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  1. 1
    081945

    Conservation of West and Central African rainforests. Conservation de la foret dense en Afrique centrale et de l'Ouest.

    Cleaver K; Munasinghe M; Dyson M; Egli N; Peuker A; Wencelius F

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 1992. xi, 353 p. (World Bank Environment Paper No. 1)

    This World Bank publication is a collection of selected papers presented at the Conference on Conservation of West and Central African Rainforests in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, in November 1990. These rainforests are very important to the stability of the regional and global environment, yet human activity is destroying them at a rate of 2 million hectares/year. Causes of forest destruction are commercial logging for export, conversion of forests into farmland, cutting of forests for fuelwood, and open-access land tenure systems. Other than an introduction and conclusion, this document is divided into 8 broad topics: country strategies, agricultural nexus, natural forestry management, biodiversity and conservation, forest peoples and products, economic values, fiscal issues, and institutional and private participation issues. Countries addressed in the country strategies section include Zaire, Cameroon, Sao Tome and Principe, and Nigeria. The forest peoples and products section has the most papers: wood products and residual from forestry operations in the Congo; Kutafuta Maisha: searching for life on Zaire's Ituri forest frontier; development in the Central African rainforest: concern for forest peoples; concern for Africa's forest peoples: a touchstone of a sustainable development policy; Tropical Forestry Action Plans and indigenous people: the case of Cameroon; forest people and people in the forest: investing in local community development; and women and the forest: use and conservation of forestry resources other than wood. Topics in the economic values section range from debt-for-nature swaps to environmental labeling. Forestry taxation and forest revenue systems are discussed under fiscal issues. The conclusion discusses saving Africa's rainforests.
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  2. 2
    075154

    State of the marine environment in the South Asian Seas Region.

    Sen Gupta R; Ali M; Bhuiyan AL; Hossain MM; Sivalingam PM; Subasinghe S; Tirmizi NM

    [Nairobi, Kenya], United Nations Environment Programme [UNEP], 1990. [5], 42 p. (UNEP Regional Seas Reports and Studies No. 123)

    The UN Environment Programme (UNEP) ocean program is studying global marine environments to form a policy to protect the oceans. This report examines the marine environment of the Indian Ocean, Bay of Bengal, the Arabian Sea, and the Andaman Sea. Bacteria and viruses comprise the most important contaminants in the South Asia seas. They enter marine life which humans eat and then develop diarrhea. Pathogens enter the seas through untreated sewage which causes much eutrophication. Zooplankton contain considerable concentrations of heavy metals and pesticides. None of the zooplankton samples drawn from seas around India in 1978, 1981, 1983, and 1985 contained mercury, however. Yet mercury and other heavy metals are present in fish species in at least the Ganges River estuary, Andaman Sea, the Karachi harbor in Pakistan, and seas around Bangladesh. Common chlorinated pesticides found off the coast of India include DDT, aldrin, dieldrin, and BHC. Industrial development is increasing the levels of other contaminants such as solid waste and synthetic detergents. Coastal erosion is common in South Asia. Considerable siltation occurs at the head of the Bay of Bengal. Several urban areas are reclaiming the sea using materials from solid wastes and garbage, but these materials leach which causes public health problems. In India, nuclear power plants operate near the coast where they release 50% of the generated heat to the coastal environment. Dredge materials from harbors in India are dumped offshore which resulted in almost complete depletion of fisheries near these harbors. Tourism poses a threat to coastal environments due to the increase in nonbiodegradable solid waste such as cans, plastics, and empty bottles. Oil tanker disasters, bilge washings, and discharge of ballast water contribute to the sizable amount of oil pollution in the Indian ocean. Exploitation damages coral reefs, mineral deposits, mangroves, and marine life.
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