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Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    375980

    The World Health Organization Code and exclusive breastfeeding in China, India, and Vietnam.

    Robinson H; Buccini G; Curry L; Perez-Escamilla R

    Maternal and Child Health. 2018 Sep 8; [11] p.

    Promoting exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) is a highly feasible and cost-effective means of improving child health. Regulating the marketing of breastmilk substitutes is critical to protecting EBF. In 1981, the World Health Assembly adopted the World Health Organization International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes (the Code), prohibiting the unethical advertising and promotion of breastmilk substitutes. This comparative study aimed to (a) explore the relationships among Code enforcement and legislation, infant formula sales, and EBF in India, Vietnam, and China; (b) identify best practices for Code operationalization; and (c) identify pathways by which Code implementation may influence EBF. We conducted secondary descriptive analysis of available national-level data and seven high level key informant interviews. Findings indicate that the implementation of the Code is a necessary but insufficient step alone to improve breastfeeding outcomes. Other enabling factors, such as adequate maternity leave, training on breastfeeding for health professionals, health systems strengthening through the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative, and breastfeeding counselling for mothers, are needed. Several infant formula industry strategies with strong conflict of interest were identified as harmful to EBF. Transitioning breastfeeding programmes from donor-led to government-owned is essential for long-term sustainability of Code implementation and enforcement. We conclude that the relationships among the Code, infant formula sales, and EBF in India, Vietnam, and China are dependent on countries' engagement with implementation strategies and the presence of other enabling factors.
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  2. 2
    371186
    Peer Reviewed

    The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative: foundation stone in ensuring exclusive breastfeeding.

    Shrivastava SR; Shrivastava PS; Ramasamy J

    South African Family Practice. 2014 Jul-Aug; 56(4):250-251.

    Globally, breastfeeding has been acknowledged as one of the most effective ways of ensuring the adequate health, development and survival of a child. In 1991, in order to ensure the right start for every infant and to extend the desired support to the postnatal mothers to execute successful breastfeeding, the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) implemented the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI). Irrespective of the multiple advantages of baby-friendly hospitals, none of the evaluation studies have identified completely adherent facilities to the 10 steps. To ensure successful implementation and long-term sustainability of the BFHI in different healthcare facilities, different measures have been proposed. To conclude, despite the availability of a definitive evidence of BFHI having a successful impact on different breastfeeding outcomes, only a comprehensive and multisectoral approach can enable every mother and family to give every child the best start in life.
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  3. 3
    336019
    Peer Reviewed

    Barriers to implementing WHO's exclusive breastfeeding policy for women living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa: an exploration of ideas, interests and institutions.

    Eamer GG; Randall GE

    International Journal of Health Planning and Management. 2013 Jul-Sep; 28(3):257-68.

    The vertical transmission of HIV occurs when an HIV-positive woman passes the virus to her baby during pregnancy, delivery or breastfeeding. The World Health Organization's (WHO) Guidelines on HIV and infant feeding 2010 recommends exclusive breastfeeding for HIV-positive mothers in resource-limited settings. Although evidence shows that following this strategy will dramatically reduce vertical transmission of HIV, full implementation of the WHO Guidelines has been severely limited in sub-Saharan Africa. This paper provides an analysis of the role of ideas, interests and institutions in establishing barriers to the effective implementation of these guidelines by reviewing efforts to implement prevention of vertical transmission programs in various sub-Saharan countries. Findings suggest that WHO Guidelines on preventing vertical transmission of HIV through exclusive breastfeeding in resource-limited settings are not being translated into action by governments and front-line workers because of a variety of structural and ideological barriers. Identifying and understanding the role played by ideas, interests and institutions is essential to overcoming barriers to guideline implementation. Copyright (c) 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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  4. 4
    332640

    Postpartum Family Planning: Sharing Experiences, Lessons Learned and Tools for Programming -- Meeting report, 12 May 2009, Washington, D.C.

    Postpartum Family Planning: Sharing Experiences, Lessons Learned and Tools for Programming Meeting (2009: Washington, D.C.)

    Baltimore, Maryland, Jhpiego, ACCESS, Family Planning Initiative [ACCESS-FP], 2009. [6] p.

    On May 12, 2009, more than 76 experts and leaders in reproductive health (RH) and maternal, neonatal and child health (MNCH) from more than 22 global health organizations and programs convened in Washington, D.C., for the “Postpartum Family Planning: Sharing Experiences, Lessons Learned and Tools for Programming” meeting. The meeting had three objectives: 1. Present and discuss experiences and lessons learned in implementing PPFP in a variety of settings; 2. Share tools and other resources to support PPFP programming; and 3. Discuss progress, continuing priorities for research and advancing MNCH / FP integration. (Excerpts)
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  5. 5
    289974
    Peer Reviewed

    The National Breastfeeding Policy in Nigeria: the working mother and the law.

    Worugji IN; Etuk SJ

    Health Care for Women International. 2005 Aug; 26(7):534-554.

    In this article, we examine the National Breastfeeding Policy in Nigeria, the extent to which the law guarantees and protects the maternity rights of the working mother, and the interplay between the law and the National Breastfeeding Policy. Our aim is to make people aware of this interplay to lead to some positive efforts to sanitize the workplace and shield women from some of the practices against them in employment relations in Nigeria as well as encourage exclusive breastfeeding by employed mothers. We conclude that the provisions of the law in this regard are not in accord with the contemporary international standards for the protection of pregnancy and maternity. It does not guarantee and protect the freedom of the nursing mother to exclusively breastfeed the child for at least the 6 months as propagated by Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) and the National Breastfeeding Policy. Moreover, there is no enabling law to back up the National Policy Initiative as it affects employer and employee relations. We, therefore, suggest a legal framework for effective implementation of the National Breastfeeding Policy for women in dependent labour relations. It is hoped that such laws will not only limit some of the practices against women in employment but also will encourage and promote exclusive breastfeeding behaviour by employed mothers. (author's)
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