Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 47 Results

  1. 1
    074890

    The global possible: resources, development, and the new century.

    Global Possible Conference (1984: Wye Plantation)

    In: The global possible: resources, development, and the new century, edited by Robert Repetto. New Haven, Connecticut, Yale University Press, 1985. 491-519. (World Resources Institute Book)

    Participants at the Global Possible Conference in 1984 concluded that, despite the dismal predictions about the earth, we can still fashion a more secure, prosperous, and sustainable world environmentally and economically. The tools to bring about such a world already exist. The international community and nations must implement new policies, however. Government, science, business, and concerned groups must reach new levels of cooperation. Developed and developing countries must form new partnerships to implement sustained improvements in living standards of the world's poor. Peaceful cooperation is needed to eliminate the threat of nuclear war--the greatest threat to life and the environment. Conference working groups prepared an agenda for action which, even though it is organized along sectoral disciplines, illustrates the complex linkages that unite issues in 1 area with those in several others. For example, problems existing in forests tie in with biological diversity, energy and fuelwood, and management of agricultural lands and watersheds. The agenda emphasizes policies and initiatives that synergistically influence serious problems in several sectors. It also tries to not present solutions that generate as many problems as it tries to solve. The 1st section of the agenda covers population, poverty, and development issues. it provides recommendations for developing and developed countries. It discusses urbanization and issues facing cities. The 3rd section embodies freshwater issues and has 1 list of recommendations for all sectors. The agenda addresses biological diversity, tropical forests, agricultural land, living marine resources, energy, and nonfuel minerals in their own separate sections. It discusses international assistance and the environment in 1 section. Another section highlights the need to assess conditions, trends, and capabilities. The last section comprises business, science, an citizens.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    052159

    Our common future.

    World Commission on Environment and Development

    Oxford, England, Oxford University Press, 1987. xv, 400 p.

    In this report, the World Commission on Environment and Development does not predict ever increasing environmental decay, poverty, and hardship in a world becoming more polluted and experiencing decreasing resources but sees instead the possibility for a new era of economic growth. This era of economic growth must be based on policies that sustain and expand the environmental resource base. Such growth is absolutely essential to relieving the great poverty that is intensifying in much of the developing world. The report suggests a pathway by which the peoples of the world can enlarge their spheres of cooperation. The Commission has focused its attention in the areas of population, food security, the loss of species and genetic resources, and human settlements, recognizing that all are connected and cannot be treated in isolation from each other. 2 conditions must be satisfied before international economic exchanges can become beneficial for all involved: the sustainability of ecosystems on which the global economy depends must be guaranteed; and the economic partners must be satisfied that the basis of exchange is equitable. Neither condition is met for many developing nations. Efforts to maintain social and ecological stability through old approaches to development and environmental protection will increase stability. The Commission has identified several actions that must be undertaken to reduce risks to survival and to put future development on sustainable paths. Such a reorientation on a continuing basis is beyond the reach of present decision making structures and institutional arrangements, both national and international. The Commission has taken care to base its recommendations on the realities of present institutions, on what can and must be accomplished now; yet to keep options open for future generations, the present generation must begin to act now and to act together. The Commission's proposals for institutional and legal change at the national, regional, and international levels are embodied in 6 priority areas: getting at the sources; dealing with the effects; assessing global risks; making informed choices; providing the legal means; and investing in the future.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    049402

    Plan of action for the eradication of harmful traditional practices affecting the health of women and children in Africa.

    Inter-African Committee [IAC]

    [Unpublished] 1987. 14 p.

    The traditional and harmful practices such as early marriage and pregnancy, female circumcision, nutritional taboos, inadequate child spacing, and unprotected delivery continue to be the reality for women in many African nations. These harmful traditional practices frequently result in permanent physical, psychological, and emotional changes for women, at times even death, yet little progress has been realized in abolishing these practices. At the Regional Seminar of the Inter-African Committee on Traditional Practices Affecting the Health of Women and Children in Africa, held in Ethiopia during April 1987, guidelines were drawn by which national governments and local bodies along with international and regional organizations might take action to protect women from these unnecessary hazardous traditional practices. These guidelines constitute this "Plan of Action for the Eradication of Harmful Traditional Practices Affecting the Health of Women and Children in Africa." The plan should be implemented within a decade. These guidelines include both shortterm and longterm strategies. Actions to be taken in terms of the organizational machinery are outlined, covering both the national and regional levels and including special support and the use of the mass media. Guidelines are included for action to be taken in regard to childhood marriage and early pregnancy. These cover the areas of education -- both formal and nonformal -- measures to improve socioeconomic status and health, and enacting laws against childhood marriage and rape. In the area of female circumcision, the short term goal is to create awareness of the adverse medical, psychological, social and economic implications of female circumcision. The time frame for this goal is 24 months. The longterm goal is to eradicate female circumcision by 2000 and to restore dignity and respect to women and to raise their status in society. Also outlined are actions to be taken in terms of food prohibitions which affect mostly women and children, child spacing and delivery practices, and legislative and administrative measures. Women in the African region have a critical role to play both in the development of their countries and in the solution of problems arising from the practice of harmful traditions.
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    209228

    [Family health selected list of publications] Sante de la famille liste de publications selectionnees.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Division of Family Health

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization, Division of Family Health, 1985. 15 p. (FHE/85.3.)

    This list of 1978-1984 publications and documents of the World Health Organization (WHO) covers subjects that have been given priority on the regional and global levels relating to family health. The sections are divided into 1) Family Health, 2) Maternal and Child Health, 3) Maternal and Child Care, 4) Infant and Young Child Nutrition, 5) Nutrition, and 6) Health Education. Publications listed with a price, and back numbers of periodicals, are for sale and can be obtained through a bookseller, from any of the stocklists shown at the end of this document, or directly from the WHO distribution and sales office.
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    027442

    Health and health services in Judaea, Samaria and Gaza 1983-1984: a report by the Ministry of Health of Israel to the Thirty-Seventh world Health Assembly, Geneva, May 1984.

    Israel. Ministry of Health

    Jerusalem, Israel, Ministry of Health, 1984 Mar. 195 p.

    Health conditions and health services in Judea, Samaria, and Gaza during the 1967-83 period are discussed. Health-related activities and changes in the social and economic environment are assessed and their impact on health is evaluated. Specific activities performed during the current year are outlined. The following are specific facets of the health care system that are the focus of many current projects in these districts; the development of a comprehensive network of primary care programs and centers for preventive and curative services has been given high priority and is continuing; renovation and expansion of hospital facilities, along with improved staffing, equipment, and supplies for basic and specialty health services increase local capabilities for increasingly sophisticated health care, and consequently there is a decreasing need to send patients requiring specialized care to supraregional referral hospitals, except for highly specialized services; inadequacies in the preexisting reporting system have necessitated a continuting process of development for the gathering and publication of general and specific statistical and demographic data; stress has been placed on provision of safe drinking water, development of sewage and solid waste collection and disposal systems, as well as food control and other environmental sanitation activities; major progress has been made in the establishment of a funding system that elicits the participation and financial support of the health care consumer through volunary health insurance, covering large proportions of the population in the few years since its inception; the continuing building room in residential housing along with the continuous development of essential community sanitation infrastructure services are important factors in improved living and health conditions for the people; and the health system's growth must continue to be accompanied by planning, evaluation, and research atall levels. Specific topics covered include: demography and vital statistics; socioeconomic conditions; morbidity and mortality; hospital services; maternal and child health; nutrition; health education; expanded program immunization; environmental health; mental health; problems of special groups; health insurance; community and voluntary agency participation; international agencies; manpower and training; and planning and evaluation. Over the past 17 years, Judea, Samaria, and Gaza have been areas of rapid population growth and atthe same time of rapid socioeconomic development. In addition there have been basic changes in the social and health environment. As measured by socioeconomic indicators, much progress has been achieved for and by the people. As measured by health status evaluation indicators, the people benefit from an incresing quantity and quality of primary care and specialty services. The expansion of the public health infrastructure, combined with growing access to and utilization of personal preventive services, has been a key contributor to this process.
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    055652

    Breastfeeding as an intervention within diarrhea diseases control programs: WHO/CDD activities.

    Hogan R; Martines J

    In: Proceedings of the Interagency Workshop on Health Care Practices Related to Breastfeeding, December 7-9, 1988, Leavey Conference Center, Georgetown University, Washington, D.C., edited by Miriam Labbok and Margaret McDonald with Mark Belsey, Peter Greaves, Ted Greiner, Margaret Kyenkya-Isabirye, Chloe O'Gara, James Shelton. [Washington, D.C., Georgetown University Medical Center, Institute for International Studies in Natural Family Planning, 1988]. 13 p.. (USAID Contract No. DPE-3040-A-00-5064-00)

    The World Health Organization's (WHO's) Control of Diarrheal Diseases Program (CDD) is seeking ways to prevent diarrhea and has identified breastfeeding as an important factor. CDD has developed activities in both its research and services components. In the research component, results from recent studies, some of which received support from the program, have shown the strong protective effect of breastfeeding against diarrheal morbidity and mortality. Exclusively breastfed infants are at lower risk of experiencing diarrhea than infants who are partially breastfed, and those who are partially breastfed are at lower risk than those who are not breastfed. Breastfeeding, which also may reduce the severity of the diarrheal illness, has a powerful effect on the risk of diarrhea-associated death. CDD's priorities for research support in the area of infant feeding were reviewed at an April 1988 meeting. Further research that the program feels is needed falls into 2 broad categories: trials of hospital and community-based interventions that aim to promote exclusive breastfeeding in the 1st 4-6 months of life; and evaluation of approaches for implementing tested breastfeeding promotion interventions in the context of national diarrheal disease control programs. CDD's services component has as its basic responsibility collaboration with countries in developing national control programs. It applies the results of research and involves activities in planning, oral rehydration solution (ORS) supply, training, communication, monitoring, and evaluation. It is in the area of training that specific recommendations on breastfeeding have been made. These recommendations are outlined. The training courses are being used to train approximately 5000 supervisory and management staff a year. The program plans to monitor the effectiveness of the training and develop future activities based on that information.
    Add to my documents.
  7. 7
    055647

    Supporting breastfeeding: what governments and health workers can do. European experiences.

    Helsing E

    In: Proceedings of the Interagency Workshop on Health Care Practices Related to Breastfeeding, December 7-9, 1988, Leavey Conference Center, Georgetown University, Washington, D.C., edited by Miriam Labbok and Margaret McDonald with Mark Belsey, Peter Greaves, Ted Greiner, Margaret Kyenkya-Isabirye, Chloe O'Gara, James Shelton. [Washington, D.C., Georgetown University Medical Center, Institute for International Studies in Natural Family Planning, 1988]. [21] p.. (USAID Contract No. DPE-3040-A-00-5064-00)

    In 1986 the European Regional World Health Organization (WHO) Office convened a meeting of health workers' organizations to develop a strategy for implementing breastfeeding promotion. The elements in this strategy are outlined along with the reasons why some countries have seen increases in breastfeeding and a discussion of the possible ways international organizations can help. The "International Code of Marketing of Breast-Milk Substitutes" constitutes the clearest mandate for an "action program" in the field of breastfeeding. It provides a framework for action and for the formulation of a breastfeeding promotion strategy. Further, the "Code" identifies the obligations of both governments and health workers. According to the Resolution recommending the "Code," one of the obligations of governments is to report regularly to WHO on the progress in 5 areas of infant nutrition: encouragement and support of breastfeeding; promotion and support of appropriate weaning practices; strengthening of education, training, and information; promotion of health and social status of women in relation to infant and young child feeding; and appropriate marketing and distribution of breast milk substitutes. The WHO member states in the European Region have taken their reporting obligation seriously; 71 reports from 29 of the 32 members states have been received. The picture that emerges is one of large diversity with regard to breastfeeding both among and within countries. The European Strategy outlines 7 priority areas for action: the basic attitude of health workers; maternity ward routines; the formation of breastfeeding mothers' support groups; ways to support employed mothers who want to breastfeed; research in breastfeeding; commercial pressure on health workers; and the need for advocacy of breastfeeding. The promotion of breastfeeding is the cumulative effect of activities from several different disciplines that becomes evident in the statistics as an increase in breastfeeding. Factors that contribute to an increase in breastfeeding, based on the Scandinavian experience, are outlined. In regard to establishing a breastfeeding policy, the various activities that can encourage and support breastfeeding fall into 3 categories: making breast milk available to the baby by influencing the material conditions of breastfeeding; increasing knowledge either about human milk or about lactation management as well as about changing attitudes and behavior; and assuring the quality of the milk itself. Ideally, an organization with an advisory and to some degree an executive, decision-making function coordinates these activities.
    Add to my documents.
  8. 8
    055662

    Breastfeeding and health care services.

    Jolly R

    In: Proceedings of the Interagency Workshop on Health Care Practices Related to Breastfeeding, December 7-9, 1988, Leavey Conference Center, Georgetown University, Washington, D.C., edited by Miriam Labbok and Margaret McDonald with Mark Belsey, Peter Greaves, Ted Greiner, Margaret Kyenkya-Isabirye, Chloe O'Gara, James Shelton. [Washington, D.C., Georgetown University Medical Center, Institute for International Studies in Natural Family Planning, 1988]. 7 p.. (USAID Contract No. DPE-3040-A-00-5064-00)

    Breastfeeding is on the decline in most countries, despite the fact it can help prevent the 38,000 daily deaths of infants and young children through its nutritional, immunologic, and sanitary aspects. The World Health Organization (WHO) and the UN International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF) have combined to issue guidelines on the role of maternity services in promoting breastfeeding. In the most developed countries, breastfeeding has increased despite generally unsupportive hospital environments, the availability of clean water, and the fact that breastfeeding was virtually a lost practice in these countries 40 years ago. An increased awareness of the benefits, some of which are outlined, coupled with mother-to-mother support are most likely to have influenced this increase. The guidelines developed by WHO/UNICEF seek to put into practice specific recommendations agreed upon by pediatricians, obstetricians and gynecologists, nutritionists, nurses, midwives, and other health care providers in national and international forums. The main points of the guidelines are as follows: every facility providing maternity services should develop a policy on breastfeeding, communicate it to all staff, define specific practices to implement the policy, and ensure that all staff are adequately trained in the skills necessary to ensure implementation of the policy; facilities for 24-hour rooming-in, initiation of breastfeeding immediately after delivery, and demand-feeding are essential in every maternity ward; every pregnant mother should be informed fully about how breast milk is formed, the proper way to nurse a child, and the benefits of breastfeeding; and harmful practices, such as the use of bottles and teats for newborn infants, should be eliminated during this early period and exclusive breastfeeding maintained for at least 4-6 months from birth. These activities, when fully implemented, will ensure that every mother/infant couple reached prenatally, at birth, and postnatally gets off to a good start. Then, other support services will be more effective. These standards have been successful in the field and have had a positive impact on the rates of breastfeeding. A need exists for collaboration and an interdisciplinary approach to the promotion, protection, and support of breastfeeding, and, hopefully, this workshop is the first of a series of technical consultations.
    Add to my documents.
  9. 9
    055657

    Technical Working Group D report: government and donor support for breastfeeding in health and health-related programs.

    Dabbs C

    In: Proceedings of the Interagency Workshop on Health Care Practices Related to Breastfeeding, December 7-9, 1988, Leavey Conference Center, Georgetown University, Washington, D.C., edited by Miriam Labbok and Margaret McDonald with Mark Belsey, Peter Greaves, Ted Greiner, Margaret Kyenkya-Isabirye, Chloe O'Gara, James Shelton. [Washington, D.C., Georgetown University Medical Center, Institute for International Studies in Natural Family Planning, 1988]. 3 p.. (USAID Contract No. DPE-3040-A-00-5064-00)

    The focus of the working group was to design a general strategy for government and donor support for breastfeeding promotion in health-related and other nonmaternity health programs. As a start, it is important to examine the reasons why government and donor agencies accept or reject programs to support. 3 steps must be followed for governments to accept breastfeeding: statistics showing declines in breastfeeding within the country need to be gathered; the benefits to the country of promoting breastfeeding would have to be demonstrated; and the link between increased breastfeeding and the decrease in child morbidity and mortality also would have to be demonstrated along with the fact that breastfeeding promotion programs can be done. Both economic arguments and data are necessary. For donor agencies to accept and promote breastfeeding enthusiastically, the benefits of breastfeeding should be shown to be synergistic with benefits from other donor priorities. 2 particular gaps in breastfeeding promotion that would be likely to garner donor support are training and communications. Regional centers for breastfeeding information, advanced training, even newsletter publication would be invaluable. Further, donor agencies could support projects like a review of textbooks and the effective distribution of donor publications.
    Add to my documents.
  10. 10
    055654

    Breastfeeding promotion in family planning programs.

    Jennings VH

    In: Proceedings of the Interagency Workshop on Health Care Practices Related to Breastfeeding, December 7-9, 1988, Leavey Conference Center, Georgetown University, Washington, D.C., edited by Miriam Labbok and Margaret McDonald with Mark Belsey, Peter Greaves, Ted Greiner, Margaret Kyenkya-Isabirye, Chloe O'Gara, James Shelton. [Washington, D.C., Georgetown University Medical Center, Institute for International Studies in Natural Family Planning, 1988]. 7 p.. (USAID Contract No. DPE-3040-A-00-5064-00)

    The US Agency for International Development (USAID) and the Institute for International Studies in Natural Family Planning are at work to find ways to remove barriers to family planning breastfeeding promotion efforts. Barriers include lack of or conflicting measures of program success along with lack of information on the breastfeeding/fertility relationship. The 2 organizations have taken the following steps to assist family planning organizations to increase their promotion and support of breastfeeding: identify current activities and potential barriers to breastfeeding promotion; develop guidelines for breastfeeding support and promotion; assess feasibility and impact of the guidelines; and disseminate the guidelines. Much remains to be done to integrate family planning and breastfeeding. The keys to success are: generating and communicating information which can be used readily by both the population and health policymakers in family planning programs; developing and disseminating guidelines and prototype materials which can be adapted to program needs; identifying, implementing, and evaluating programmatic ways to promote breastfeeding in community and clinical settings; and involving the population community -- at the local, national, and international levels, and in research, service delivery, policy, and training -- in an ongoing dialogue about the relationship of family planning and breastfeeding.
    Add to my documents.
  11. 11
    055286

    The World Health Organization's work in the area of infant and young child feeding and nutrition.

    Carballo M

    In: Programmes to promote breastfeeding, edited by Derrick B. Jelliffe and E. F. Patrice Jelliffe. Oxford, England, Oxford University Press, 1988. 235-47.

    The work of the WHO in promoting, monitoring, researching, and regulating breastfeeding and infant nutrition is reviewed. WHO has always fostered infant nutrition, but took up the subject of breastfeeding in 1974 at its 27th World Health Assembly with an expression of concern for decline of the practice. Breastfeeding is a learned behavior in humans that must be supported and reinforced: secular factors are converging to decrease breastfeeding in most of the world. The 1974 assembly set up a working group to initiate research, to collect data on infant nutrition and breastfeeding practices, composition of breast milk in different socioeconomic milieu, methods of conducting controlled studies on mortality in relation to feeding, and effects of hormonal contraceptives on lactation. 3 distinct patterns of feeding were found, among the urban poor, economically advantaged, and rural mothers. A 1979 meeting concluded that monitoring of feeding practices is necessary to set up national programs Training workshops were held and instructive materials were developed. Papers presented at the meeting were published. WHO with UNICEF are promoting the health and social status of mothers, such as nutrition, maternity protection, and support of women's organizations. WHO is collaborating with the International Labor Office (ILO) to survey maternity protection in 129 countries. A final issue being addressed is the infant food industry. In 1985, the World Health Assembly reported that the International Code of Marketing, involving labeling, marketing and regulation of infant foods, has been adopted wholly or in part by 141 countries.
    Add to my documents.
  12. 12
    055466

    National improvements: reasons and prospects in Sweden.

    Hofvander Y

    In: Programmes to promote breastfeeding, edited by Derrick B. Jelliffe and E.F. Patrice Jelliffe. Oxford, England, Oxford University Press, 1988. 86-93.

    The Nursing Mothers' Association was formed in Sweden in the early 1970s, and the group worked to gain access to mass media to influence attitudes through articles and interviews in which they demanded support and encouragement for breastfeeding. A large number of research reports also emerged in the 1970s, demonstrating the benefits and superiority of breastfeeding and breast milk. Further, the active support from international organizations such as WHO and UNICEF was of considerable value as was the controversy leading to the formulation of the Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes, which helped to focus the interest of the mass media on the issue. Sweden's Board of Health and Welfare appointed an expert group to propose a plan of action, and the group edited a comprehensive textbook on breastfeeding and breast milk to be used as a national guide. The Nursing Mothers' Association developed to a national organization with representatives visiting maternity units and offering to provide advice by telephone after the mother's discharge. 10 years after the rediscovery of breastfeeding there are several hundred thousand mothers with considerable breastfeeding experience. On a limited scale, Sweden has returned to earlier days when young women learned from older and more knowledgeable women. A wealth of personal experience has been gathered and is being conveyed to others in an informal person-to-person manner. Sweden's baby-food industry has adjusted well to the new situation and has accepted a considerable reduction in sales of breast milk substitutes and has complied with the Code. The dramatic increase in breastfeeding in almost all industrialized nations, including Sweden, suggests a strong movement and that breastfeeding is here to stay.
    Add to my documents.
  13. 13
    054532

    The Oslo Declaration. Joint summary of the Oslo Conference on Sustainable Development.

    Brundtland GH; Perez de Cuellar J

    POPULI. 1988; 15(4):50-2.

    Participants in the 1988 Oslo Conference on Sustainable Development explored ways the United Nations system can promote sustainable development by enhancing global economic growth and social development. The deterioration of the environment, and the attendant problems of poverty and resource depletion, demand international cooperation and a new ethic based on equity, human solidarity, and accountability. Priority issues identified by conference participants included the following: developing human resources and fully integrated population policies; protecting the atmosphere and the global climate, ocean, and water resources; halting desertification and countering deforestation; controlling dissemination of dangerous wastes and aiming at the elimination of such toxins; increasing technology cooperation; controlling soil erosion and the loss of species; and securing economic growth, social justice, and a more equitable distribution of income and resources within and among countries as means for alleviating poverty. It was emphasized that poverty alleviation and environmental preservation can be made cost-effective components of development plans and programs and should not be considered as barriers to economic growth.
    Add to my documents.
  14. 14
    040749

    Energy and protein requirements.

    Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations [FAO]; World Health Organization [WHO]

    Rome, Italy, FAO, 1973. 118 p. (FAO Nutrition Meetings Report Series No. 52; WHO Technical Report Series No. 522)

    The present Joint Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization (FAO/WHO) Ad Hoc Expert Committee met from March 22 to April 2, 1971 to consider energy and protein requirements together and to examine fully this interrelationships so that a diet or a food supply might be assessed simultaneously in terms of its energy and protein content. Its specific tasks were to: examine the characteristics and criteria of the reference man and reference woman; review new data as a basis for revising estimates of requirements and recommended intakes for energy, protein, and essential amino acids; and consider the method of chemical scoring and other methods used in the evaluation of the nutritive value of proteins. The committee was asked to examine the interrelationships between requirements for energy and proteins and to recommend means for the integration of requirement scales for energy and proteins, if that were feasible. Additionally, this committee report includes a discussion of basic concepts, a glossary of terms and units, some background information, as well as identification of practical applications and future research needs. 5 annexes contain: percentiles for weight and height of males and females aged 0-18 years; calculation of the energy values of foods or food groups by the Atwater system; conversion of nitrogen to protein; standard basal metabolic rates of individuals of both sexes; and some values of energy expenditures in everyday activities.
    Add to my documents.
  15. 15
    043958

    Health, ethics and human values.

    Bankowski Z; Gutteridge F

    WORLD HEALTH. 1987 Jun; 9-11.

    The Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences (CIOMS), a nongovernmental organization, arranges conferences with the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNESCO on new developments in biology and medicine to explore their social, ethical, moral, administrative, economic, and legal implications. The objective is to create international and interdisciplinary forums where the scientific and lay communities can express their views on topics of immediate concern, unhampered by administrative, political, or other considerations. The primary objectives of the Round Table Conference held in Athens in 1987 were: to identify and compare the ethical content of selected health policy issues from the perspectives of different national, cultural, and religious settings; to examine the interaction of ethical factors and other determinants of health policy in the policymaking process; to explore ways to assist countries in dealing with the interaction of ethics and health policymaking; and to evaluate the usefulness of this kind of dialogue. The conference proposed 3 approaches: an examination of the practical problems of making policy decisions; an examination of a series of case studies; and an examination of the fundamental values underlying the interaction of health policy, ethics, and human values underlying the interaction of health policy, ethics, and human values by considering the meanings which life, suffering, and death hold for a number of the world's principal religions and ideologies. WHO's principal theme for this and the next decade -- the goal of health for all by the year 2000 -- was identified as a central issue in considering health policy, ethics, and human values. Participants reviewed 5 case studies, chosen as being of interest to both developed and developing countries: the allocation of resources for primary health care; public policy and hereditary disease; care of low birth weight infants; health care of the elderly; and organ substitution therapy. The discussion highlighted some of the paradoxes in today's approaches to the problems. It was agreed that there should be continued collaborative followup of the issues discussed and that a mechanism should be established that would support regional groupings in a continued inquiry into issues of regional interest. CIOMS will serve as the organizing focal point.
    Add to my documents.
  16. 16
    034916

    Breastfeeding--a life-saver in the Third World.

    Arton M

    MIDWIVES CHRONICLE. 1985 Jul; 98(1170):200-1.

    At the April meeting of the World Health Organization (WHO), experts in occupational health concluded that there is no evidence to justify the exclusion of women from any type of employment. Yet, they simultaneously underscored the need for conditions in places of work to be adapted to women, and in particular to those women employed in manual work, whether agriculture or manufacture. This was WHO's 1st meeting on the subject of health and the working woman. According to the experts, anatomical and physiological differences between men and women should not limit job opportunities. As more and more women enter the work force, machines need to be redesigned to take into account the characteristics of working women. In industries where strength is a requirement, e.g., mining, a certain level of body strength and size should be established and applied to both sexes. Also recommended were measures to protect women of childbearing age, who form the majority of women in the work force, against the hazards of chemicals -- gases, lead, solder fumes, sterilizing agents, pesticides -- and other threats to health deriving from the work places. Chemicals or ionizing radiation absorbed into the body could lead to mutagenicity, not only of women but also of men. In cases where a woman has conceived, mutagenicity could mean fetal death, or, where damage is done to sperm or ovum, lead to congenital malformation and to leukemia in newborns. Solvents so absorbed could appear in breast milk, thus poisoning the baby. Ionizing radiation, used in several industrial operations, also has been linked to breast cancer. As women increasingly take jobs that once used to be done solely by men, more needs to be known about the hazards of their health and of the psychosocial implications of long working hours. The following were included among recommendations made to increase knowledge and to protect health: that epidemiological studies be conducted in the risk of working women as well as more research on the effects of chemicals on pregnant workers; that working women be allowed to breastfeed children for at least 6 months at facilities set up at work places; and that information and health education programs be carried out to alert women against occupational health hazards.
    Add to my documents.
  17. 17
    201302

    Rural development: a select bibliography, 1987.

    United Nations. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific [ESCAP]

    Bangkok, Thailand, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, 1988. v, 133 p. (ESCAP Library Bibliographical Series No. D. 11)

    This 486-item bibliography is compiled from materials selected from the computerized ESCAP Bibliographic Information System data base. The bibliography includes monographs, documents, and serial articles received in the ESCAP Library and the libraries of some other UN agencies during 1987. Contents are arranged under 7 broad subjects widely used among rural development staff and researchers: agriculture; application of science and technology; health and social services; human resources development and institutions; industrial development; physical infrastructure, natural resources and environment; and policies and planning. Author, title, and geographic area indexes appear after the bibliography.
    Add to my documents.
  18. 18
    200337

    Health and the family life cycle: selected studies on the interaction between mortality, the family and its life cycle.

    Germany, Federal Republic of. Bundesinstitut fur Bevolkerungsforschung; World Health Organization [WHO]

    Wiesbaden, Federal Republic of Germany, Federal Institute for Population Research, 1982. 503 p.

    The family is the basic unit of society within which reproductive behavior, socialization patterns, and relations with the community are determined. The concept of the family life cycle provides an important frame of reference for the study of the history of a family traced through its various stages of development. The World Health Organization has developed a comprehensive program relating to the statistical aspects of the interrelationships between health and the family. The main objectives are: 1) to clarify the basic conceptual issues involved and to develop a family life cycle model; 2) to explore the statistical aspects of family-oriented health demography research; 3) to test and apply the methodology to the study of populations at different socioeconomic levels; and 4) to set forth some implications of the findings for social policy, health demography research, and the generation of a database for such studies. Demography research on the family consequences of mortality changes should not be limited to the study of their effect on the size and structure of the family, but should also deal with the impact on the timing of events and the life cycle as a dynamic phenomenon that is subject to change. This publication is from the 1981 Final Meeting on Family Life Cycle Methodology. The background documents fall into 3 main topics: 1) conceptual and methodological issues, 2) review of available evidence on the interaction between mortality and the family life cycle; and 3) case studies.
    Add to my documents.
  19. 19
    200354

    Mortality and health issues: review of current situation and study guidelines.

    United Nations. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific [ESCAP]

    Bangkok, Thailand, United Nations, Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, 1985. iv, 112 p. (Asian Population Studies Series No. 63.)

    Over the past 3 decades, most of the countries in the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) region have witnessed unprecedented declines in mortality--a phenomenon that has resulted in a remarkable increase in their population size. This paper documents the results of an ESCAP and World Health Organization study to analyze the trends and patterns of mortality in the region, taking into consideration the variability in levels and trends, as well as their antecedents and consequences. Long term objectives are: 1) to investigate the dynamics of mortality change by examining mortality trends in relation to other demographic processes, 2) to examine the implication of observed mortality trends and patterns for existing developmental programs, and 3) to provide a scientific basis for the formulation of intervention policies aimed at the reduction of mortality in the region. The advent of vaccines, major public health programs, effective vector control, antibiotics, and chemotherapeutics are the responsible factors for the sustained transition of mortality after the 1940s and 1950s. The study is divided into 3 phases: 1) phase 1 to be completed by late February 1985; 2) phase 2 to be completed by June 1985; and 3) phase 3 to be completed by January 1986. Background papers address the following issues: 1) the implications of mortality trends and patterns for economic, health, and social welfare planning; 2) future outlook of the mortality situation and mortality projections; and 3) methodological aspects of the study of biological and socioeconomic correlates of mortality.
    Add to my documents.
  20. 20
    038831
    Peer Reviewed

    Excerpts from the WHO Code for the Marketing of Breast-Milk Substitutes.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    BIRTH. 1985 Winter; 12(4):243-4.

    This article sets forth excerpts from the World Health Organization (WHO) Code for the Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes. The purpose of these guidelines is to ensure that infant formula is not marketed or distributed in ways that interfere with the protection and promotion of breastfeeding. It is specified that informational and educational materials dealing with infant feeding practices should include clear material on the following points: 1) the benefits and superiority of breastfeeding, 2) maternal nutrition in preparation for breastfeeding, 3) the negative effect on breastfeeding of the introduction of partial bottlefeeding, 4) the difficulty of reversing the decision not to breastfeed, and 5) the proper use of infant formula. Materials on infant formula should include the social and financial implications of its use, the health hazards of inappropriate foods, and the health hazards of unnecessary or improper use of infant formula. Donations of educational equipment or materials by manufacturers or distributors of infant formula should be made only at the request of the appropriate government authority and should be distributed only through the health care system. There should be no advertising or other promotion to the general public of infant formula products. Manufacturers should not provide samples of products to pregnant women or mothers, and there should be no point-of-sale advertising or giving of samples or gifts. No health care facility may be used for the purpose of promoting infant formula, and health care workers are expected to encourage and protect breastfeeding. Information provided to health professionals by manufacturers and distributors of infant formula should be restricted to scientific and factual matters and should not imply that bottlefeeding is equivalent or superior to breastfeeding.
    Add to my documents.
  21. 21
    205134

    The World Bank Population, Health and Nutrition Department, Policy and Research Division fiscal year 1986-1988 work program.

    World Bank. Population, Health and Nutrition Department

    [Unpublished] [1986]. iii, 9, 5 p.

    This note presents the work program of the Policy and Research Division of the World Bank Population, Health, and Nutrition Department for the fiscal years 1988. Although this note was prepared mainly for internal review purposes in the department and in the Bank, it has been circulated outside the Bank to increase awareness of the department policy and research activities. This note 1) lists department staff, 2) gives a brief overview of the department's work, 3) relates the history of the department, and 4) describes the department's activities by objectives. The department's objectives comprise 1) population, 2) population in Sub-Saharan Africa, 3) health, 4) pharmaceuticals, 5) nutrition, 6) intersectoral links, and 7) poverty alleviation. The principal population activities include work on the role of the private sector in family planning, incentives for small family size, cost-effective approaches to the delivery of family planning services, and a population lending review. Work on population in Sub-Saharan Africa centers on adolescent fertility and spatial population distribution. The work program in health reviews health financing and the cost-effectiveness of alternative health interventions. Research on pharmaceuticals examines a range of potential policy interventions on the demand and supply side. A nutrition paper is being prepared on the cost-effectiveness of nutrition interventions, especially as part of primary health care. Intersectoral issues include the links between population, health, and nutrition on one hand and other sectors, such as agriculture and education on the other hand. Work on poverty alleviation examines the extent to which population, health, and nutrition projects should reach out to poor client groups. Research activities in each of these 7 areas are described. An annex lists recent staff papers on these subjects.
    Add to my documents.
  22. 22
    038364

    IPPF involvement in the International Youth Year: a progress report.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    [London, England], IPPF, 1986 Jan 31. 5, 13 p.

    This report provides a brief description of the International Planned Parenthood Federation's (IPPF) involvement in and contributions to International Youth Year (IYY). IYY reinforced an IPPF priority program area for the 1980s--meeting the needs of young people--and all member family planning associations were encouraged to establish links with IYY national coordinating committees. IPPF was also instrumental in the formation of a nongovernmental Working Group on Family Life Education comprised of representatives from a range of organizations involved in youth work and is preparing a resource book on family life education for these groups. The guidelines for action for IYY, prepared by a United Nations Advisory Committee in which IPPF was a major participant, urge governments to promote culturally appropriate family life education, encourage young people and their organizations to be active in the implementation of population programs, promote social policies to strengthen the family, encourage community education to counteract adolescent pregnancy, and ensure that family life and sex education are available to young people. Where necessary, family planning information and services can be made available to adolescents within a country's sociocultural context. There is a need to sustain the global interst in youth concerns generated by IYY and to translate into action the recommendations and resolutions on youth that were developed. It is essential that such action consider factors such as the promotion and protection of the rights and responsibilities of young people, sensitivity to local traditions, identification and mobilization of local resources, interagency cooperation, and involvement of young people in decision making. The document concludes with progress reports from 30 countries on family planning association activities in support of IYY.
    Add to my documents.
  23. 23
    034877

    Toward 2000: the quest for universal health in the Americas.

    Acuna HR

    Washington, D.C, Pan American Health Organization, 1983. x, 145 p. (Scientific Publication No. 435)

    This document, prepared by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), reviews health in the Americas in the period 1905-47, provides a more detailed assessment of progress in the health sector during the 1970s, and then outlines prospects for the period 1980-2000 in terms of meeting the goal of health for all by the year 2000. The main feature of this goal is its comprehensiveness. Health is no longer viewed as a matter of disease, but as a social outcome of national development. Attainment of this goal demands far-reaching socioeconomic changes, as well as revision of the concepts underlying national health systems. It seems likely that the coming period in Latin America and the Caribbean will be characterized by intense urban concentration and rapid industrialization, with a trend toward increasing heterogeneity. If current development trends continue, the gap in living standards between urban and rural areas will widen due to sharp differences in productivity. Regionally based development planning could raise living standards and reduce inequalities. In the type of development expected, the role of social services is essential. It will be necessary to determine whether the objective is to provide the poor with access to services that are to be available to all or to provide special services for target groups. The primary health care strategy must be applicable to the entire population, not just a limited program to meet the minimal needs of the extreme poor. Pressing issues regarding health services in the next 2 decades include how to extend their coverage, increase and strengthen their operating capacity, improve their planning and evaluation, increase their efficiency, and improve their information systems. Governments and ministries must be part of effective infrastructures in which finance, intersectoral linkages, community participation, and intercountry and hemispheric cooperation have adequate roles. One of PAHO's key activities must be systematic monitoring and evaluation of strategies and plans of action for attaining health for all.
    Add to my documents.
  24. 24
    034948

    World plan of action for the implementation of the objectives of the International Women's Year: a summarized version.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Centre for Social Development and Humanitarian Affairs

    New York, New York, United Nations, 1976. 43 p.

    This booklet's objective is to bring the World Plan of Action for the Implementation of the Objectives of the International Women's Year to a wide audience. The 1st section focuses on national action -- overall national policy, national machinery and national legislation, funding, and minimum objectives to be realized by 1980. The 2nd section covers specific areas for national action: international cooperation and the strengthening of international peace; political participation; education and training; employment and related economic roles; health and nutrition; the family in modern society; population; housing and related facilities; and other social questions. The subsequent 4 sections deal with the following: research, data collection and analysis; mass media; international and regional action; and review and appraisal. A major focus of the Plan is to provide guidelines for national action for the 10-year period up to 1985 which the Generaly Assembly, at its 30th session, proclaimed as the Decade for Women: Equality, Development and Peace. Its recommendations are addressed primarily to governments and to all public and private institutions, political parties, employers, trade unions, nongovernmental organizations, women's and youth groups and all other groups, and the mass communication media. Governments are urged to establish short, medium, and longterm targets and objectives to implement the Plan. The following are among the objectives envisaged as a minimum to be achieved by 1980: literacy and civic education should be significantly increased, especially among rural women; coeducational, technical, and vocational training should be available in both industrial and rural areas; equal access at every level of education, including compulsory primary school education, should be ensured; employment opportunities should be increased, unemployment reduced, and discriminatory employment conditions should be eliminated; infrastructural services should be established and increased, where necessary, in both rural and urban areas; legislation should be introduced, where necessary, to ensure women of voting and electoral rights, equal legal capacity, and equal employment opportunities and conditions; there should be more women in policymaking positions locally, nationally, and internationally; more comprehensive measures for health education, sanitation, nutrition, family education, family planning, and other welfare services should be provided; and equal exercise of civil, social, and political rights should be guaranteed.
    Add to my documents.
  25. 25
    034419

    The United Nations Decade for Women: an end and a beginning.

    Who Chronicle. 1985; 39(5):163-70.

    The World Conference to appraise the achievements of the UN Decade for Women was held in Nairobi, Kenya during July 1985 and was attended by 6000 delegates. In preparation for the Nairobi conference, the Director General of the World Health Organization (WHO) issued a report analyzing the situation regarding women, health, and development and drawing attention to the special health needs of women as well as to the key roles that women play in promoting health and development. Accurate, adequate, and relevant information is essential if appropriate action is to be taken, and much of WHO's efforts during the Decade focused on collecting such information. According to the Director General's report, women's contribution to development is underestimated and their potential is grossly underestimated. Their health status also is conditioned by factors such as employment, education, and social status. Ultimately, women's participation in health and development may even depend on equitable access to economic resources and political power. Thus, the report stresses that it is imperative not to view the health aspects in isolation. The status society accords women is closely linked to their reproductive function. Yet, despite this vital function, girls are valued less than boys in many countries. Nowhere is the inequity in women's status more apparent than in their economic situation. A study on the training and utilization of traditional birth attendants was carried out in the Eastern Mediterranean Region, and 3 Member States were then assisted in launching national training programs. In the Eastern Mediterranean Region, WHO collaborated with countries in pilot projects for the early detection and treatment of cervical and breast cancer. Legislative and policy issues relative to the welfare of women also have been studied. Among the subjects coverd have been the protection of working mothers, measures governing the minimum legal age of marriage, and harmful traditional practices. The grassroots organizations are the primary focus of WHO's strategy for involving women's organizations in primary health care since they serve the poor and the powerless and their goal is usually to satisfy the immediate needs of their members. WHO has initiated a multinational study on women as providers of health care, in which 17 Member States have participated. The Joint WHO/UNICEF Nutrition Support Program, initiated in 1982, supports action to improve the nutritional status of women and children.
    Add to my documents.

Pages