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Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    310055

    From camp to community: Liberia study on exploitation of children. Discussion paper on children's vulnerability to exploitation and abuse during the delivery of assistance in Liberia based on field studies carried out by Save the Children UK in Liberia.

    Save the Children UK

    Monrovia, Liberia, Save the Children UK, 2006. 20 p.

    The people of Liberia have experienced ongoing suffering over the past two decades as a result of war and displacement. Children have been drawn into this in many ways, such as recruitment into armed forces, separation from their families, witnessing atrocities, rape and torture. Thousands have been driven from their homes into exile into neighbouring countries or camps for internally displaced people (IDPs) within Liberia. This study focuses on children remaining in those camps and those who have recently been repatriated to their towns and villages of origin after the end of the war. Save the Children, along with many other non-governmental organisations, has been working alongside the Liberian government in the IDP camps. During the course of our work with children, Save the Children staff became aware that many children were agreeing to have sex with older men for money, food and other goods and favours. In order to document more closely the circumstances surrounding this issue, and to look at ways to improve Save the Children's delivery of assistance to better protect children against such exploitation, we instigated a study in four IDP camps and four communities with a high population of people returning from the camps. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    184832

    Angola. Struggling through peace: return and resettlement in Angola.

    Marques N

    New York, New York, Human Rights Watch, 2003 Aug. [4], 29 p. (Angola Vol. 15, No. 16(A))

    This short report is based on an investigation by Human Rights Watch conducted in March and April 2003. Our researchers interviewed over fifty internally displaced persons, refugees, and former combatants in the transit centers and the camps of Bengo, Bengo II and Kituma in the province of Uíge and Cazombo in the province of Moxico. Human Rights Watch researchers conducted twenty-one interviews with concerned U.N. agencies, NGOs and other organizations, including the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), the U.N. Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the World Food Programme (WFP), Oxfam-GB, GOAL, African Humanitarian Aid (AHA), Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)-Spain, MSF-Belgium, Jesuit Refugee Service (JRS), Lutheran World Federation (LWF), International Monetary Fund (IMF), World Bank, Trocaire, Associação Justiça, Paz e Democracia (AJPD), Liga da Mulher Angolana (LIMA) and Mulheres, Paz e Desenvolvimento. Human Rights Watch researchers also interviewed Angolan central government officials and police, and conducted six interviews with local Angolan authorities in three provinces. Where necessary, the names of those interviewed are withheld or changed in this short report to protect their confidentiality. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    180155

    Trauma and resilience during war: a look at the children and humanitarian aid workers of Bosnia.

    Berk JH

    Psychoanalytic Review. 1998 Aug; 85(4):639-658.

    This article will explore some of the issues of resilience in the child population of Bosnia during the recent war there. It will also look at similar issues in the humanitarian aid workers who came from outside the country as representatives of relief agencies. I, myself, worked for UNICEF, and it was my job to train members of the local population to work with Bosnian children in an attempt to increase their resilience under intense wartime stress and to reduce the traumatic impact to those children already harmed. (author's)
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  4. 4
    159817

    AIDS prevention in the ranks.

    Fleshman M

    Africa Recovery. 2001 Jun; 15(1-2):16-8.

    The rapid spread of HIV in Africa has been linked to war, but the degree to which conflict contributes to the spread of HIV remains uncertain. A study reveals that a soldier's risk of infection doubled for each year spent in deployment in conflict regions, suggesting a direct link between duty in the war zone and HIV transmission. In this regard, the African government, together with the UN and the international community, is investigating the link between the uniformed services and AIDS while expanding education and prevention programs. Military personnel has started to acknowledge the AIDS problem and that AIDS has begun to degrade the ability of the army to accomplish its mission. As such, African countries are focusing their resources on HIV education for the military and are formulating a plan of action. A UN Department of Peacekeeping Operations policy encourages member states to offer voluntary and confidential counseling and testing (VCCT) to peacekeeping personnel. However, the obstacles to VCCT are the issues of cost and confidentiality. While the debate on testing continues, UN is expanding its education and prevention programs among civil and military members of peace missions. Furthermore, it is stressed that changing the attitudes that lead to unsafe and unacceptable behavior is important in reducing HIV.
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