Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    392587
    Peer Reviewed

    Effect of exclusive breastfeeding on selected adverse health and nutritional outcomes: a nationally representative study.

    Khan MN; Islam MM

    BMC Public Health. 2017 Nov 21; 17(1):889.

    BACKGROUND: Despite growing evidence in support of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) among infants in the first 6 months of birth, the debate over the optimal duration of EBF continues. This study examines the effect of termination of EBF during the first 2, 4 and 6 months of birth on a set of adverse health and nutritional outcomes of infants. METHODS: Three waves of Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey data were analysed using multivariate regression. The adverse health outcomes were: an episode of diarrhea, fever or acute respiratory infection (ARI) during the 2 weeks prior to the survey. Nutritional outcomes were assessed by stunting (height-for-age), wasting (weight-for-height) and underweight (weight-for-age). Population attributable fraction was calculated to estimate percentages of these six outcomes that could have been prevented by supplying EBF. RESULTS: Fifty-six percent of infants were exclusively breastfed during the first 6 months. Lack of EBF increased the odds of diarrhea, fever and ARI. Among the babies aged 6 months or less 27.37% of diarrhea, 13.24% of fever and 8.94% of ARI could have been prevented if EBF was not discontinued. If EBF was terminated during 0-2 months, 2-4 months the odds of becoming underweight were 2.16 and 2.01 times higher, respectively, than babies for whom EBF was not terminated. CONCLUSION: Children who are not offered EBF up to 6 months of their birth may suffer from a range of infectious diseases and under-nutrition. Health promotion and other public health interventions should be enhanced to encourage EBF at least up to six-month of birth. TRAIL REGISTRATION: Data of this study were collected following the guidelines of ICF International and Bangladesh Medical Research Council. The registration number of data collection is 132,989.0.000 and the data-request was registered on September 11, 2016.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    374074

    One is too many: ending child deaths from pneumonia and diarrhoea.

    Amouzou A; Velez LC; Tarekegn H; Young M

    2016 Nov; New York, New York, UNICEF, 2016 Nov. 77 p.

    Pneumonia and diarrhoea are responsible for the unnecessary loss of 1.4 million children each year. This report highlights current pneumonia and diarrhoea related mortality, and illustrates the startling divide between the children being reached and the considerable number of those left behind. By developing key protective, preventative and treatment interventions, collectively we are now equipped with the knowledge and the tools required to preventing child deaths due to these leading childhood killers. The report also provides recommendations to further accelerate progress in effective interventions and bridge the greatest gaps in equity.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    331941

    Diarrhoea: Why children are still dying and what can be done.

    Johansson EW; Wardlaw T; Binkin N; Brocklehurst C; Dooley T

    New York, New York, UNICEF, 2009. [65] p.

    This report sets out a 7-point strategy for comprehensive diarrhoea control that includes a treatment package to reduce child deaths, and a prevention package to reduce the number of diarrhoea cases for years to come. The report looks at treatment options such as low-osmolarity ORS and zinc tablets, as well as prevention measures such as the promotion of breastfeeding, vitamin A supplementation, immunization against rotavirus -- a leading cause of diarrhoea -- and proven methods of improving water, sanitation and hygiene practices. Diarrhoea's status as the second leading killer of children under five is an alarming reminder of the exceptional vulnerability of children in developing countries. Saving the lives of millions of children at risk of death from diarrhoea is possible with a comprehensive strategy that ensures all children in need receive critical prevention and treatment measures. (Excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    293307

    Technical updates of the guidelines on Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI): evidence and recommendations for further adaptations.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2005. [44] p.

    It is over seven years since IMCI has been introduced and much has been learnt through the adaptation and implementation processes in countries. The Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development (CAH) and other institutions have undertaken work to evaluate the evidence base for the technical guidelines of the IMCI strategy. Research results are emerging with potential implications for updating the technical guidelines of IMCI. In 2001 CAH, jointly with Roll Back Malaria, organized a technical consultation to examine the evidence base for the IMCI strategy for the management of malaria and other febrile illnesses including measles and dengue haemorrhagic disease. This international consultation came up with recommendations to improve the guidelines, as well as specific recommendations for operational research. Following the technical consultation, CAH held a series of meetings within the Department at HQ in addition to consultations with regional office staff where the updating process was discussed. In 2004 it was recommended that CAH finalize the IMCI updates on the basis of the best available evidence and country programme feedback, prioritizing those updates most likely to reduce child mortality. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.