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  1. 1
    337933

    WHO recommendations on postnatal care of the mother and newborn. 2013.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2013 Oct. [72] p.

    The postnatal period is a critical phase in the lives of mothers and newborn babies. Most maternal and infant deaths occur during this time. Yet, this is the most neglected period for the provision of quality care. WHO guidelines on postnatal care have been recently updated based on all available evidence. The guidelines focus on postnatal care of mothers and newborns in resource-limited settings in low- and middle-income countries. The guidelines address timing, number and place of postnatal contacts, and content of postnatal care for all mothers and babies during the six weeks after birth. The primary audience for these guidelines is health professionals who are responsible for providing postnatal care to women and newborns, primarily in areas where resources are limited. The guidelines are also expected to be used by policy-makers and managers of maternal and child health programmes, health facilities, and teaching institutions to set up and maintain maternity and newborn care services. The information in these guidelines is expected to be included in job aids and tools for both pre- and in-service training of health professionals to improve their knowledge, skills and performance in postnatal care. These recommendations will be regularly updated as more evidence is collated and analysed on a continuous basis, with major reviews and updates at least every five years. The next major update will be considered in 2018 under the oversight of the WHO Guidelines Review Committee.
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  2. 2
    337932

    Postnatal care for mothers and newborns: Highlights from the World Health Organization 2013 guidelines.

    Maternal and Child Survival Program; World Health Organization [WHO]

    [Geneva, Switzerland], World Health Organization [WHO], 2015 Apr. [8] p. (WHO/RHR/15.05; USAID Leader with Associates Cooperative Agreement No. GHS-A-00-08-00002-00; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. AID-OAA-A-14-00028)

    This evidence brief provides highlights and key messages from World Health Organization’s 2013 Guidelines on Postnatal Care for Mothers and Newborns. These updated guidelines address the timing and content of postnatal care for mothers with a special focus on resource-limited settings in low- and middle-income countries. This brief is intended for policy-makers, programme managers, educators and providers who care for women and newborns after birth.
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  3. 3
    316468

    Focus on ... Breastfeeding decisions for women with HIV. A digest of key resources.

    Setty V

    Baltimore, Maryland, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, Information and Knowledge for Optimal Health [INFO], 2007 Apr. [12] p. (INFO Reports No. 12)

    This issue of Focus On... is intended to help health care practitioners better understand the current state of knowledge on breastfeeding and HIV transmission. It examines the most recent studies and expert guidance on the topic and provides the key points from recent research trials, literature reviews, and program evaluation studies. For women with HIV, infant feeding decisions are shaped by their access to infant feeding counseling and antiretroviral treatment, on the social stigma surrounding people with HIV, exclusive breastfeeding, and exclusive replacement feeding, on access to clean and safe water and food supplements, and on partner and family support. A woman infected with HIV can pass HIV on to her infant during pregnancy, at the time of labor and delivery, and through breastfeeding. Without treatment, between 15% and 30% of infants born to mothers with HIV become infected with HIV during pregnancy, labor, and delivery. An additional 10% to 20% become infected during breastfeeding depending on how long the infant is breastfed. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    314857
    Peer Reviewed

    Differences between international recommendations on breastfeeding in the presence of HIV and the attitudes and counselling messages of health workers in Lilongwe, Malawi.

    Piwoz EG; Ferguson YO; Bentley ME; Corneli AL; Moses A

    International Breastfeeding Journal. 2006 Mar 9; 1(1):2.

    To prevent postnatal transmission of HIV in settings where safe alternatives to breastfeeding are unavailable, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends exclusive breastfeeding followed by early, rapid cessation of breastfeeding. Only limited data are available on the attitudes of health workers toward this recommendation and the impact of these attitudes on infant feeding counselling messages given to mothers. As part of the Breastfeeding, Antiretroviral, and Nutrition (BAN) clinical trial, we carried out an in-depth qualitative study of the attitudes, beliefs, and counselling messages of 19 health workers in Lilongwe, Malawi. Although none of the workers had received formal training, several reported having counseled HIV-positive mothers about infant feeding. Health workers with counselling experience believed that HIV-infected mothers should breastfeed exclusively, rather than infant formula feed, citing poverty as the primary reason. Because of high levels of malnutrition, all the workershad concerns about early cessation of breastfeeding. Important differences were observed between the WHO recommendations and the attitudes and practices of the health workers. Understanding these differences is important for designing effective interventions. (author's)
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