Your search found 109 Results

  1. 1
    375798

    International technical guidance on sexuality education. An evidence-informed approach. Revised edition.

    UNESCO. Education Sector

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2018. 139 p.

    The fully revised UN International technical guidance on sexuality education advocates for quality comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) to promote health and well-being, respect for human rights and gender equality, and empowers children and young people to lead healthy, safe and productive lives.It is a technical tool that presents the evidence base and rationale for delivering CSE to young people in order to achieve the global Sustainable Development Goals, among which are SGD3 for Health, SDG4 for Quality Education and SDG5 for Gender Equality.
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  2. 2
    390667
    Peer Reviewed

    Documentation of polio eradication initiative best practices: Experience from WHO African Region.

    Okeibunor J; Nshimirimana D; Nsubuga P; Mutabaruka E; Tapsoba L; Ghali E; Kabir SH; Gassasira A; Mihigo R; Mkanda P

    Vaccine. 2016 Oct 10; 34(43):5144-5149.

    BACKGROUND: The African Region is set to achieving polio eradication. During the years of operations, the Polio Eradication Initiative [PEI] in the Region mobilized and trained tremendous amount of manpower with specializations in surveillance, social mobilization, supplementary immunization activities [SIAs], data management and laboratory staff. Systems were put in place to accelerate the eradication of polio in the Region. Standardized, real-time surveillance and response capacity were established. Many innovations were developed and applied to reaching people in difficult and security challenged terrains. All of these resulted in accumulation of lessons and best practices, which can be used in other priority public health intervention if documented. METHODS: The World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa [WHO/AFRO] developed a process for the documentation of these best practices, which was pretested in Uganda. The process entailed assessment of three critical elements [effectiveness, efficiency and relevance] five aspects [ethical soundness, sustainability, involvement of partners, community involvement, and political commitment] of best practices. A scored card which graded the elements and aspects on a scale of 0-10 was developed and a true best practice should score >50 points. Independent public health experts documented polio best practices in eight countries in the Region, using this process. The documentation adopted the cross-sectional design in the generation of data, which combined three analytical designs, namely surveys, qualitative inquiry and case studies. For the selection of countries, country responses to earlier questionnaire on best practices were screened for potential best practices. Another criterion used was the level of PEI investment in the countries. RESULTS: A total of 82 best practices grouped into ten thematic areas were documented. There was a correlation between the health system performances with DPT3 as proxy, level of PEI investment in countries with number of best practice. The application of the process for the documentation of polio best practices in the African Region brought out a number of advantages. The triangulation of data collected using multiple methods and the collection of data from all levels of the programme proved useful as it provided opportunity for data verification and corroboration. It also helped to overcome some of the data challenge. Copyright (c) 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.
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  3. 3
    374729

    Optimal feeding of low-birthweight infants in low- and middle-income countries: highlights from the World Health Organization 2011 guidelines.

    Maternal and Child Survival Program [MCSP]

    [Washington, D.C.], MCSP, 2017 Jun. 6 p. (USAID Cooperative Agreement No. AID-OAA-A-14-00028)

    This brief presents the updated WHO Guidelines on Optimal Feeding of Low Birth-Weight Infants in Low- and Middle-Income Countries, and highlights changes and best practices for optimal feeding of LBW infants. It is intended to assist policymakers, program managers, educators, and health care providers involved in caring for LBW infants to put the recommendations into action. It is hoped that such actions will contribute to improving the quality of care for LBW infants, thereby reducing LBW mortality and improving health outcomes for this group.
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  4. 4
    374728

    Basic newborn resuscitation: highlights from the World Health Organization 2012 guidelines.

    Maternal and Child Survival Program [MCSP]

    [Washington, D.C.], MCSP, 2017 Jun. 5 p. (USAID Cooperative Agreement No. AID-OAA-A-14-00028)

    This brief complements the 2012 WHO Guidelines on Basic Newborn Resuscitation, and highlights key changes and best practices for newborn resuscitation in resource-limited settings. Successful implementation of these recommendations at the time of birth is intended to improve the quality of care for newborns, and contribute to better health outcomes and reduce preventable newborn deaths and disabilities due to birth asphyxia.
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  5. 5
    323635

    Responding to children and adolescents who have been sexually abused. WHO clinical guidelines.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2017. 86 p.

    Sexual abuse of children and adolescents is a gross violation of their rights and a global public health problem. It adversely affects the health of children and adolescents. Health care providers are in a unique position to provide an empathetic response to children and adolescents who have been sexually abused. Such a response can go a long way in helping survivors recover from the trauma of sexual abuse. WHO has published new clinical guidelines Responding to children and adolescents who have been sexually abused aimed at helping front-line health workers, primarily from low resource settings, in providing evidence-based, quality, trauma-informed care to survivors. The guidelines emphasize the importance of promoting safety, offering choices and respecting the wishes and autonomy of children and adolescents. They cover recommendations for post-rape care and mental health; and approaches to minimizing distress in the process of taking medical history, conducting examination and documenting findings.
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  6. 6
    374604

    Using the international human rights system to protect and promote the rights of women migrant workers.

    United Nations. UN Women

    New York, New York, UN Women, [2017]. 7 p. (Policy Brief No. 6)

    This Brief provides an overview of the international human rights system as it applies to the promotion and protection of women migrant workers’ rights. Using examples from UN Women’s joint EU-funded project "Promoting and Protecting Women Migrant Workers’ Labour and Human Rights: Engaging with International, National Human Rights Mechanisms to Enhance Accountability" (the Project), which is anchored nationally in three pilot countries: Mexico, Moldova, and the Philippines, this Brief illustrates how these mechanisms can be used by governments, civil society and development partners, to enhance the rights of women migrant workers in law and practice.
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  7. 7
    375725

    17 ways to end FGM / C. Lessons from the field.

    Jensen J; Diop NJ; Jubero M; Legesse B

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2017. 80 p.

    The 2016 Annual Report for the UNFPA-UNICEF Joint Programme on Female Genital Mutilation / Cutting provides two perspectives: The main document analyses progress in quantitative terms, provides an account of how our budget was allocated and offers profiles of each of the 17 programme countries. This companion booklet uses a qualitative and narrative approach to examine more specifically the challenges, complexities and achievements on the ground. It explores the innovative approaches the Joint Programme teams, partners and activists employ to deconstruct the social norms that allow FGM / C to continue in many communities.
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  8. 8
    374422

    Under-served and over-looked: prioritizing contraceptive equity for the poorest and most marginalized women and girls.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2017 Jul. 40 p.

    This report is a synthesis of evidence revealed from a literature review, including 68 reports from 34 countries. The results are dire: the poorest women and girls, in the poorest communities of the poorest countries are still not benefitting from the global investment in family planning and the joined up actions of the global family planning movement. Women in the poorest countries who want to avoid pregnancy are one-third as likely to be using a modern method as those living in higher-income developing countries.
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  9. 9
    374327

    10 essentials for services provision to survivors of violence against women.

    United Nations. UN Women

    2016 Nov; New York, New York, UN Women, 2016 Nov. 2 p.

    Violence against women and girls is one of the most universal and pervasive human rights violations in the world, of pandemic proportions, with country data showing that about one third of women in the world report experiencing physical or sexual violence at some point in their lifetime, mainly by their partners. UN Women provides knowledge-based policy and programming guidance to a diverse array of stakeholders at international, regional and country levels often partnering with other UN agencies and stakeholders. UN Women’s work is broadly focused on a comprehensive approach to ending violence against women and girls that addresses legislation and policies, prevention, services for survivors, research and data. The briefs included in this package aim to summarize in a concise and friendly way, for advocates, programmers and policy makers, the essential strategies for addressing violence against women in general, for preventing violence and providing services to survivors in particular.
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  10. 10
    374326

    10 essentials for prevention of violence against women.

    United Nations. UN Women

    2016 Nov; New York, New York, UN Women, 2016 Nov. 2 p.

    Violence against women and girls is one of the most universal and pervasive human rights violations in the world, of pandemic proportions, with country data showing that about one third of women in the world report experiencing physical or sexual violence at some point in their lifetime, mainly by their partners. UN Women provides knowledge-based policy and programming guidance to a diverse array of stakeholders at international, regional and country levels often partnering with other UN agencies and stakeholders. UN Women’s work is broadly focused on a comprehensive approach to ending violence against women and girls that addresses legislation and policies, prevention, services for survivors, research and data. The briefs included in this package aim to summarize in a concise and friendly way, for advocates, programmers and policy makers, the essential strategies for addressing violence against women in general, for preventing violence and providing services to survivors in particular.
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  11. 11
    374325

    10 essentials for addressing violence against women.

    United Nations. UN Women

    2016 Nov; New York, New York, UN Women, 2016 Nov. 2 p.

    Violence against women and girls is one of the most universal and pervasive human rights violations in the world, of pandemic proportions, with country data showing that about one third of women in the world report experiencing physical or sexual violence at some point in their lifetime, mainly by their partners. UN Women provides knowledge-based policy and programming guidance to a diverse array of stakeholders at international, regional and country levels often partnering with other UN agencies and stakeholders. UN Women’s work is broadly focused on a comprehensive approach to ending violence against women and girls that addresses legislation and policies, prevention, services for survivors, research and data. The briefs included in this package aim to summarize in a concise and friendly way, for advocates, programmers and policy makers, the essential strategies for addressing violence against women in general, for preventing violence and providing services to survivors in particular.
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  12. 12
    375500

    Consolidated guideline on sexual and reproductive health and rights of women living with HIV.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2017. 144 p.

    HIV is not only driven by gender inequality, but it also entrenches gender inequality, leaving women more vulnerable to its impact. Providing sexual and reproductive health interventions for women living with HIV that are grounded in principles of gender equality and human rights can have a positive impact on their quality of life; it is also a step towards long-term improved health status and equity.
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  13. 13
    375397

    A guide to identifying and documenting best practices in family planning programmes.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for Africa

    Brazzaville, Republic of the Congo, WHO, Regional Office for Africa, 2017. 40 p.

    This guideline defines best practices, lists criteria for identifying best practices, gives examples of best practices, and provides guidance in the documentation and scaling up of best practices. It also explains how to use and disseminate this guideline.
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  14. 14
    337933

    WHO recommendations on postnatal care of the mother and newborn. 2013.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2013 Oct. [72] p.

    The postnatal period is a critical phase in the lives of mothers and newborn babies. Most maternal and infant deaths occur during this time. Yet, this is the most neglected period for the provision of quality care. WHO guidelines on postnatal care have been recently updated based on all available evidence. The guidelines focus on postnatal care of mothers and newborns in resource-limited settings in low- and middle-income countries. The guidelines address timing, number and place of postnatal contacts, and content of postnatal care for all mothers and babies during the six weeks after birth. The primary audience for these guidelines is health professionals who are responsible for providing postnatal care to women and newborns, primarily in areas where resources are limited. The guidelines are also expected to be used by policy-makers and managers of maternal and child health programmes, health facilities, and teaching institutions to set up and maintain maternity and newborn care services. The information in these guidelines is expected to be included in job aids and tools for both pre- and in-service training of health professionals to improve their knowledge, skills and performance in postnatal care. These recommendations will be regularly updated as more evidence is collated and analysed on a continuous basis, with major reviews and updates at least every five years. The next major update will be considered in 2018 under the oversight of the WHO Guidelines Review Committee.
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  15. 15
    337932

    Postnatal care for mothers and newborns: Highlights from the World Health Organization 2013 guidelines.

    Maternal and Child Survival Program; World Health Organization [WHO]

    [Geneva, Switzerland], World Health Organization [WHO], 2015 Apr. [8] p. (WHO/RHR/15.05; USAID Leader with Associates Cooperative Agreement No. GHS-A-00-08-00002-00; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. AID-OAA-A-14-00028)

    This evidence brief provides highlights and key messages from World Health Organization’s 2013 Guidelines on Postnatal Care for Mothers and Newborns. These updated guidelines address the timing and content of postnatal care for mothers with a special focus on resource-limited settings in low- and middle-income countries. This brief is intended for policy-makers, programme managers, educators and providers who care for women and newborns after birth.
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  16. 16
    335173

    Expanding contraceptive choice in West Africa: Building the capacity of local nongovernmental organizations to program holistically.

    Jackson A

    New York, New York, EngenderHealth, RESPOND Project, 2013 Jun. [8] p. (Project Brief No. 15)

    This project brief looks at how nongovernmental organizations can expand access to contraception in West Africa and specifically looks at member associations of the International Planned Parenthood Federation in Benin, Burkina Faso and Togo.
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  17. 17
    334529

    WHO / World Bank convene ministerial meeting to discuss best practices for moving forward on universal health coverage. Joint WHO / World Bank statement.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; World Bank

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2013 Feb 19. [2] p.

    Top officials from health and finance ministries from 27 countries joined other high-level health and development stakeholders at a two-day meeting this week in Geneva to discuss ways that countries are progressing towards universal health coverage. The meeting was convened jointly by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Bank and took place just weeks after the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution supporting universal health coverage. Delegates at the Geneva meeting expressed strong support for the ideas underlying universal health coverage: that everyone, irrespective of their ability to pay, should have access to the health services they need, without putting their families at financial risk. The meeting also discussed strategies to ensure an adequate supply of good quality and affordable essential medicines and technologies, noting the value of using financial incentives to promote efficiency and quality of health services. The participants agreed on the importance of improving information systems and holding governments and health care providers more accountable for delivering results. The importance of monitoring progress towards universal health coverage was also a recurrent theme, as was the important role played by researchers, civil society, and international agencies. The WHO and the World Bank are working together at global, regional and country levels, and stand by ready to help countries confront the numerous challenges that the meeting highlighted in accelerating progress toward universal health coverage. In response to country demand, the WHO and the World Bank are already developing a monitoring framework that will help countries track their countries’ progress toward universal health coverage in a way that explicitly captures the potential importance of universal health coverage in achieving better health and higher living standards for everyone. The framework will be available for consultation with countries and other partners later this year. The UN General Assembly resolution urges Member States to develop health systems that avoid significant direct payments at the point of care. It further encourages them to establish mechanisms for pooling risks to avoid catastrophic health expenditures that drive households into poverty. (Excerpts)
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  18. 18
    334252

    Handbook for national action plans on violence against women.

    United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women [UN Women]

    New York, New York, UN Women, 2012. [80] p.

    The Handbook for National Action Plans on Violence against Women brings together current knowledge on effective policy for the prevention of, and response to, violence against women, and concretely demonstrates how States have developed and implemented such policy in their own contexts. Although not a model plan itself , this publication sets out guidelines to help policy makers and advocates formulate effective plans. It is based on good practices in States’ plans and the advice of experts from different countries and regions. It first outlines the international and regional legal and policy framework which mandates States to adopt and implement National Action Plans to address violence against women. It then presents a model framework for National Action Plans on violence against women, which sets out recommendations, accompanied by explanatory commentaries and good practice examples.
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  19. 19
    334251

    Report on the online discussion on eliminating violence against women and girls -- gaps, challenges and strategic directions in prevention and multisectoral services and responses.

    Baker J

    [New York, New York], UN Women, [2012]. [32] p. (CSW 57 Online Discussion)

    Between 23 July and 7 August 2012, UN Women ran a dynamic online discussion to support preparations for the forthcoming 57th Commission on the Status of Women which brought together the views of diverse respondents on the good practices and key gaps and challenges in the prevention of and response to violence against women and girls. Participants included representatives from civil society, government organizations, research and leadership institutions and UN agencies in many countries from all regions of the world. The discussions will be taken into consideration in the development of the Secretary-General’s Reports to the Commission on the Status of Women.
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  20. 20
    334222

    Landscape for safe injection, phlebotomy, and waste management equipment. Standards, specifications, and products.

    Program for Appropriate Technology in Health [PATH]; John Snow [JSI]. Making Medical Injections Safer [MMIS]

    Boston, Massachusetts, JSI, MMIS, 2010 Jan. [82] p.

    This document provides guidelines for implementing a procurement policy for safe injection and brings together issues that countries should consider when developing and implementing the procurement aspect of a national injection safety policy. The document points out issues to consider in transitioning from policy to implementation, regulatory factors, public-sector considerations, and the need to sensitize private-sector manufacturers. It also includes a landscape of manufacturers of safe injection equipment.
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  21. 21
    333751

    Learning about how to communicate 'learning' from and within a multi-sited organisation.

    Perkins NI

    Brighton, United Kingdom, University of Sussex, Institute of Development Studies [IDS], 2011 Sep. [10] p. (IDS Practice Paper in Brief 7; ILT Brief 7)

    This paper draws on a study conducted on capturing innovation and lessons from across a ‘multi-sited’ organisation. The lessons in question were about effective social protection programmes, however the paper focuses on the general principles of learning in an international organisation spread across many countries. The study was undertaken in collaboration with UNICEF and Irish Aid. The implementing team developed an action research programme exploring how to capture, share and use findings and lessons, in an organisation like UNICEF. The paper describes the processes and limitations of studies like this in building an institutional learning environment.
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  22. 22
    332320

    Country-led monitoring and evaluation systems. Better evidence, better policies, better development results.

    Segone M

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNICEF, Regional Office for CEE/CIS, 2009. [322] p.

    This collection of articles by UNICEF discusses how to improve evidence-based decision making in developing countries through the use of monitoring and evaluation systems. While information on programmatic best practices is available, knowledge bases in developing countries still have significant gaps. This book forges the link between learning about evidence-based policymaking and the contributions that country-led monitoring and evaluation systems can make in supporting good decision making.
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  23. 23
    326314

    Introducing WHO's sexual and reproductive health guidelines and tools into national programmes. Principles and processes of adaptation and implementation.

    Church K; Kabra R; Mbizvo M

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], Department of Reproductive Health and Research, 2007. 25 p. (WHO/RHR/07.4)

    The Departments of Reproductive Health and Research (RHR) and Making Pregnancy Safer (MPS) at the World Health Organization (WHO) have developed a series of guidelines and tools to promote evidence-based practices in sexual and reproductive health within programs. The guidance developed by WHO/RHR and WHO/MPS includes: norms, standards and protocols designed to inform the development and revision of national policies and standards; programmatic guides to inform the development of sexual and reproductive health programs; tools and clinical guides designed to be used by health-care providers in clinical setting, according to evidence-based norms. The guidance covers a range of themes, including maternal and neonatal health, family planning, prevention and control of reproductive tract infections and sexually transmitted infections (RTIs/STIs) and the prevention of unsafe abortion. The various documents are based on scientific evidence and have been developed by WHO/RHR and WHO/MPS as generic global materials that are not specific to any one national context. (excerpt)
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  24. 24
    326030

    Workshop report: Appraising HIV / AIDS Prevention Curricular Materials and Teaching-Learning Resources, Geneva, Switzerland, 9-11 June 2003.

    UNESCO. International Bureau of Education

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNESCO, International Bureau of Education, 2003 Jul 14. 11 p. (IBE/2003/RP/HV/01)

    The IBE organized this workshop as part of UNESCO's common effort to make existing curriculum documents and teaching-learning materials for HIV/AIDS education easily accessible, and to identify and disseminate good practices and lessons learned, with the aim of improving the overall success of education as principal means of combating the epidemic. Three objectives have been identified for this workshop: discuss and improve the set of appraisal criteria prepared by the IBE to assess curricular materials and teaching-learning resources for HIV/AIDS prevention in schools; apply the proposed appraisal criterial to analyze concrete curriculum materials and teaching learning resources brought by the participants and identify good practices and lessons learned; formulate follow-up actions and recommendations for future collaboration among participants for identification and promotion of promising approaches and good practice. Presentations of the participants the first day and discussions on important issues and challenges that the education sector faces in designing and implementing HIV/AIDS prevention in schools provided valuable information, but also crucial questions on how to continue the work. (excerpt)
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  25. 25
    325646

    Integration of the human rights of women and the gender perspective. Violence against women. Report of the Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences, Ms. Radhika Coomaraswamy, submitted in accordance with Commission on Human Rights resolution 2002/52. Addendum 1: International, regional and national developments in the area of violence against women 1994-2003.

    Coomaraswamy R

    [New York, New York], United Nations, Economic and Social Council, 2003 Feb 27. 435 p. (E/CN.4/2003/75/Add.1)

    The present report contains a detailed review of international, regional and national developments and best practices for ways and means of combating violence against women over the period 1994-2003. The report is not fully comprehensive, some regions or countries may have been reported on in greater detail than others, reflecting the information that was available to the Special Rapporteur. In order to provide a systematic analysis of global developments, the Special Rapporteur requested information on efforts to eliminate violence against women, its causes and consequences, from Governments, specialized agencies, United Nations organs and bodies, and intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations, including women's organizations, and academics. The Special Rapporteur expresses her gratitude to all who kindly provided information, which contributed significantly in the preparation of her report. (excerpt)
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