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  1. 1
    081945

    Conservation of West and Central African rainforests. Conservation de la foret dense en Afrique centrale et de l'Ouest.

    Cleaver K; Munasinghe M; Dyson M; Egli N; Peuker A; Wencelius F

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 1992. xi, 353 p. (World Bank Environment Paper No. 1)

    This World Bank publication is a collection of selected papers presented at the Conference on Conservation of West and Central African Rainforests in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, in November 1990. These rainforests are very important to the stability of the regional and global environment, yet human activity is destroying them at a rate of 2 million hectares/year. Causes of forest destruction are commercial logging for export, conversion of forests into farmland, cutting of forests for fuelwood, and open-access land tenure systems. Other than an introduction and conclusion, this document is divided into 8 broad topics: country strategies, agricultural nexus, natural forestry management, biodiversity and conservation, forest peoples and products, economic values, fiscal issues, and institutional and private participation issues. Countries addressed in the country strategies section include Zaire, Cameroon, Sao Tome and Principe, and Nigeria. The forest peoples and products section has the most papers: wood products and residual from forestry operations in the Congo; Kutafuta Maisha: searching for life on Zaire's Ituri forest frontier; development in the Central African rainforest: concern for forest peoples; concern for Africa's forest peoples: a touchstone of a sustainable development policy; Tropical Forestry Action Plans and indigenous people: the case of Cameroon; forest people and people in the forest: investing in local community development; and women and the forest: use and conservation of forestry resources other than wood. Topics in the economic values section range from debt-for-nature swaps to environmental labeling. Forestry taxation and forest revenue systems are discussed under fiscal issues. The conclusion discusses saving Africa's rainforests.
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  2. 2
    082305

    Jessica Tuchman Mathews: the case for reinventing technology to promote sustainable development.

    Lerner SD

    In: Earth summit. Conversations with architects of an ecologically sustainable future, by Steve Lerner. Bolinas, California, Commonweal, 1991. 25-38.

    The public debate on the environment leading to the 1992 Earth Summit in Brazil has been restricted to global climate change instead of global change. The Summit should be part of an ongoing process and not a framework convention followed by protocols. Separate conventions for biodiversity and deforestation are likely to emerge, even though one convention integrating both biodiversity and deforestation is needed. Many environmental and development issues overlap, suggesting a need for an international group to coordinate these issues. Negotiating separate conventions for the various issues is costly for developing countries. Rapid population growth contributes to environmental degradation, but no coordinated effort exists to reduce it. The US continues to not support the UN Population Fund which, along with threats of US boycotts and disapproval, curbs initiatives to reduce population. At present population and economic growth rates, an environmental disaster will likely happen in the early 2000s. Developing countries, which also contribute greatly to global warming, will not take actions if industrialized nations do not initiate reductions of greenhouse gases. Developed countries emit the most greenhouse gases, have been responsible for most past emissions, and have the means to initiate reductions. Of industrialized nations, the US stands alone in setting targets to reduce carbon dioxide. Unlike some European nations, the US does not have an energy policy. The US abandoned public transportation for the automobile while Europe has a strong public transportation system. The World Bank has improved greatly in addressing global environmental issues, but only 1% of its energy lending is for energy efficiency. The Bank knows that projects implemented by nongovernmental organizations are more successful than those implemented by governments, yet it continues to lend money to governments. Humans need to redesign existing linear systems to be like nature's circular systems in which by-products are starting products for another reaction.
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  3. 3
    205134

    The World Bank Population, Health and Nutrition Department, Policy and Research Division fiscal year 1986-1988 work program.

    World Bank. Population, Health and Nutrition Department

    [Unpublished] [1986]. iii, 9, 5 p.

    This note presents the work program of the Policy and Research Division of the World Bank Population, Health, and Nutrition Department for the fiscal years 1988. Although this note was prepared mainly for internal review purposes in the department and in the Bank, it has been circulated outside the Bank to increase awareness of the department policy and research activities. This note 1) lists department staff, 2) gives a brief overview of the department's work, 3) relates the history of the department, and 4) describes the department's activities by objectives. The department's objectives comprise 1) population, 2) population in Sub-Saharan Africa, 3) health, 4) pharmaceuticals, 5) nutrition, 6) intersectoral links, and 7) poverty alleviation. The principal population activities include work on the role of the private sector in family planning, incentives for small family size, cost-effective approaches to the delivery of family planning services, and a population lending review. Work on population in Sub-Saharan Africa centers on adolescent fertility and spatial population distribution. The work program in health reviews health financing and the cost-effectiveness of alternative health interventions. Research on pharmaceuticals examines a range of potential policy interventions on the demand and supply side. A nutrition paper is being prepared on the cost-effectiveness of nutrition interventions, especially as part of primary health care. Intersectoral issues include the links between population, health, and nutrition on one hand and other sectors, such as agriculture and education on the other hand. Work on poverty alleviation examines the extent to which population, health, and nutrition projects should reach out to poor client groups. Research activities in each of these 7 areas are described. An annex lists recent staff papers on these subjects.
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