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Your search found 3 Results

  1. 1
    782141

    Steroid contraception and the risk of neoplasia.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Scientific Group

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 1978. (World Health Organization Technical Report Series No. 619) 54 p

    Studies on steroid contraception (SC) and risk of neoplasia are reviewed. Methodological issues in neoplasia etiology studies include: 1) possibility of a latent period between exposure to cause and disease development; 2) cumulative effects of prolonged or repeated SC exposure; 3) discontinued drugs or dosage schedules; 4) time of exposure (adolescence or prenatal, e.g.); 5) isolation of specific causes among multiple risks; and 6) variations in neoplasma diagnoses. The 4 epidemiological approaches to SC-associated neoplasia studies have inherent shortcomings, but cohorts yield significant associations. Relative risk (ratio of disease incidence among exposed vs. nonexposed persons) is an index of association only, not evidence of cause and effect. Benign breast neoplasia risk was reduced by current SC use of >2 years, and weak evidence points to a residual protective effect, apparently associated with progestogen dose. Aggregated breast cancer data show no clear adverse or beneficial effect of SC use; however, evidence suggests SCs may increase breast cancer risk in population subgroups (e.g., young women). Only short-term evidence is available; hence, no inference of long-term SC breast cancer effects is possible. No beneficial effect of SCs on uterine fibroids is evident, but sequential SCs, no longer marketed, may have increased risk to endometrial carcinoma. Inconclusive data suggest SCs may decrease ovarian cancer risk. Increased risk of cervical dysplasia and carcinoma in situ is associated with SC use, especially long-term use by women with predisposing factors. Risk of hepatocellular adenoma of the liver increases with prolonged SC exposure, especially high dose. Relevance of existing data from more developed countries to disease risk in less developed ones is discussed, and recommendations made.
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  2. 2
    796367
    Peer Reviewed

    [Oral contraceptives and the risk of cancer (author's transl)] P-piller och cancerrisk.

    Gustafsson JA; Hagenfeldt K

    LAKARTIDNINGEN. 1979 Apr 25; 76(17):1625-7.

    An overview of the risk of developing cancer related to oral contraceptive (o.c.) use is presented. A committee of experts affiliated with WHO studied the problem of developing cancer related to o.c. use. O.c. use for more than 2 years prevents the formation of benign breast tumors, even after discontinuing o.c. use. The effect is due to the progestin component. There is no clear indication that o.c. use increases the risk of breast cancer. A higher risk of endometrial cancer is associated with sequential preparation use, but not with the use of combination preparations. Cervical neoplasms and pituitary adenoma may be more frequent among predisposed women who use o.c.s. Studies show a reduced risk of ovarian cancer with o.c. use, but more studies are necessary. There is a marked increase in the relative risk of developing hepatocellular adenoma among women who use o.c.s for longer than 3 years. The risk increases with the hormone dosage, the duration of treatment, and the age of the patient. There is no reliable data to indicate that the risk of malignant melanoma increases with o.c. use. More study is needed to determine the possible cancer risks of injection preparations. Combination preparations can cause an increased risk of vaginal epithelial metaplasia. Diethylstilbestrol taken during early pregnancy can cause vaginal neoplasms in the offspring. More epidemiological studies and clinical and laboratory studies on the carcinogenic effects of o.c.s and the endocrinological effects of o.c.s on younger women should be undertaken. It is recommended that o.c.s with the lowest possible hormone dosages be used. O.c.s should not be prescribed to women with vaginal adenosis. (Summary in ENG)
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  3. 3
    700024
    Peer Reviewed

    An assessment of the hazards and metabolic alterations attributed to oral contraceptives.

    Goldzieher JW

    Contraception. 1970 Jun; 1(6):409-445.

    This article reviews the validity of previously published material linking oral contraceptive usage to health hazards. The statistical methods involved in such studies are thoroughly examined, particularly those studies relating oral contraceptive usage to thromboembolic disease incidence. Problems inherent to the basic designs of such studies are discussed. Some relationship between thromembolic disease and oral contraceptive usage has been established. Studies on animals relating oral contraceptive usage with carcinogenesis are inconclusive due to the different metabolic rates obtained for different animals and different strains and the high dosage used to produce tumors. Review of the data relating oral contraceptives with alterations in carbohydrate metabolism, serum lipids, etc., show pure speculation of conclusion. Endrocrine effects persisting after discontinuation of oral contraceptives were rare; apparently both types of steroids play some part. It was suggested that most data on this subject is faulty and filled with fixed opinions which should be avoided.
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