Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 22 Results

  1. 1
    049191

    Report of the European Region on Immunization Activities. (Global Advisory Group EPI, Alexandria, October 1984). WHO/Expanded Immunization Programme and the European Immunization Targets in the Framework of HFA 2000.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Expanded Programme on Immunization [EPI]. European Region on Immunization Activities

    [Unpublished] 1984. Presented at the EPI Global Advisory Group Meeting, Alexandria, Egypt, 21-25 October 1984. 3 p. (EPI/GAG/84/WP.4)

    Current reported levels of morbidity and mortality from measles, poliomyelitis, diphtheria, tetanus, and tuberculosis in most countries in the European Region are at or near record low levels. However, several factors threaten successful achievement of the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) goal of making immunization services available to all the world's children by the year 2000, including changes in public attitudes as diseases pose less of a visible threat, declining acceptance rates for certain immunizations, variations in vaccines included in the EPI, and incomplete information on the incidence of diseases preventable by immunization and on vaccination coverage rates. To launch a more coordinated approach to the EPI goals, a 2nd Conference on Immunization Policies in Europe is scheduled to be held in Czechoslovakia. Its objectives are: 1) to review and analyze the current situation, including achievements and gaps, in immunization programs in individual countries and the European Region as a whole; 2) to determine the necessary actions to eliminate indigenous measles, poliomyelitis, neonatal tetanus, congenital rubella, and diphtheria; 3) to consider appropriate policies regarding the control by immunization of other diseases of public health importance; 4) to strengthen existing or establish additional systems for effective monitoring and surveillance; 5) to formulate actions necessary to improve national vaccine programs in order to achieve national and regional targets; 6) to reinforce the commitment of Member Countries to the goals and activities of the EPI; and 7) to define appropriate activities for the Regional Office for Europe of the World Health Organization to achieve coordinated action.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    040626

    Report of the Expanded Programme on Immunization Global Advisory Group Meeting, 20-23 October 1980, Geneva.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Expanded Programme on Immunization [EPI]. Global Advisory Group

    [Unpublished] 1980. 39 p. (EPI/GEN/80/1)

    This report of the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) Global Advisory Group Meeting, held during October 1980 in Geneva, Switzerland, presents conclusions and recommendations, global and regional overviews, working group discussions, and outlines global advisory group activities for 1981. In terms of global strategies, the EPI confronts dual challenges: to reduce morbidity and mortality by providing immunizations for all children of the world by 1990; and to develop immunization services in consonance with other health services, particularly those directed towards mothers and children, so they can mutually strengthen the approach of primary health care. Increased resources are needed to support the expansion of immunization services and to establish them as permanent elements of the health care system. The Global Advisory Group affirms the importance of setting quantified targets as a basic principle of management and endorses the principle of setting targets for the reduction of the EPI diseases at national, regional, and global levels. The primary focus for the World Health Organization (WHO) in promoting the EPI continues to be the support to national program implementation in all its aspects. The Group reviewed current EPI immunization schedules and policies and concurs in the following: for measles, for most developing countries, the available data support the current recommendations of administering a single dose of vaccine to children as early as possible after the child reaches the age of 9 months; for DPT, children in the 1st year of life should receive a series of 3 DPT doses administered at intervals of at least 1 month; for tetanus toxoid, the control of neonatal and puerperal tetanus by immunizing women of childbearing age, particularly pregnant women, is endorsed; for poliomyelitis, the Group endorses the "Outline for WHO's Research on Poliomyelitis, Polioviruses and Poliomyelitis Vaccines" prepared by the WHO Working Group convened in October 1980, i.e., for oral (live) vaccines, a 3-dose schedule, administered simultaneously with DPT vaccine, is recommended again; and for BCG concurred with the Advisory Committee on Medical Research conclusion that the use of BCG as an anti-tuberculosis measure within the EPI should be continued as at present. The implementation of programs at the national level remains the foremost priority for the EPI. National commitment, evidenced in part by the designation of a national manager, the establishment of realistic targets, and the allocation of adequate resources, is essential if programs are to succeed.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    038952

    Vaccination against tuberculosis. Report of an ICMR/WHO Scientific Group.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Scientific Group on Vaccines Against Tuberculosis

    WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES. 1980; (651):1-19.

    This document reports the discussions of a Scientific Group on Vaccination Against Tuberculosis, cosponsored by the Indian Council of Medical Research and the World Health Organization (WHO), that met in 1980. The objectives of the meeting were to review research on Bacillus Calmete-Guerin (BCG) vaccination, assess the present state of knowledge, and determine how to advance this knowledge. Particular emphasis is placed in this document on the trial of BCG vaccines in South India. In this trial, the tuberculin sensitivity induced by BCG vaccination was highly satisfactory at 2 1/2 months but had waned sharply by 2 1/2 years and the 7 1/2-year follow up revealed a high incidence of tuberculous infection in the study population. It is suggested that the protective effect of BCG may depend on epidemiologic, environmental, and immunologic factors affecting both the host and the infective agent. Studies to test certain hypotheses (e.g., the immune response of the study population was unusual, the vaccines were inadequate, the south Indian variant of M tuberculosis acted as an attenuating immunizing agent, and mycobacteria other than M tuberculosis may have partially immunized the study population) are recommended. A detailed analysis should be made when results from the 10-year follow up of the south Indian study population are available.
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    273073

    Report of the third meeting of the Scientific Working Group on Bacterial Enteric Infections: Microbiology, Epidemiology, Immunology, and Vaccine Development.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Programme for Control of Diarrhoeal Diseases

    [Unpublished] 1984. 17 p. (WHO/CDD/BEI/84.5)

    The scientific topic discussed in detail by the Scientific Working Group (SWG) was recent research advances in the field of cholera. The SWG reviewed new knowlenge in areas such as epidemiology and ecology, phage-typing, pathogenesis, immunization, and related pathogens, and made recommendations for future research. The Diarrhoeal Disease Control Pragramme was continuing to emphasize the implementation of oral rehydration therapy as a means of reducing diarrheal mortality, and research aimed at an improved case-management strategy. The Steering Committee granted support to a number of projects aimed at clarifying the epidemiology of diarrhea and the pathogenesis of bacterial agents of acute diarrhea. Support was provided by the Steering Committee to projects aimed at, or closely related to the development of new vaccines against typhoid fever, cholera, and Shigella dysentery.
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    150798

    Meningococcal immunisation in Ghana [letter]

    McDamien D; Boelaert M; Van Damme W; Van der Stuyft P

    Lancet. 2000 Jun 24; 355(9222):2252.

    This is a brief critique on the conclusion drawn by Christopher Woods and colleagues that the WHO’s threshold-based meningitis control strategy is the best strategy. The critics outline the reasons for the unfeasibility of the WHO strategy in meeting the demands of meningitis vaccination. Moreover, they stress their concerns over the delays in vaccination coverage. The delays were due, between the crossing of the threshold and the declarations of the epidemic, to weaknesses in the surveillance system. The paper further implicates that support should be given to all initiatives that strive for universal access to essential drugs while promoting research for better and affordable meningococcal vaccines.
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    082269

    New developments in vaccinology.

    Andre FE

    ANALES ESPANOLES DE PEDIATRIA. 1992 Jun; 36 Suppl 48:189.

    New vaccine developments will reflect achievements of the World Health Organization's (WHO) Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI), as well as resistance from the public toward increasing numbers of vaccines. WHO's EPI program has concentrated on tuberculosis, diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, polio, and measles. 35 countries are attempting to control hepatitis B with universal vaccination. Now some countries are also recommending vaccination against Haemophilus influenza, mumps, and rubella. The complexity of multiple injections has prompted new research on acellular vaccines for pertussis, hepatitis A and B, varicella, and malaria. Combined vaccines and new adjuvants are also targets of intense research. Vaccines are a priority, because they are among the most cost-effective of medical interventions.
    Add to my documents.
  7. 7
    070902

    EPI target diseases: measles, tetanus, polio, tuberculosis, pertussis, and diphtheria.

    Rodrigues LC

    In: Disease and mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa, edited by Richard G. Feachem, Dean T. Jamison. Oxford, England, Oxford University Press, 1991. 173-89.

    In Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), 1% of all children die of neonatal tetanus, 9% of measles, 3% of tuberculosis (TB), and 4% of pertussis. Further, .6% acquire paralytic polio. 20% of the .6% who acquire diphtheria die. Even though vaccination can control these diseases, only 20% of children in SSA receive the complete course of vaccination against the 6 diseases targeted by WHO's Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI). But high vaccine coverage is not always a cure-all. For example, in the Gambia coverage is high but high mortality levels persist. Of the EPI diseases, measles is the greatest threat since it kills 2 million people annually in developing countries. Measles related mortality is highest in the 9 months following the disease. Even though tetanus is a major cause of death in neonates, tetanus also kills adults such as those that work with the land. Further the tetanus vaccination is effective in adults, but no adult program operates in SSA. Trained midwives reduce neonatal tetanus mortality by 76.6% and vaccination of pregnant mothers with 2 doses of tetanus toxoid reduces mortality 93.3%. Lameness surveys in SSA countries show that, contrary to earlier beliefs, paralytic polio is quite common (range 0.7-13.2). Administration of the oral polio vaccine and improved sanitation are responsible for a real fall in polio cases in the Gambia, the Ivory Coast, and Cameroon. TB was introduced into SSA in the 19th century. It mainly occurs in adults. The estimated life long risk of developing smear positive TB in SSA is 63. The case fatality rate of pertussis in the 1st year of life is high (3.2) and infants do no acquire maternal immunity against it, so the best control measures are early vaccination and identifying secondary cases among young siblings. Of the EPI diseases, scientists know the least about diphtheria in SSA. Its case fatality rate is high (11-38%) yet it is treatable. Primary problems of adequate vaccination coverage for the EPI diseases are managerial problems rather than technological.
    Add to my documents.
  8. 8
    070486

    Disinfection and sterilization of immunization equipment: a review.

    Fields R; Tsu V

    [Unpublished] 1987 Nov. [2], 19 p.

    Immunizations often involve injecting a needle into the skin and, if health personnel do not take appropriate precautions, they can transmit pathogens such as hepatitis B and HIV. The most difficult form of microbe to destroy is bacteria encased in spores, e.g. Clostridium tetani. The most common method in developing countries to disinfect immunization equipment is to boil them nonstop for 20 minutes. Based on some studies, key researchers believe that exposure to 100 degrees Celsius water for several minutes can actually destroy or inactivate essentially all vegetative bacteria, viruses, protozoa, yeasts, and molds. Yet there is no agreement on the amount of time and temperature needed to inactivate the hepatitis B virus since some evidence indicates that it is highly resistant to heat (60 minutes needed) whereas other evidence indicates it is not very resistant (2 minutes). Many researchers believe HIV can be inactivated at 80 degrees Celsius. Health workers must clean immunization equipment before boiling since organic materials and oils on the equipment prevent heat penetration and protect microbes. Further they should submerge all equipment at the same time and make sure that the water is at full boil continuously for the entire specified time. Indeed health workers in developing countries should adhere to the procedure listed in the WHO/EPI/UNICEF pamphlet entitled How to Boil Needles and Syringes Properly. Steam is by far the best method to sterilize immunization equipment, however. WHO/EPI is trying to introduce portable special pressure cookers which can attain a temperature of 121 degrees Celcius to act as autoclaves for needles and syringes. WHO/EPI and UNICEF are exploring disposable syringes as another means of preventing disease transmission. Researchers are also working on developing vaccines that do not require injection such as the oral polio vaccine.
    Add to my documents.
  9. 9
    057629

    Vaccination strategies in developing countries.

    Poore P

    VACCINE. 1988 Oct; 6(5):393-8.

    In developing countries, where economic development is lacking and literacy rates are low, priority must be given to primary health care and to the establishmend of sustainable health care delivery systems. The World Health Organization's Expanded Program of Immunization was designed with the goal of immunizing all children against measles, pertussis, tetanus, poliomyelitis, tuberculosis, and diphtheria by 1990. A second function of the immunization program is to establish a health care delivery system. Today 50% of infants receive 3 doses of diptheria/pertussis/tetanus and polio vaccines, and 70% receive at least 1 dose. Measles kills 2 million children every year. The standard strain of attenuated vaccine is given at 9 months, and 1 dose protects 95% of children for life. Tetanus kills 800,000 infants every year. The vaccine must be refrigerated, and 2 doses are essential. Tuberculosis kills 2 million children under 5 every year. The attenuated BCG vaccine should be given at birth, and a single dose confers some protection. Diphtheria is most common among poor, urban children in termperate climates, and 3 doses of toxoid at monthly intervals are recommended. Poliomyelitis paralyzes 250,000 children a year. 4 doses of live attenuated Sabin vaccine are recommended. The vaccine is very sensitive to heat. Other vaccines in use or being developed include yellow fever, meningococcus, Japanese B encephalitis, rubella, hepatitis B, cholera, rotavirus, pneumonococcus, and Haemophilus influezae. 2 problems that confront the delivery of health services, including immunization, are lack of funds and lack of access to susceptible populations. Approaches to the lack of funds problem include fee for service, taxation, beter management of existing resources, reallocation of health resources, and increased funding from donor nations. Approaches to the problem of access include vaccination whenever children come into contact with a health facility for any reason, channeling by members of the community, involvement of traditional healers and birth attendants, outreach services, mass campaigns, pulse technics, and financial incentives.
    Add to my documents.
  10. 10
    051840

    Undoing the curse of neo-natal tetanus.

    Robbins K

    CHILD SURVIVAL ACTION NEWS. 1988 Apr; (9):1-2.

    Present thinking regarding the control of neonatal tetanus (NT) suggests that the accepted protocol in the past, i.e., immunizing pregnant women with tetanus toxoid (TT) during antenatal care, is not sufficient in countries where antenatal care may be unavailable. Current control strategies, experts, and official World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations now indicate that efforts should reach beyond immunization of pregnant women and the training of traditional birth attendants in hygienic cord care practice to immunization of all women of childbearing age. Babies continue to die form NT because it is so difficult to reach women during pregnancy for immunization. Lack of commitment to expanding immunization programs as Who recommends stems in part from failure at both national and local levels to acknowledge the extent of the neonatal tetanus problem. NT is vastly underreported for several reasons: cultural practices often include the seclusion of women and their babies during the period after birth; people in developing countries have a fatalistic attitude because so many children die within the 1st year of life; newborns are rarely taken to health centers for treatment; health workers may fail to report NT for fear that their superiors will blame them for failure to immunize or for poor care of the umbilical cord; Western medicine and research has a curative rather than a preventive focus; and gathering information on NT by asking mothers to recall deaths of newborns with symptoms of NT is difficult because many women are ashamed or otherwise unwilling to report the event. The WHO believes that conventional reporting systems in developing countries identify only 2-4% of actual NT cases. Without sound documentation of the problem, it is difficult to gain financial and political commitment to eradicating NT. The VIII International Conference on Tetanus that occurred in Leningrad during 1987 outlined WHO's recommendation for a mixed strategy to control and eliminate tetanus: immunize all women of childbearing age, with special emphasis on pregnant women and women known to belong to high risk groups; assure hygienic delivery and umbilical care through training and supervision of birth attendants; and investigate cases to determine what action could have prevented them.
    Add to my documents.
  11. 11
    052107

    Diarrheal diseases morbidity, mortality and treatment rates in Bahrain (1986).

    Al-Khateeb M

    [Unpublished] 1988. Presented at the 13th World Conference on Health Education, Houston, Texas, August 28 - September 2, 1988. 60 p.

    This study is the report of a 1986 baseline survey, guided by the World Health Organization's "Guidelines for a Sample Survey of Diarrheal Diseases Morbidity, Mortality, and Treatment Rate." The survey method was the Expanded Program on Immunization 30 cluster 2-stage method. Baseline data were also gathered on the status of immunization against diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, poliomyelitis, measles, and tuberculosis. Primary health care services in Bahrain are generally good. The archipelago of 670 sq km has a population of 417,210 including 55,000 children under 5. There are 18 health centers and 480 physicians or 1 physician for every 860 people. All inhabitants of a catchment area live within 5 km of a health center, and medical care is free. Diarrhea is due to a number of different organisms, including typhoid, paratyphoid, salmonellosis, Escherichia coli, rotaviruses, and giardiasis, but there has been no cholera in Bahrain since 1979. The national diarrheal diseases control program, drafted by the World Health Organization in 1985, emphasized the use of oral rehydration therapy, breast feeding, and feeding during diarrhea. No vaccinations are compulsory in Bahrain, but immunization coverage has been reported annually since 1981, and vaccinations are in line with the World Health Organization's criteria. Diphtheria-Typhoid-Paratyphoid vaccinations were 1st given in Bahrain in 1957; polio vaccination began in 1958 with Salk vaccine and in 1962 with the Sabin vaccine. Measles vaccination began in 1974. BCG vaccination has been given to children entering school since 1972. All health centers in the country offer vaccination services. Vaccines are stored under refrigeration, and the central supply is at the Public Health Directorate. Adverse effects of vaccinations are monitored. The 1986 diarrheal diseases survey, using the 30 cluster method, looked at a sample of 4114 children under 5 from 2515 households. 378 (9.2%) of the children suffered from diarrhea, and 200 (52.9%) were treated with oral rehydration salts. The under-5 diarrheal mortality rate was .97/1000. The estimated number of episodes of diarrhea per child per year is 2.4, with a high of 8.7 episodes in the Northern Region and a low of 1.2 episodes in the Muharraq Region. Vaccination coverage of children under 2 for other diseases was found to be 96.5% for diphtheria, paratyphoid, and typhoid; 95% for polio; 82.5% for measles; and 59.8% for the trivalent mumps, measles and rubella vaccine. 96.4% of all vaccinations were given in government hospitals. 98.7% of mothers have been examined during pregnancy, and 98.9% of all deliveries are in hospitals. It is recommended that a health education campaign be concentrated on diarrhea, breast feeding, feeding during diarrhea, and hygiene; that both medical staff and mothers be trained in the use of oral rehydration salts; that they should also be informed of the adverse effects of treating diarrhea with antibiotics; that a system for reporting cases of diarrhea be developed; that health education campaigns emphasize the importance of receiving booster doses of vaccines and of vaccination against measles; that staff at health centers adjust their schedules so as to be available for immunizations as needed; and that this survey be repeated every 2 years.
    Add to my documents.
  12. 12
    049219

    Yellow fever vaccination in the Americas.

    BULLETIN OF THE PAN AMERICAN HEALTH ORGANIZATION. 1984; 18(2):188-92.

    Outbreaks of yellow fever in recent years in the Americas have prompted concern about the possible urbanization of jungle fever. Vaccination, using the 17D strain of yellow fever virus, provides an effective, practical method of large scale protection against the disease. Because yellow fever can reappear in certain areas after a 2-year dormancy period, some countries maintain routine vaccination programs in areas where jungle yellow fever is endemic. The size of the endemic area (approximately half of South America), transportation and communication difficulties, and the inability to ensure a reliable cold chain are problems facing these programs. In addition, the problem of reaching dispersed and isolated populations has been addressed by the use of mobile teams, radio monitoring, and educational methods. During yellow fever outbreaks, many countries institute massive vaccination campaigns, targeted at temporary workers and migrants. Because epidemics in South America may involve extensive areas, these campaigns may not effectively address the problem. The ped-o-jet injector method, used in Brazil and Colombia, should be used in outbreak situations, as it is effective for large-scale vaccination. Vaccine by needle, suggested for maintenance programs, should be administered to those above 1 year of age. An efficient monitoring method to avoid revaccination, and to assess immunity, should be developed. The 17D strain produces seroconversion in 95% of recipients, and most is prepared in Brazil and Colombia. But, problems with storage methods, instability in seed lots, and difficulties in large-scale production were identified in 1981 by the Pan American Health Organization and WHO. The group recommended modernization of current production techniques and further research to develop a vaccine that could be produced in cell cultures. Brazil and Colombia have acted on these recommendations, modernizing vaccine production and researching thermostabilizing media for yellow fever vaccine.
    Add to my documents.
  13. 13
    046752
    Peer Reviewed

    Developments in pertussis vaccines: memorandum from a WHO meeting.

    Griffiths E; Kreeftenberg JG

    BULLETIN OF THE WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION. 1985; 63(2):241-8.

    The WHO memorandum outlines the present situation regarding pertussis vaccines, discusses ways to evaluate candidate vaccines, and identifies future research needs. Most existing whooping cough vaccines are whole-cell vaccines, combined with diphtheria and tetanus toxoid adsorbed on an aluminum or calcium carrier. As whole bacterial cells, they contain a complex array of at least 7 toxins and antigens, and display a narrow margin between potency and toxicity. The Japanese introduced an acellular vaccine, admittedly sometimes less potent, called the Precipitated Purified Pertussis Vaccine, in 1981. This material contains far less bacterial mass, notably less endotoxin, and consequently produces less fever, erythema and induration. WHO has not yet established minimum requirements for standardization; even the mouse potency assay may not be suitable. There are techniques, however, which will measure amounts of component antigens and toxicity. Conflicting results on assays of potency and immunogenicity will have to be resolved. Besides the obvious need for large clinical trials of defined vaccines, a whole range of research needs were suggested, from genetic studies of the organism to specific details of the host response. It is generally agreed that a less reactogenic and more effective pertussis vaccine is needed and feasible.
    Add to my documents.
  14. 14
    041353

    Global overview: the Expanded Programme on Immunization, Cartagena, Colombia, 14-16 October 1985.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Expanded Programme on Immunization [EPI]

    [Unpublished] 1985. 15 p.

    This paper reviews the development of the global Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) initiative, reports on program progress since the 1984 EPI conference, and identifies actions needed to meet the goal of providing immunization services to all children of the world by 1990. The central EPI strategy to date has been to deliver immunization in consonance with other health services, particularly those aimed at mothers and children. The long-term goal of such efforts is to strengthen the health infrastructure so as to ensure the continuous provision of immunization and other primary health care services. Simply by reinforcing existing health services, a coverage level of 60-70% will be achieved in developing countries by 1990. If universal coverage is to be achieved, external funds will have to be provided to meet operational costs and train national managers. Acceleration of existing efforts constitutes the main EPI priority at present. Specific areas suggested for immediate action include provision of information about immunization at every health contact; a reduction in the drop-out rates between 1st and last immunization; increased attention to the control of measles, poliomyelitis, and neonatal tetanus; improved immunization services to the disadvantaged in urban areas; and, where appropriate, acceleration of the EPI through approaches such as national immunization days. Ongoing actions that need to be pursued include strengthening disease surveillance and outbreak control, reinforcing training and supervision, and pursuing applied research and development. Overall, management capacity within national programs remains the most severe constraint for the EPI.
    Add to my documents.
  15. 15
    270489

    Local Area Monitoring (LAM).

    Kirsch TD

    WORLD HEALTH STATISTICS QUARTERLY. RAPPORT TRIMESTRIEL DE STATISTIQUES SANITAIRES MONDIALES. 1988; 41(1):19-25.

    Routine surveillance of the incidence of vaccine-preventable diseases has not proved sensitive enough to demonstrate the impact of the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) in many countries. In order to document progress since the start of the EPI in 1979, data are needed for several years prior to that. In most developing countries these can be found only in major cities or large hospitals. Therefore a system of sentinel surveillance, the Local Area Monitoring Project (LAM), is being set up in selected institutions in the major cities of the developing world. The primary goal of the LAM project is to provide disease-incidence data of sufficient quality to evaluate more fully the global impact of the EPI on the 6 target diseases--diptheria, pertusis, tetanus, poliomyelitis, measles, and tuberculosis. The goal is to include the major city of each of the 25 largest developing countries, with a total population of 115 million. These 25 countries together account for 85% of all births in the developing world. The program and coverage information is used to assess the impact of individual EPI programs on disease trends. Preliminary analysis of the 12 cities with the best data suggests that the impact of the EPI on the incidence of the target diseases has been greater than previously shown by the routine system. The LAM information is useful for global and regional analysis of program impact, but for the countries themselves its utility may be even greater. It is hoped that the project will help to improve a country's surveillance system by encouraging the use of sentinel reporting as a means of supplementing routine data. The information on the impact of the EPI may further increase political and public support for a program. (Summaries in ENG, FRE)
    Add to my documents.
  16. 16
    046906

    The last wild virus.

    Goodfield J

    In: Quest for the killers, [by] June Goodfield. Boston, Massachusetts, Birkhauser, 1985. 191-244. (Pro Scientia Viva Title)

    This article relates the final phase of the campaign to eradicate smallpox from Bangladesh in the early 1970s under the leadership of Donald Henderson. The article is based on informal interviews with many of the participants in this campaign who shared their recollections of the drama and problems of these years. Bangladesh was the last country in the world to be free of smallpox. In retrospect, those involved in the campaign agreed that an unfortunate defect of the campaign was that the rapid importation of international advisors did not allow the slow build-up of national staffs. If was not a developmental effort, and organizers were forced to initiate activities that could not be sustained. On the other hand, the campaign's success achieved a number of very important ends over and above the eradication of a disease. It particularly boosted the authority of health ministries in Bangladesh and contributed to the society's understanding of disease control. The episodes in this campaign are a moving testimony to the power of international cooperation.
    Add to my documents.
  17. 17
    040403

    [Experience with the expanded WHO program on immunization against tetanus] Opyt rasshirennoi programmy VOZ po immunizatsii protiv stolbniaka.

    Litvinov SK; Lobanov AV

    ZHURNAL MIKROBIOLOGII, EPIDEMIOLOGII I IMMUNOBIOLOGII. 1985 Nov; (11):97-103.

    According to (WHO) statistics, over 1 million infants in the developing countries die each year from tetanus. The estimated annual occurrence of tetanus in the 3rd World exceeds 2.5 million cases, including approximately 1.3 million newborn infants. In 1974, WHO began an expanded program for the systematic immunization of infants against tetanus and certain other diseases. The program uses 2 approaches for preventing tetanus: 1) immunization of infants under 1 year of age with the AKDS vaccine; and 2) immunization of pregnant women or, if possible, all women, with tetanus anatoxin. The 2nd approach is more effective, especially when 2 doses of tetanus anatoxin are administered within a minimum interval of 4 weeks. The anatoxin has no harmful effects on the fetus and can be used during any stage of pregnancy. The program strives to reduce infant mortality caused by tetanus to less than 1 case in 1000 by 1990, and to 0 by 2000. To attain these goals, systematic immunization should be combined with drastic improvements in delivery techniques and hygiene in developing countries. Specialized surveys indicate that initial steps toward implementation of the program resulted in a significant reduction of infant mortality caused by tetanus. Experience with the expanded WHO program shows that elimination of tetanus in infants is a realistic and attainable goal.
    Add to my documents.
  18. 18
    039060

    [Expanded Programme on Immunization: Global Advisory Group] Programme Elargi de Vaccination: Groupe consultatif mondial.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Weekly Epidemiological Record / Releve Epidemiologique Hebdomadaire. 1984 Mar 23; 59(12):85-9.

    In addition to the conclusions and recommendations reached at the 6th meeting of the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) Global Advisory Group and summarized in this report, the Group reviewed at length the status of the program in the Western Pacific Region and made a series of recommendations specifically directed to activities in the Region. Of particular significance for the operational progress of the global program are the recommendations concerning "Administration of EPI Vaccines," which were subsequently endorsed by the Precongress workshop on Immunization held before the XVIIth International Congress of Pediatrics in Manila in November 1983. These recommendations are not listed here. In his report to the World Health Assembly in 1982, the Director-General summarized the major problems which threaten the success of efforts to achieve the World Health Organization (WHO) goal of reducing morbidity and mortality by providing immunization for all children of the world by 1990. The 5-Point Action Program adopted at that time remains a relevant guide for countries and for WHO as they work to resolve those problems. The EPI is concerned about the prevention of the target diseases, not merely with the administration of vaccine. In addition to working toward increases in immunization coverage, the EPI must assure the strenghtening of surveillance systems so that the magnitude of the health problem represented by the target diseases is known at the community, district, regional, and national levels; immunization strategies are continuously adapted in order to reach groups at highest risk; and the target diseases are reduced to a minimum. The development of surveillance systems is one of the priorities in the development of effective primary health care services. Disease surveillance in its various forms should be used at all management levels for monitoring immunization programs performance and for measuring program impact. Specific recommendations regarding disease surveillance to be undertaken at global and regional levels and at the national level are listed. The results of more than 100 lameness surveys conducted in 25 developing countries confirm that paralytic poliomyelitis constitutes an important public health problem in any area in which the disease is endemic. In most programs, initial emphasis should be placed on the develpment of sentinel surveillance sites to monitor disease incidence trends. Some progress has been made in acting on the recommendations made at the meeting on the prevention of neonatal tetanus held in Lahore in 1982, but intensification of activities is required. In many developing countries, the surveillance and control of diphtheria must be improved. All aspects of progress and problems in the global program are reflected at least somewhere in the Western Pacific Region, and most of the findings and recommendations generally are valid beyond the regional boundaries.
    Add to my documents.
  19. 19
    039579

    Neonatal tetanus mortality: the magnitude of the problem and prospects for its control.

    Hadjian A

    In: Medical education in the field of primary maternal child health care [edited by] M.M. Fayad, M.I. Abdalla, Ibrahim I. Ibrahim, Mohamed A. Bayad. [Cairo, Egypt, Cairo University, Faculty of Medicine, Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 1984]. 421-34.

    This paper begins by stating that the mortality from neonatal tetanus has been peculiarly underestimated until recently, and discusses why this has been the case. The availability of a methodology for retrospective surveys and undertaking of such surveys in recent years has thrown much light on the subject. The results of these surveys from 15 countries are presented in tabular form. It is apparent that at present between 500,000 and 1 million newborn infants a year succumb to tetanus. The prospects for control, using the combined approach of improved maternity care and maternal immunization, are discussed, and an appropriate schedule of immunization suggested. The prospects for control are good wherever there is realization of the magnitude of the problem plus reasonable access to even quite basic primary health care. Some activities of WHO in this field are briefly described. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  20. 20
    039075

    [Expanded Programme on Immunization: stability of freeze dried measles vaccine] Programme Elargi de Vaccination: stabilite du vaccin antirougeoleux lyophilise.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Weekly Epidemiological Record / Releve Epidemiologique Hebdomadaire. 1981 Jun 12; 56(23):177-9.

    This report brings up to date those data summarized previously regarding the stability of freeze-dried measles vaccine and is based on information obtained from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. The World Health Organization (WHO) intends to establish a requirement for the stability of freeze-dried measles vaccine, and a draft of such a requirement is represented along with an analysis of how such a requirement would influence WHO acceptance of the vaccine included in this report. A plaque assay method was used to determine the potency of measles vaccine which had been stored in a freeze-dried state at 37 degrees Centigrade for varying intervals. Vaccine containers were exposed at 37 degrees Centigrade in a water bath and duplicate samples transferred to -70 degrees Centigrade at intervals ranging from 1 to 28 days. The residual infectious virus was determined by the plaque assay method in parallel with vaccine that had not been incubated. The results from 16 patches produced by 9 manufacturers are summarized in a table, which includes recent data a well as the results from the previous report. 2 criteria of stability are included: the number of days required for the live virus titer to drop to an acceptable minimum level when stored at 37 degrees Centigrade (Criterion 1); and the loss of live virus titer when stored for 7 days at 37 degrees Centigrade (Criterion 2). Neither criterion is sufficient on its own. A quite unstable vaccine might still have the required potency after being stored for a week at 37 degrees Centigrade if the vaccine had a high virus titer initially. Yet, a product with satisfactory stability might still fail the potency requirement if its initial virus titer was borderline. A figure shows how the vaccines would be rated according to the proposed requirements. The proposed requirement for the stability of freeze-dried measles vaccine will be presented to the Expert Committee on Biological Standardization during its meeting in September 1981. If accepted, it would become effective by March 1982.
    Add to my documents.
  21. 21
    034521
    Peer Reviewed

    Strategy for rapid elimination and continuing control of poliomyelitis and other vaccine preventable diseases of children in developing countries.

    Sabin AB

    BMJ. British Medical Journal. 1986 Feb 22; 292(6519):531-3.

    Estimates of a recent yearly incidence of 400,000 cases of paralytic poliomyelitis, 2.5 million deaths from measles and its complications, over 1 million deaths from neonatal tetanus, and 735,000 deaths from pertussis in Asia, Africa, and Latin America now pose a greater challenge for new action than did the worldwide eradication of smallpox several years ago. By virtue of the conditions obtaining in the developing countries mere expansion or acceleration of what is being done now -- even with modifications that may achieve a temporary increase in vaccine coverage -- cannot achieve the desired rapid elimination and continuing control of these diseases. A new strategy -- namely, bringing the vaccine to the people during annual national days of vaccination -- has already been used successfully in some small and large developing countries of Latin America for the rapid elimination and continuing control of polio. This strategy could be adapted to include vaccination against measles, pertussis, and neonatal tetanus by additional training of community volunteers in the large auxiliary health armies that work with the existing health services each year. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  22. 22
    031722

    Neonatal tetanus--a brief global review.

    Cook R

    In: The control of neonatal tetanus in India, edited by Indra Bhargava [and] Jotna Sokhey. New Delhi, India, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, 1983. 16-23.

    Neonatal tetanus is relatively preventable either by the immunization of pregnant women or hygienic care of the umbilical stump. Nonetheless, the medical profession tends to place great emphasis on its treatment than prevention, and the global magnitude of the problem remains largely unknown. In many countries, few cases of neonatal tetanus reach the hospitals and the usual notification system shows only a fraction of total mortality from this disease; thus, retrospective surveys are regarded as the most practical way to arrive at reasonably accurate estimates of disease incidence. Results of these surveys suggest that between 500,000 and 1 million deaths from neonatal tetanus occur each year in the developing world (excluding China). Trials have indicated the effectiveness of a combined approach to neonatal tetanus including improved maternity care (especially through training traditional birth attendants) and immunization of future mothers with 2 doses of tetanus toxoid. The basic prerequisites for effective control seem to be 1) a primary health care network accessible to the majority of the population and 2) an awareness of the magnitude of the problem. Every opportunity should be taken to immunize women in the childbearing period of life; many pregnant women do not take advantage of prenatal care. The World Health Organization (WHO) has been involved in the prevention of neonatal tetanus since the late 1960s. To achieve its goal of virtually eliminating neonatal tetanus by the year 2000, WHO plans to 1) encourage further retrospective surveys, especially in areas where the scope of the problem is unknown, and 2) support the demonstration of a combined approach (improved maternity care and immunization) in areas with populations over 250,000.
    Add to my documents.