Your search found 11 Results

  1. 1
    379388
    Peer Reviewed

    Monitoring and surveillance for multiple micronutrient supplements in pregnancy.

    Mei Z; Jefferds ME; Namaste S; Suchdev PS; Flores-Ayala RC

    Maternal and Child Nutrition. 2017 Dec 22; 1-9.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends iron-folic acid (IFA) supplementation during pregnancy to improve maternal and infant health outcomes. Multiple micronutrient (MMN) supplementation in pregnancy has been implemented in select countries and emerging evidence suggests that MMN supplementation in pregnancy may provide additional benefits compared to IFA alone. In 2015, WHO, the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), and the Micronutrient Initiative held a “Technical Consultation on MMN supplements in pregnancy: implementation considerations for successful incorporation into existing programmemes,” which included a call for indicators needed for monitoring, evaluation, and surveillance of MMN supplementation programs. Currently, global surveillance and monitoring data show that overall IFA supplementation programs suffer from low coverage and intake adherence, despite inclusion in national policies. Common barriers that limit the effectiveness of IFA-which also apply to MMN programs-include weak supply chains, low access to antenatal care services, low-quality behavior change interventions to support and motivate women, and weak or non-existent monitoring systems used for programme improvement. The causes of these barriers in a given country need careful review to resolve them. As countries heighten their focus on supplementation during pregnancy, or if they decide to initiate or transition into MMN supplementation, a priority is to identify key monitoring indicators to address these issues and support effective programs. National and global monitoring and surveillance data on IFA supplementation during pregnancy are primarily derived from cross-sectional surveys and, on a more routine basis, through health and logistics management information systems. Indicators for IFA supplementation exist; however, the new indicators for MMN supplementation need to be incorporated. We reviewed practice-based evidence, guided by the WHO/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention logic model for vitamin and mineral interventions in public health programs, and used existing manuals, published literature, country reports, and the opinion of experts, to identify monitoring, evaluation, and surveillance indicators for MMN supplementation programs. We also considered cross-cutting indicators that could be used across programme settings, as well as those specific to common delivery models, such as antenatal care services. We then described mechanisms for collecting these data, including integration within existing government monitoring systems, as well as other existing or proposed systems. Monitoring data needs at all stages of the programme lifecycle were considered, as well as the feasibility and cost of data collection. We also propose revisions to global-, national-, and subnational-surveillance indicators based on these reviews.
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  2. 2
    375323

    WASH’Nutrition: A practical guidebook on increasing nutritional impact through integration of WASH and nutrition programmes for practitioners in humanitarian and developent contexts.

    Dodos J

    Paris, France, Action Contre la Faim [ACF], 2017. 156 p.

    Undernutrition is a multi-sectoral problem with multi-sectoral solutions. By applying integrated approaches, the impact, coherence and efficiency of the action can be improved. This operational guidebook demonstrates the importance of both supplementing nutrition programmes with WASH activities and adapting WASH interventions to include nutritional considerations i.e. making them more nutrition-sensitive and impactful on nutrition. It has been developed to provide practitioners with usable information and tools so that they can design and implement effective WASH and nutrition programmes. Apart from encouraging the design of new integrated projects, the guidebook provides support for reinforcing existing integrated interventions. It does not provide a standard approach or strict recommendations, but rather ideas, examples and practical tools on how to achieve nutrition and health gains with improved WASH. Integrating WASH and nutrition interventions will always have to be adapted to specific conditions, opportunities and constrains in each context. The guidebook primarily addresses field practitioners, WASH and Nutrition programme managers working in humanitarian and development contexts, and responds to the need for more practical guidance on WASH and nutrition integration at the field level. It can also be used as a practical tool for donors and institutions (such as ministries of health) to prioritise strategic activities and funding options. (Excerpt)
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  3. 3
    372502

    Engaging men and boys in refugee settings to address sexual and gender based violence.

    Aasheim C; Buscher D; Peacock D; Ngugi L

    Johannesburg, South Africa, Sonke Gender Justice Network, [2008]. 26 p.

    UNHCR has recognized the essential role that both male staff and male persons of concern play in ending gender-based violence in its operations and that protecting women from SGBV is part of the organization’s core protection mandate. This workshop was organized to raise awareness of the need to engage men and boys, to look at successful models for such engagement, and to develop country-level strategies for strengthening the engagement of men and boys to end sexual and gender-based violence. The workshop addressed knowledge, attitudes and action and brought together UNHCR and implementing partner staff as well as refugees from ten African countries including gender practitioners and organizations already engaged in working with men and boys. A four day regional workshop was facilitated by Sonke Gender Justice Network (Sonke) and the Women’s Commission for Refugee Women and Children. (Women’s Commission), in cooperation with UNHCR, to increase and encourage the involvement of men and boys in the work against sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV). The participants consisted of multifunctional teams from nine different countries in the Great Lakes region, Eastern Africa and Southern Africa (Uganda, Burundi, Kenya, Tanzania, Zambia, Namibia, Zimbabwe, South Africa and Rwanda), a professor from St Cloud’s University and the founder of MAGE in Sierra Leone. The workshop had three main objectives; a) Awareness raising for UNHCR staff, people of concern and NGO partners on addressing masculinities. b) Skills building for UNHCR staff, people of concern and NGO partners on how to integrate masculinities into programs to address SGBV and promote gender equality. c) Development of a critical mass of trainers to undertake training on masculinities throughout the region. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    386139
    Peer Reviewed

    UNICEF Training Package for Scaling Up Skilled Community Infant and Young Child Feeding Counselors: Zimbabwe Experience.

    Dube WG; Nyadzayo TK; Ncube T; Covic NM

    Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior. 2015 May-Jun; 47(3):286-9.

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  5. 5
    334436

    HIV / AIDS white paper, World Youth Alliance.

    Grizzle M

    New York, New York, World Youth Alliance, [2012]. [25] p.

    The World Youth Alliance’s White Paper on HIV / AIDS proposes evidence-based and person-centered treatment, such as the provision of antiretroviral drugs, and prevention strategies, such as a reduction in concurrent partners and a delay in sexual debut. These strategies reflect the capacity of the person to make responsible decisions and to stop the high-risk behavior that exposes him or her to HIV. The paper ends with an evaluation of UNAIDS' harm reduction strategies and a call for UNAIDS to start emphasizing a person-centered response that reflects science and culture.
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  6. 6
    333452

    A new investment framework for the global HIV response.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2011 Oct. [10] p. (UNAIDS Issues Brief; UNAIDS Policy Document; UNAIDS/JC2244E)

    Over the past 30 years there have been tremendous gains in the global HIV response, but until now there has been only limited systematic effort to match needs with investments. The result is often a mismatch of the two, and valuable resources are stretched inefficiently across many objectives. To achieve an optimal HIV response, countries and their international partners must adopt a more strategic approach to investments. In June 2011 a policy paper was published in The Lancet (Schwartländer et al) that laid out a new framework for investment for the global HIV response. The new framework is based on existing evidence of what works in HIV prevention, treatment, care and support. It is intended to facilitate more focused and strategic use of scarce resources. Modelling of the framework’s impact shows that its implementation would avert 12.2 million new infections and 7.4 million AIDS-related deaths between 2011 and 2020. This modelling also indicates that implementation of the investment framework is highly cost-effective, with additional investment largely offset by savings in treatment costs alone, and enabling the HIV response to reach an inflection point in both investments and rates of HIV infection. (Excerpts)
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  7. 7
    347863

    Consultation on strategic information and HIV prevention among most-at-risk adolescents. 2-4 September 2009, Geneva. Consultation report.

    UNICEF; UNAIDS. Inter-Agency Task Team on HIV and Young People

    New York, New York, UNICEF, 2010. 65 p.

    The Consultation on Strategic Information and HIV Prevention among Most-at-Risk Adolescents (MARA) focused on experiences in countries where HIV infection is concentrated among men who have sex with men (MSM), injecting drug users (IDUs), and those who sell sex. The meeting facilitated the exchange of information across regions on country-level data collection regarding MARA; identified ways to use strategic information to improve HIV prevention among MARA; and suggested ways to build support for MARA programming among decision-makers.
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  8. 8
    329495
    Peer Reviewed

    AIDS and the irrational.

    Epstein H

    BMJ. British Medical Journal. 2008; 337:a2638.

    In a recent survey of HIV positive South Africans, almost half believed that tradi¬tional African medicine is more effective than antiretroviral drugs. This is upsetting news. The country has invested heavily in antiretroviral drugs, rapid HIV tests, CD4 cell counters, and condoms and is the site of many clinical trials into novel treatments and HIV prevention devices. In the midst of all this technology, why do irrational beliefs about AIDS persist? The reasons are complex. (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    322440

    Harnessing the UN system into a common approach on communication for development.

    Servaes J

    International Communication Gazette. 2007; 69(6):483-507.

    In the UN system, conflicts and contradictions seldom concern the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) as such, but rather the means of achieving them. These differences of opinion about priorities, and about how much and to whom development aid or assistance should be directed, could be explained by analysing the ontological, epistemological and methodological assumptions underpinning the general perspectives in the communication for development (C4D) field. Theoretical changes in the perspective on development communication (modernization, dependency, multiplicity) have also reached the level of policy-makers. As a result, different methodologies and terminologies have evolved, which often make it difficult for agencies, even though they share a common commitment to the overall goals of development communication, to identify common ground, arrive at a full understanding of each other's objectives, or to cooperate effectively in operational projects. Consequently, it is difficult for development organizations in general and UN agencies in particular to reach a common approach and strategy. (author's)
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  10. 10
    320935

    UNESCO and HIV / AIDS: ten lessons.

    Hernes G

    In: The HIV challenge to education: a collection of essays, edited by Carol Coombe. Paris, France, UNESCO, International Institute for Educational Planning, 2004. 253-263. (Education in the Context of HIV / AIDS)

    Twenty years after the identification of AIDS, some 60 million people have been infected by HIV, a number corresponding to the entire population of France, the United Kingdom or Thailand. Those who have died equal the population of Norway, Sweden, Finland and Denmark combined. Those currently infected - more than 40 million - number more than the entire population of Canada. The number of children thought to be orphaned by HIV/AIDS - some 14 million - is already more than the total population of Ecuador. Over the coming decade their numbers may rise to a staggering 50 million worldwide. In other words, the extent of this pandemic is unprecedented in human history. And the worst is yet to come, for many millions more will be infected, many millions more will die, many millions more will be orphaned. On September 11 2001, more than 3,000 people died in the New York bombings. Every day, around the world, HIV infects at least five times that number. But it is not only individuals who are at risk. The social fabric of whole communities, societies and cultures is threatened. The disease is certain to be a scourge throughout our lifetime. (excerpt)
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  11. 11
    318642

    Ghana: the AIDS Response project (GARFUND).

    World Bank. Africa Region. Operations Results and Learning Unit

    Findings Infobriefs. 2007 May; (136):[3] p.

    The specific objectives of this project - financed through an IDA credit of $28.7 million (2002-05) - were to : (i) provide resources that would enable the government to implement a balanced, diversified multi-sector response, engaging all relevant government sectors, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and grassroots initiatives; (ii) to expand contributions made by the Ministry of Health ( MOH ) engage civil society in the fight against AIDS; and (iii) finance eligible activities conducted by civil society organizations, including NGOs, community-based organizations (CBOs), faith-based organizations (FBOs), trade and professional associations, associations of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHAs), districts, and line ministries to ensure a rapid multisector scaling-up of HIV prevention and care activities in all regions and at all administrative levels. (excerpt)
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