Your search found 8 Results

  1. 1
    329180

    Reproductive health surveillance in the US-Mexico border region: beyond the border (and into the future) [editorial]

    Kotelchuck M

    Preventing Chronic Disease. 2008 Oct; 5(4):A109.

    This editorial examines reproductive health surveillance in the US- Mexico border region. It offers improvements for reproductive health data system methods and recommendations for sustainability of the project. It also proposes revisions to the Brownsville-Matamoros Sister City Project for Women’s Health (BMSCP) in the following areas: maternal birthing experiences, women’s health over the life course, migration history, acculturation/cultural identity/border region identity, Latina reproductive health, and MCH policy relevance.
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  2. 2
    329179

    The past, present, and future of reproductive health surveillance in the US-Mexico border region [editorial]

    McDonald JA

    Preventing Chronic Disease. 2008 Oct; 5(4):A110.

    This editorial discusses reproductive health surveillance in the US- Mexico border region. It touches on past, present and future projects for that area including the United States- Mexico Border Health Commission (USMBHC) and the Brownsville-Matamoros Sister City Project for Women’s Health (BMSCP).
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  3. 3
    329205

    Continuum of care for HIV patients returning to Mexico [letter]

    Donohoe T; Reyes M; Armas L; Mandel N

    Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. 2008 Sep-Oct; 19(5):335-7.

    The U.S.-Mexico Border region, which includes some of the poorest counties in the country, has large rural populations with health care service shortages leading to poorer health outcomes than in the rest of the country (United States-Mexico Border Health Commission, 2008). In combination with these factors, an increase in the number of HIV cases along the border led to a request from the Health Resources and Services Administration for a collaborative effort to systematically assess the education and capacity building needs of health care providers in this region. The three AETCs geographically located along the border (Pacific AETC [California, Arizona], Mountain- Plains AETC [New Mexico], and Texas/Oklahoma AETC [Texas]) interviewed more than 75 border clinicians to determine their unique HIV-related education needs. Four broad training-related needs emerged: (a) to increase integration and coordination of HIV training activities, (b) to expand HIV training beyond AETC-targeted providers, (c) to offer site-based trainings that include cultural sensitivity themes and incentives for participation, and (d) to maintain a binational perspective by including Mexican clinicians in training activities. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    323244
    Peer Reviewed

    Migrants as transnational development agents: An inquiry into the newest round of the migration - development nexus.

    Faist T

    Population, Space and Place. 2008; 14(1):21-42.

    Migrant networks and organisations have emerged as development agents. They interact with state institutions in flows of financial remittances, knowledge, and political ideas. In the discursive dimension, the new enthusiasm on the part of OECD states and international organisations, such as the World Bank, for migrant remittances, migrant associations and their role in development, is a sign of two trends which have coincided. Firstly, community as a principle of development has come to supplement principles of social order such as the market and the state. Secondly, in the current round of the migration-development nexus, migrants in general and transnational collective actors in particular have been constituted by states and international organisations as a significant agent. In the institutional dimension, agents such as hometown associations, networks of businesspersons, epistemic networks and political diasporas have emerged as collective actors. These formations are not unitary actors, and they are frequently in conflict with states and communities of origin. The analysis concludes with reflections of how national states structure the transnational spaces in which non-state actors are engaged in cross-border flows, leading towards a tight linkage between migration control, immigrant incorporation and development cooperation. (author's)
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  5. 5
    320366

    European Union. Managing migration means potential EU complicity in neighboring states' abuse of migrants and refugees.

    Human Rights Watch

    New York, New York, Human Rights Watch, 2006 Oct. 22 p. (Human Rights Watch No. 2)

    Irregular migration into the European Union (EU) poses clear challenges for European governments. Few would question the urgent need for policies to address these challenges. However, the common EU policy in this area is primarily focussed on keeping migrants and asylum seekers out of and away from Europe. The rights of migrants and refugee protection are marginalized. This briefing paper summarizes recent trends in the EU's approach. Through case studies of conditions in, and EU policies toward, Ukraine and Libya, it critiques current EU "externalization" practices. After noting some hopeful signs toward enhanced protection for asylum seekers and migrants, it concludes with recommendations to the EU and its member states. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    314977

    Migrant children's rights: Working to fill the gap.

    Musiani F

    UN Chronicle. 2006; [3] p..

    The Movement of people across national borders is a phenomenon increasingly relevant to global public policy. Yet, although international migration affects millions of people all over the world and has crucial repercussions on the balances in and between States, deep analyses and adequate discussions of migration-related issues are often pushed to the side of political debates. In many cases, States have found themselves unable to deal with sudden changes or developments in the field of migration. The need for a global response ends up being handled at either the national or local level and in a closed manner, as the issue is often considered "too political" to be dealt with at the international level. As a result, immigration policies are often considered just a matter of elaborated legal mechanisms that exclude illegal and unauthorized migrants from national territories. A coordinated policy framework dealing with the rights of people moving across borders, supported by an international migration institution able to take and implement effective decisions, is therefore of utmost importance. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    309110

    Malaria epidemiology and control in refugee camps and complex emergencies.

    Rowland M; Nosten F

    Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology. 2001 Dec; 95(8):741-754.

    Owing to the breakdown of health systems, mass population displacements, and resettlement of vulnerable refugees in camps or locations prone to vector breeding, malaria is often a major health problem during war and the aftermath of war. During the initial acute phase of the emergency, before health services become properly established, mortality rates may rise to alarming levels. Establishing good case management and effective malaria prevention are important priorities for international agencies responsible for emergency health services. The operational strategies and control methods used in peacetime must be adapted to emergency conditions, and should be regularly re-assessed as social, political and epidemiological conditions evolve. During the last decade, research on malaria in refugee camps on the Pakistan± Afghanistan and Thailand± Burma borders has led to new methods and strategies for malaria prevention and case management, and these are now being taken up by international health agencies. This experience has shown that integration of research within control programmes is an efficient and dynamic mode of working that can lead to innovation and hopefully sustainable malaria control. United Nations' humanitarian and non-governmental agencies can play a significant part in resolving the outstanding research issues in malaria control. (author's)
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  8. 8
    182221
    Peer Reviewed

    African countries to cooperate on epidemic control. Experts hope that sharing expertise and resources will help control disease outbreaks in the region.

    Wendo C

    Lancet. 2003 Jul 19; 362(9379):222.

    Six countries of the Africa Great Lakes sub-region have signed an agreement to cooperate on the prevention and control of epidemics and diseases that can be prevented by vaccination. Their health ministers signed the protocol of cooperation in the Ugandan capital, Kampala, on June 27. According to a 14-page document the six ministers released jointly, the countries would share epidemic information across borders, harmonise treatment policies and protocols, and standardise laboratory procedures and techniques. They also agreed to coordinate mass vaccination activities, implement joint activities aimed at eliminating measles, vitamin A deficiencies, and maternal and neonatal tetanus. c(excerpt)
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