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  1. 1
    034419

    The United Nations Decade for Women: an end and a beginning.

    Who Chronicle. 1985; 39(5):163-70.

    The World Conference to appraise the achievements of the UN Decade for Women was held in Nairobi, Kenya during July 1985 and was attended by 6000 delegates. In preparation for the Nairobi conference, the Director General of the World Health Organization (WHO) issued a report analyzing the situation regarding women, health, and development and drawing attention to the special health needs of women as well as to the key roles that women play in promoting health and development. Accurate, adequate, and relevant information is essential if appropriate action is to be taken, and much of WHO's efforts during the Decade focused on collecting such information. According to the Director General's report, women's contribution to development is underestimated and their potential is grossly underestimated. Their health status also is conditioned by factors such as employment, education, and social status. Ultimately, women's participation in health and development may even depend on equitable access to economic resources and political power. Thus, the report stresses that it is imperative not to view the health aspects in isolation. The status society accords women is closely linked to their reproductive function. Yet, despite this vital function, girls are valued less than boys in many countries. Nowhere is the inequity in women's status more apparent than in their economic situation. A study on the training and utilization of traditional birth attendants was carried out in the Eastern Mediterranean Region, and 3 Member States were then assisted in launching national training programs. In the Eastern Mediterranean Region, WHO collaborated with countries in pilot projects for the early detection and treatment of cervical and breast cancer. Legislative and policy issues relative to the welfare of women also have been studied. Among the subjects coverd have been the protection of working mothers, measures governing the minimum legal age of marriage, and harmful traditional practices. The grassroots organizations are the primary focus of WHO's strategy for involving women's organizations in primary health care since they serve the poor and the powerless and their goal is usually to satisfy the immediate needs of their members. WHO has initiated a multinational study on women as providers of health care, in which 17 Member States have participated. The Joint WHO/UNICEF Nutrition Support Program, initiated in 1982, supports action to improve the nutritional status of women and children.
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  2. 2
    033882

    The Joint WHO/UNICEF Nutrition Support Programme.

    Gurney M

    World Health. 1985 Nov; 13-15.

    In November 1980, Dr. Halfdan Mahler, Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO), and James Grant, head of the UN Children's Fund (UNICEF), drafted a joint program to improve the nutritional status of children and women through developmental measures based on primary health care. The government of Italy agreed to fund in full the estimated cost of US$85.3 million. When a tripartite agreement was signed in Rome in April 1982, the WHO/UNICEF Joint Nutrition Support Program (JNSP) came into being. It was agreed that resources would be concentrated in a number of countries to develop both demonstrable and replicable ways to improve nutrition. Thus far, projects are underway or are just starting in 17 countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean. In most of these countries, infant and toddler mortality rates are considerably higher than the 3rd world averages. Program objectives include reducing infant and young child diseases and deaths and at the same time improving child health, growth, and development as well as maternal nutrition. These objectives require attention to be directed to the other causes of malnutrition as well as diet and food. JNSP includes nutrition and many other activities, such as control of diarrhea. The aim of all activities is better nutritional status leading to better health and growth and lower mortality. Feeding habits and family patterns differ from 1 country to another as do the JNSP country projects. Most JNSP projects adopt a multisectoral approach, incorporating varied activities that directly improve nutritional status. Activities involve agriculture and education as well as health but are only included if they can be expected to lead directly to improved nutrition. A multisectoral program calls for multisectoral management and involves coordination at all levels -- district, provincial, and national. This has been one of the most difficult things to get moving in many JNSP projects, yet it is one of the most important. Community participation is vital to all projects. Its success can only be judged as the projects unfold, but early experiences from several countries are encouraging.
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  3. 3
    033365

    United Nations Children's Fund: report of the Executive Board (15-26 April 1985).

    UNICEF. Executive Board

    New York, New York, United Nations, 1985. v, 58 p. (Economic and Social Council Official Records, 1985. Supplement No. 10; E/1985/31; E/ICEF/1985/12)

    The major decisions of the UN Children's Fund Executive Board in their 1985 session were to: approve several new program recommendations and endores a major emergency assistance program for several African countries; approve initiatives to accelerate the implementation of child survival and development actions, particularly towards the goal of achieving universal immunization of children against 6 major childhood diseases by 1990; adopt a comprehensive policy framework for UN International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF) programs concerning women; approve UNICEF revised budget estimates for 1984-85 and budget estimates for 1986-87; and make a number of decisions on ways to improve the administration and the role of the Board. The Board members both reported on and heard evidence of the encouraging results of recent efforts to implement national child survival and development programs. Reports of the successful immunization campaigns in Burkina Faso, Colombia, El Salvador, and Nigeria were welcomed, along with the news that half a million children were saved during the year through the use of oral rehydration therapy. Stronger efforts were encouraged to improve results in the areas of breastfeeding and growth monitoring. Implementation issues in connection with child survival and development actions were a continuing focus of Board attention during the session. The accelerated implementation of child survival and development actions was accorded the highest priority in approving the medium-term plan for 1984-88. The Board also adopted a resolution that sought to draw the attention of world leaders, during their observance of the 40th anniversary of the UN, to the importance of reaffirming their commitment to accelerate the implementation of the child survival and development resolution and realizing universal immunization by 1990. Delegations commended the results of the World Health Organization/UNICEF joint nutrition support program but noted that malnutrition among women and children appeared to be increasing. Water supply and sanitation activities were encouraged, and the Board stressed that those actions should be linked with health and hygiene education. The Board endorsed the report on recent UNICEF activities in Africa. Many delegations spoke in support of the increased aid to Africa. Major emphasis was given to linking emergency responses with ongoing UNICEF programs. The Board approved new multi-year commitments from general resources totalling $303,053,422 for 28 country and interregional programs and noted 32 projects totaling $223,215,000 to be funded from specific-purpose contributions. The Board stressed the importance of ensuring that child survival and development actions were integrated with continuing efforts in other of UNICEF action. The Board approved a commitment of $252,550,443 for the budget for the biennium 1986-87.
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  4. 4
    030537

    Statement.

    Grant JP

    In: The Tenth Asian Parasite Control/Family Planning Conference. Proceedings. Under the joint auspices of the Asian Parasite Control Organization, the Japanese Organization for International Cooperation in Family Planning, the Japan Association of Parasite Control and the International Planned Parenthood Federation. Tokyo, Asian Parasite Control Organization, [1983]. 63-70.

    Economic depression affects children in 3 major ways: disposable family incomes drop sharply, with the most severe consequences for poor people and their children; government budgets for social services, particularly those affecting young children and including nutrition, health, and education, are the first to be cut back; and national and international levels of development assistance stagnate as a consequence of the restrictive budgetary policies adopted by industrialized countries. Despite the first welcome signs of an economic recovery in some industrialized nations, most indications are that the worldwide recovery may be relatively shallow in the mid-1980s and that significant beneficial impacts on many low income countries and families will be long delayed. Thus, in the absence of special measures to accelerate health progress, millions more children and mothers are likely to die in the in low income areas than was thought likely at the beginning of the decade. Possibly the only hopeful sign is that the restrictions imposed by the world recession have stimulated the search for innovative and cost effective ways to protect and improve the health of children and mothers. Within a decade, low cost advances could be saving the lives of 20,000 children daily and preventing the crippling of another 20,000. What is in question is the priority of this kind of progress -- among governments, among international assistance sources and networks, and in developing countries. The strategy adopted by JOICFP in its Integrated Family Planning, Nutrition, and Parasite Control Projects offers one such way. The projects are based on the concept that family planning programs will be more acceptable if combined with related services, which the community readily perceives as beneficial and useful. What most contributes to making parasite control a good entry point is that the process of examination and the effects of treatment are immediately visible. Possibly more important that the biological and medical effects of parasite control is its effectiveness as a tool for community health and education motivation. The UN International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF) and the World Health Organization (WHO) and multilateral and bilateral agencies are promoting 4 simple and relatively inexpensive measures to reduce malnutrition, illness, and death among the world's children: the use of growth charts; oral rehydration therapy; breastfeeding and proper weaning practices; and immunization against major childhood diseases. Ways to achieve accelerated progress for the protection and survival of children are identified.
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  5. 5
    034786

    [Operational sequence for the implementation of a subregional food and nutrition strategy] Secuencia operativa para la implementacion de una estrategia subregional de alimentacion y nutricion.

    Salazar de Buckle T; Tantalean J

    In: Lineamientos de una estrategia Andina de alimentacion y nutricion [by] Junta del Acuerdo de Cartegena. Grupo de Politica Technologica. Proyectos Andinos de Desarollo Technologico en el Area de los Alimentos. Lima, Peru, Junta del Acuerdo de Cartagena, Grupo de Politica Technologica, Proyectos Andinos de Desarollo Technologico en el Area de los Alimentos, 1983. 143-74.

    This article outlines and diagrams a recommended operational sequence for implementation of food and nutrition strategy for the Andean region. The multisectorial strategy envisioned by the planners would involve the supply and demand for foods; basic health, environmental sanitation and educational services; and food information and technology. The integrated, multisectorial nature of the strategy requires policies, plans, and programming designed to facilitate harmonious development of all the necessary elements within the 5 Andean countries. The proposed methodology for operationalizing the strategy is based on a systems focus which covers all aspects of production, processing, distribution, final consumption, and technoeconomic policies for food and nutrition. Because the food and nutrition strategy is more than a production program, its design should identify interrelations between the availability and prices of foods, external commerce, industrial trends, food commerce and distribution, and food consumption in adquate quantities by the entire population. A basic service component for health should also be included for the Andean population because of its relationship to nutritional aspects. The suggested instrument for operationalizing the systems focus is the "Methodology for Evaluation andprogramming of Technological and Economic Development of Production and Consumption Systems" developed by the Andean Projects for Technological Development Food Group for the Group for Technological Policy of the Cartagena Accord. The methodology consists of a manual and a "Model of Numerical Experimentation", which permits identification of system components, calculation and evaluation of relevant aspects of each production factor, and design and selection of development alternatives. The Model of Numerical Experimentation" allows simulation of goals for satisfaction of needs, exports of final products, import substitution, different production technologies, commercial margins, subidies, customs duties, taxes and exchange rates and related variables. Various food production systems have already been studied using the methodology in each of the 5 Andean countries. It is recommended that implementation of aspects of the food and nutrition strategy involving food production and consumption proceed in 8 operational sequences: 1) characterization of the current industrial, agroindustrial, and fishing economy 2) identification and selection of basic foods and/or strategies 3) representation and quantification of each of the selected systems 4) evaluation of each system and intersystem relationship 5) identification and selection of systems of production of alternative foodstuffs 6) proposal for a national and regional food system 7) concerted development programming for the regional food system and 8) design of mechanisms of evaluation and follow-up.
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