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  1. 1
    277663

    [The practice guideline 'Hormonal contraception' (second revision) from the Dutch College of General Practitioners; a response from the perspective of obstetrics and gynecology] De standaard 'Hormonale anticonceptie' (tweede herziening) van het Nederlands Huisartsen Genootschap; reactie vanuit de verloskunde-gynaecologie.

    Knuist M; Hamerlynck JV

    Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Geneeskunde. 2004 Jun 26; 148(26):1274-1275.

    The Dutch College of General Practitioners' (NHG) guideline on hormonal contraception does not follow the WHO criteria for the use of oral contraceptives in contrast to the guideline of the Dutch Society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Contrary to the WHO criteria, the NHG guideline considers a blood-pressure measurement before starting with an oral contraceptive to be unnecessary. It also considers no form of migraine to be contraindication for oral contraceptives. The NHG guideline further disclaims the (slightly) increased risk of developing breast cancer in women using oral contraceptives. It advises initiation of oral-contraceptive use two weeks postpartum in non-breast-feeding women and six weeks postpartum in breastfeeding women, instead of the three weeks and six months, respectively, indicated in the WHO guideline. Lastly, the NHG guideline is too optimistic as to the reliability of oral-contraceptive use, as no distinction is made between efficacy and effectiveness. Such discrepancies between two Dutch guidelines can be detrimental to women's health care. The WHO criteria for contraceptive use may be a valuable tool to overcome differences of opinion to as to achieve a badly needed full consensus. (author's)
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  2. 2
    776173

    Combined oral contraceptives.

    BRIGGS MH

    In: Diczfalusy, E., ed. Regulation of human fertility. (Proceedings of the WHO Symposium on Advances in Fertility Regulation, Moscow, USSR, November 16-19, 1976) Copenhagen, Denmark, Scriptor, 1977. p. 253-282

    This review of combined oral contraceptive (OC) preparations presents formulations, pregnancy rates, biochemical parameter changes, morbidity, and OC indications in 15 tables. The OC preparations are based on 2 different estrogens and 14 progestagens. Though steroid content differs among products, all act primarily to inhibit ovulation by suppression of midcycle release of pituitary gonadotropins. Variable-dose products are associated with higher pregnancy rates than fixed-dose preparations. Side effects of OCs, while difficult to identify, fall into 2 categories: 1) common adverse associations similar to responses to inert placeboes; and 2) serious biochemical and physiological alterations. There is no evidence of any increase in morbidity due to OC use, whereas avoidance of risks associated with pregnancy is beneficial. No convincing evidence of carcinogenic hazard is presented. Some evidence of reduced systemic side effects by lower-dose products is presented, though gynecological side effects, such as irregular bleeding, may increase. Drug interaction with OCs is described; rifampicin causes the most serious of these. OCs induce wide-ranging metabolic changes in many organ systems. These may relate to undesirable side effects (psychological or neurological signs, skin disorders, and blood pressure changes).
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