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Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    340711

    Guideline: Managing possible serious bacterial infection in young infants when referral is not feasible.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2015. [52] p.

    This guideline, developed by a panel of international experts and informed by a thorough review of existing evidence, contains a number of recommendations on the use of antibiotics for neonates (0–28 days old) and young infants (0–59 days old) with PSBI in order to reduce young infant mortality rates. The guideline is intended for use in resource-limited settings in situations when families do not accept or cannot access referral care. The goal of the guideline is to provide clinical guidance on the simplest antibiotic regimens that are both safe and effective for outpatient treatment of clinical severe infections and fast breathing (pneumonia) in children 0–59 days old. In addition, the guideline seeks to provide programmatic guidance on the role of CHWs and home visits in identifying signs of serious infections in neonates and young infants.
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  2. 2
    133054

    Validation of outpatient IMCI guidelines.

    United States. Agency for International Development [USAID]. Child Health Research Project

    SYNOPSIS. 1998 Jan; (2):1-8.

    The World Health Organization (WHO)/UN Children's Fund (UNICEF) Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) guidelines were designed to maximize detection and appropriate treatment of illnesses due to the most common causes of child mortality and morbidity in developing countries: pneumonia, diarrhea, malaria, measles, bacterial infections in young infants, malnutrition, anemia, and ear problems. The health worker first examines the child and checks immunization status, then classifies the child's illness and identifies the appropriate treatment based on a color-coded triage system. By May 1997, 17 countries had introduced IMCI and 16 others were in the process of introduction. This issue reports on field tests of the guidelines conducted in Kenya, the Gambia, Uganda, Bangladesh, and Tanzania. Health workers who used the guidelines performed well when compared to physicians who had access to laboratory and radiographic findings as well as health workers trained in full case management. Of concern, however, are research findings suggesting the potential for overdiagnosis in some disease classifications. Current IMCI research priorities include the following: 1) determining health workers' ability to learn to detect lower chest wall indrawing; 2) identifying clinical signs to increase the specificity of referral for severe pneumonia; 3) identifying other clinical signs to increase the specificity of hospital referrals, thereby reducing unnecessary referrals; 4) investigating how clinical care for severely ill children could be expanded in areas where referral is not feasible; 5) finding ways to increase the specificity of the diagnosis of malaria; and 6) recognizing clinical signs to increase the specificity of the diagnosis of severe anemia and the specificity of the diagnosis of moderate or mild anemia, with the possible goal of regional adaptation of the anemia guidelines.
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  3. 3
    127897
    Peer Reviewed

    Effectiveness of clinical guidelines for the presumptive treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis in Egyptian children.

    Steinhoff MC; Abd El Khalek MK; Khallaf N; Hamza HS; El Ayadi A; Orabi A; Fouad H; Kamel M

    Lancet. 1997 Sep 27; 350(9082):918-21.

    In developing country settings without access to bacterial culture and rapid diagnostic tests, the prevention of acute rheumatic fever depends on clinicians' presumptive treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis. This study evaluated the effectiveness of World Health Organization (WHO) acute respiratory infection guidelines in a large pediatric clinic (Abu Reesh Children's Hospital) in Cairo, Egypt. 451 children 2-13 years of age with sore throat and pharyngeal erythema were enrolled, 107 (24%) of whom had group A beta-hemolytic streptococci on throat culture. Purulent exudate, present in 99 (22%) of these children, was 31% sensitive and 81% specific for a positive culture. The WHO guidelines, which recommend treatment for pharyngeal exudate plus enlarged and tender cervical node, were 12% sensitive and 94% specific. Based on these guidelines, 13 of 107 children with a positive throat culture would correctly receive antibiotics and 323 of 344 with a negative culture would not receive antibiotics. A modified guideline in which exudate or large cervical nodes would indicate antibiotic treatment would be 84% sensitive and 40% specific. With this modification, 90 of 107 children with a positive throat culture would correctly receive antibiotics and 138 out of 344 with a negative culture would not receive treatment. However, additional prospective studies from other regions of Egypt are necessary before modified guidelines are implemented.
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  4. 4
    037386

    A traditional practice that threatens health--female circumcision.

    WHO CHRONICLE. 1986; 40(1):31-6.

    A traditional practice that has attracted considerable attention in the last decade is female circumcision, the adverse effects of which are undeniable. 70 million women are estimated to be circumcised, with several thousand new operations performed each day. It is a custom that continues to be widespread only in Africa north of the equator, though mild forms of female circumcision are reported from some Asian countries. In 1979 a Seminar on Traditional Practices that Affect the Health of Women and Children was held in the Sudan. It was 1 of the 1st interregional and international efforts to exchange information on female circumcision and other traditional practices, to study their implications, and to make specific recommendations on the approach to be taken by the health services. There are 3 main types of female circumcision: circumcision proper is the mildest but also the rarest form and involves the removal only of the clitoral prepuce; excision involves the amputation of the entire clitoris and all or part of the labia minora; and infibulation, also known as Pharaonic circumcision, involves the amputation of the clitoris, the whole of the labia minora, and at least the anterior 2/3 and often the whole of the medial part of the labia majora. Initial circumcision is carried out before a girl reaches puberty. The operation generally is the responsibility of the traditional midwife, who rarely uses even a local anesthetic. She is assisted by a number of women to hold the child down, and these frequently include the child's own relatives. Most of the adverse health consequences are associated with Pharaonic circumcision. Hemorrhage and shock from the acute pain are immediate dangers of the operation, and, because it is usually performed in unhygienic circumstances, the risks of infection and tetanus are considerable. Retention of urine is common. Cases have been reported in which infibulated unmarried girls have developed swollen bellies, owing to obstruction of the menstrual flow. Implantion dermoid cysts are a very common complication. Infections of the vagina, urinary tract, and pelvis occur often. A women who has been infibulated suffers great difficulty and pain during sexual intercourse, which can be excruciating if a neuroma has formed at the point of section of the dorsal nerve of the clitoris. Consummation of marriage often necessitates the opening up of the scar. During childbirth infibulation causes a variety of serious problems including prolonged labor and obstructed delivery, with increased risk of fetal brain damage and fetal loss. A variety of reasons are advanced by its adherents for continuing to support the practice of female circumcision, but the reasons are rationalizations, and none of the reasons bear close scrutiny. The campaigning against female circumcision is reviewed.
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