role in PopEd programmes.

    Adolescence Education Newsletter. 2005 Jun; 8(1):3-4.

    EDUCATION PROGRAMMES for young people can be intricately linked to development goals (left). This was illustrated in a document released last year based on a technical review of UNFPA's three-decade experience in Population Education (PopEd). UNFPA PopEd programmes could be categorized into: 1) Population and Family Life Education; 2) Sexuality Education; and 3) Life Skills Education. Common elements of all programmes are: advocacy to promote an enabling socio-political environment; capacity-building through teacher training and development of curriculum and materials; and peer education. (excerpt)
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  15. 15
    300918

    Corporate strategy on HIV / AIDS.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]. Bureau for Development Policy. HIV / AIDS Group

    New York, New York, UNDP, Bureau for Development Policy, HIV / AIDS Group, [2004]. 8 p.

    Twenty years on, the HIV/AIDS epidemic continues to spread without respite. Almost 40 million people are living with HIV and AIDS, half of them women. The impact of HIV/AIDS is unique because it kills adults in the most productive period of their lives, depriving families, communities, and nations of their most productive people. Adding to an already heavy disease burden in poor countries, the epidemic is deepening poverty, reversing human development, worsening gender inequalities, eroding the capacity of governments to provide essential services, reducing labour productivity, and hampering pro-poor growth. The epidemic is quickly becoming the biggest obstacle to achieving the Millennium Development Goals. (excerpt)
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  16. 16
    300908

    Breakthrough: UNDP's response to HIV / AIDS.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]

    New York, New York, UNDP, 2004 Jun. 34 p.

    Something remarkable is happening in many parts of the world. Faced with a common enemy, people from different countries are discovering a shared goal. These are ordinary men and women who until recently had thought of HIV/AIDS as something that happened to other people. Responding to the epidemic has today become a passionate cause for each one. These individuals and groups are linked by one common factor: They have all been part of UNDP's Leadership for Results programme-- a unique and innovative process that helps to create an enabling environment to halt and reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS, by fostering hope, generating transformation and producing breakthrough results. (excerpt)
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  17. 17
    297797

    UNESCO's response to HIV and AIDS.

    UNESCO. International Institute for Educational Planning. HIV / AIDS Coordination Unit; UNESCO. Bureau for Field Coordination

    Paris, France, UNESCO, International Institute for Educational Planning, HIV / AIDS Coordination Unit, 2005. 42 p. (IIEP/Oct.2005/UHIV/UNESRES/01.R1)

    UNESCO's distinctive combination of expertise in education, science, social sciences, culture and communications gives it an interdisciplinary organizational and technical capacity that is particularly suited to working on education for prevention in an effort to halt the spread of HIV and AIDS. With all its partners, UNESCO has adopted a strong advocacy role for issues relating to HIV and AIDS. It is emphasising the linkages between HIV and AIDS education and poverty eradication; overcoming the disadvantages and disparities experienced by women and girls; supporting the understanding and practice of human rights; and adapting messages to diverse cultural and traditional contexts. This work is being carried out within the context of achieving the goals and targets of the Education for All (EFA) effort and the Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS, adopted at the United Nations General Assembly Special Session on HIV/AIDS (UNGASS). UNESCO is strengthening its engagement with regional, sub-regional and national institutions for a better coordination of efforts to support locally owned plans and strategies for responding to HIV and AIDS. When dealing with education ministries, UNESCO ensures that its support for HIV and AIDS education accords with the financial, management and programme framework of the country's educational plans, in particular those relating to EFA goals and HIV and AIDS prevention. (excerpt)
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  18. 18
    297496

    EFA flagship initiatives. Multi-partner collaborative mechanisms in support of EFA goals.

    Mputu H; Lawale S

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2004. 55 p. (ED-2004/WS/16)

    The World Education Forum held in Dakar (April, 2000) reemphasized and reiterated the importance of inter-agency partnerships, collaboration and coordination in pursuance of the EFA goals. This facilitated the launching of a number of multi-partner initiatives that focused on specific EFA-related areas and problems requiring special attention as well as the reinforcing of existing ones. EFA flagship initiatives were considered to constitute, among others, one of the mechanisms that would contribute in enhancing and strengthening multi-agency partnership and coherence on EFA related goals. Three years after Dakar, the EFA flagships continue to expand in terms of number of initiatives launched as well as their scope and membership. At present, nine initiatives have been established, involving United Nations organizations, bilateral and multilateral agencies and NGOs. (excerpt)
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  19. 19
    295848

    Advocacy and Resource Mobilization for the 2010 Round of Censuses, New York, 24-25 February 2005.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]; United Nations. Statistics Division

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2005. [221] p.

    The United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) in collaboration with the United Nations Statistics Division (UNSD), organized an international meeting on "Advocacy and Resource Mobilization towards the Successful Implementation of the 2010 Round (2005-2014) of Population and Housing Censuses in Developing Countries" in New York on 24 and 25 February 2005. The meeting was attended by 64 participants from various United Nations agencies and affiliates, national statistics/census offices, bilateral donors, non-governmental organizations, and academic and technical organizations. The meeting also included representatives from developing country governmental policy-making and funding organizations. The meeting focused on: 1) a review of the problem areas experienced in the 2000 Round of Censuses, including the serious under-utilization and poor dissemination of census results at the national and sub-national levels; 2) a description of the 2010 World Programme on Population and Housing Censuses; 3) a discussion of proposed strategies for the successful implementation of the 2010 Round of Censuses; and 4) the development of an advocacy and resource mobilization plan for the 2010 Round, which identifies the resources needed to ensure successful implementation of the 2010 Round and emphasizes the value of censuses in measuring progress towards the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). (excerpt)
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  20. 20
    295846

    Intensifying HIV prevention: UNAIDS policy position paper.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2005 Aug. 35 p. (UNAIDS/05.18E)

    The primary goal of this paper is to energize and mobilize an intensification of HIV prevention with an ultimate aim of universal access to HIV prevention and treatment. The paper defines the central actions that must be taken to arrest the spread of new HIV infections and to turn the tide against AIDS. It identifies what needs to be done to speedily and effectively bridge the HIV prevention gap, building on synergies between HIV prevention and care, and to ensure the sustainability of HIV treatment scale-up in the present context. It highlights the role of UNAIDS in relation to intensifying HIV prevention and points to ways in which jointly supportive action can be achieved. This paper is directed towards all those who have a leadership role in HIV prevention, treatment and care. Its foundations lie in the Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS endorsed by all member states of the United Nations in June 2001 and the Global Strategy Framework on HIV/AIDS endorsed by the 10th meeting of the UNAIDS Programme Coordinating Board in Rio de Janeiro in December 2000. The paper also builds upon commitments expressed in the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) Programme of Action and the Beijing Platform for Action, together with their follow-up reviews. It highlights significant opportunities for a strengthening of HIV prevention in the context of antiretroviral programmes such as the "3 by 5" Initiative to expand HIV antiretroviral treatment in developing countries. (excerpt)
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  21. 21
    292236

    AIDS Medicines and Diagnostics Service (AMDS).

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of HIV / AIDS / AMDS

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2005. [2] p.

    AIDS Medicines and Diagnostics Service is a network that aims to increase access to good quality and effective treatments for HIV/AIDS by improving supply of antiretroviral medicines and diagnostics in developing countries. Goals: To ensure that the supply of quality commodities is never an obstacle to expanding treatment, care and support; To use improved commodity supply to catalyze rapid expansion of treatment, to promote equity, and to support prevention. (excerpt)
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  22. 22
    278314

    The Planned Parenthood Association of Thailand: prevention of domestic violence against women and children in Thailand through the promotion of reproductive health.

    Pekanan N; Wongsurawat K

    Innovations: Innovative Approaches to Population Programme Management. 2001; 9:73-100.

    Thailand is the third largest country among the Southeast Asian nations with an area of approximately 513,000 square kilometres. It has a total population of about 62 million with 95 percent of the population embracing Buddhism. Known for having a soft-spoken society rich in culture and high in spirituality, the general assumption is that domestic violence is rare. Yet such a state of security does not exist regardless of the culture that one belongs to. On many occasions domestic violence not only involves women, but children usually suffer the consequences as well. It is not unusual that such acts of violence are considered a family affair and thus many cases go unreported or unpublicised, perhaps out of the victims’ fear or simply from ignorance of their rights. The Thai government has come a long way in countering the prevalence of domestic violence through on-going efforts to amend its legal system and constitution. Demonstrating commitment to protect women and children from discrimination and violence, it has acknowledged various international treaties and even incorporated the rights and welfare of women and children in its National Plan framework. (excerpt)
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  23. 23
    275763

    UNAIDS at country level: progress report 2003.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]. Country and Regional Support Department

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2004 Jun. [224] p. (UNAIDS/04.35E)

    This progress report summarizes the achievements of CRD (Country and Regional Support Department) in 2003 and presents selected highlights in greater detail. The first section outlines the strategic framework for action, Directions for the Future, the status of its implementation, the associated capacity strengthening of UNAIDS at country level, and challenges for 2004 and the next biennium. Text boxes in this section highlight “UNAIDS corporate tools” employed to implement the strategic framework. The second section reviews CRD’s efforts to translate global initiatives into results at country level. UNAIDS is involved in numerous global initiatives, three, which required particular involvement of UNAIDS resources at country level, are highlighted here. The third section reviews regional progress towards implementing the strategic framework for action. The examples cited, whilst not being an exhaustive review of country work, illustrate how UNAIDS has worked as a catalyst for national AIDS response. This report concludes with a collection of two-page country situation and progress summaries from 70 of the 134 countries with the UN Theme Groups on HIV/AIDS. (excerpt)
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  24. 24
    184748

    Results: HIV / AIDS.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]

    New York, New York, UNDP, 2002. 17 p.

    This document gives an overview of the United Nations Development Programme’s current activities in the area of HIV/AIDS. It focuses on results achieved in supporting countries in their efforts to effectively respond to the complex challenge of reversing the spread of the epidemic. (author's)
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