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Your search found 7 Results

  1. 1
    388355

    [Knowledge, attitudes and condom use skills among youth in Burkina Faso] Utilisation du preservatif masculin : connaissances, attitudes et competences de jeunes burkinabè.

    Yelian Adohinzin CC; Meda N; Gaston Belem AM; Ouedraogo GA; Berthe A; Sombie I; Avimadjenon GD; Diallo I; Fond-Harmant L

    Sante Publique. 2017 Mar 06; 29(1):95-103.

    Introduction: Condom use is recognized by the WHO as the only contraceptive that protects against both HIV / AIDS and unwanted pregnancies. But to be effective, condoms must be used consistently and correctly. The objective of this study was to assess young people's skills in male condom used, to identify the challenges faced by them when using condoms to better guide future interventions.Methods: Based on a two-level sampling representing 94,947 households within Bobo-Dioulasso municipality, 573 youth aged between 15 and 24 were interviewed. This data collection was conducted from December 2014 to January 2015 in the three districts of the municipality. A questionnaire was used to assess the knowledge and attitudes of the youth.Results: Only 24% of surveyed know how to accurately use condoms despite their knowledge of condom effectiveness and although some of them are exposed to awareness-raising and information campaigns. Indeed, various handling errors and usage problems (breakage, slippage, leakage and loss of erection) had been identified during the oral demonstration performed by the surveyed. The older youth and with the highest level of education were the most likely to demonstrate increased skills in condom use. Moreover, girls were less competent than boys in terms of condom use.Conclusion: It is important to increase awareness-raising and information campaigns, adapting the content to the real needs of young people so as to transmit the skills required for effective prevention particularly in regard to condom use.
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  2. 2
    320298
    Peer Reviewed

    Knowledge, perceptions and attitudes of Islamic scholars towards reproductive health programs in Borno State, Nigeria.

    Mairiga AG; Kyari O; Kullima A; Abdullabi H

    African Journal of Reproductive Health. 2007; 11(1):98-106.

    Some reproductive health policies and activities of international development organizations continued to be criticized by some religious groups. Such criticisms can be serious obstacles in the provision of reproductive health and rights information and services in many communities. This study was conducted to find the knowledge, perception and attitude of Islamic scholars on reproductive health programs and to get some suggestions on the scholars' role in the planning and implementation of reproductive health advocacy and programming. The data were collected by in-depth interview with representative sample of selected Muslim scholars in and around Maiduguri town in Borno State, Nigeria. All the scholars had vague or no idea of what reproductive health is all about. When they were explaining reproductive health, most of the scholars mentioned some of the rights of women especially the need for maintaining the good health of women and their children as reproductive health. Even though they have poorknowledge, all the Muslim scholars interviewed believed that reproductive health is an essential component of healthy living and the programs of the international development organizations are mostly good, but they have reservations and concern to certain campaigns and programs. Scholars that promised their contributions in enhancing reproductive health have a common condition for their continuous support to any international development organization or reproductive health program. Conformity to Islamic norms and principles are prerequisites to their loyalties. The scholars also advised the international development organizations on the need to identify themselves clearly, so that people know from where they are coming, what are their background, and the program that they want to do and the reasons for doing the program in the community. (author's)
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  3. 3
    093063

    Evaluation of the Chogoria family planning default tracking system.

    Chogoria Hospital; Population Council

    In: Operations research family planning database project summaries, [compiled by] Population Council. New York, New York, Population Council, 1993 Mar. [1] p. (KEN-13)

    For the past 20 years, Chogoria Hospital has run a steadily expanding clinic and community-based health service program in Meru District. This hospital, with its 32 satellite clinics and its catchment area, has been renowned for its high contraceptive prevalence and low fertility rate compared to the Kenyan national average and that of many sub-Saharan countries. Several factors have contributed to this success, including community-based distribution by family health educators (FHEs) and community health workers (CHWs). Through these community-based distributors, family planning (FP), child welfare, and antenatal clients who fail to turn up for appointments within a month after the default date are followed-up and encouraged to visit a clinic. Financial support for this default tracking system has been ensured through donor funds. Lately, however, the longterm sustainability and usefulness of the tracking system have been questioned. In response to this concern, the management at Chogoria Hospital asked The Population Council to evaluate the default tracking system. This study, which cost US $15,080, determined the extent to which the default tracking system is effective in identifying, tracking, and bringing defaulters back to the program. In addition, the cost of tracking down and bringing back a client was determined. A third component involved assessing the attitude of clients towards this activity and their consequent behavior when they visit Chogoria or other clinics. Data were collected from interviews with 654 defaulting clients using a general questionnaire and 3 other ones specific to FP, child welfare, and antenatal issues. 4 teams composed of local school teachers, with heads of schools acting as supervisors, identified and interviewed the defaulters over a period of 13 days. The teams, who had substantial previous experience in interviewing and data collection, received a week-long training session which included 2 days of fieldwork. A different questionnaire was used to collect information from CHWs. These data were supplemented by information received from field team observations. True defaulters were few, and the impact of CHWs and FHEs in bringing back these clients was low (11-17%). The benefits derived from bringing back a defaulter were negligible compared to the high cost of deploying the CHWs and FHEs. As a result, it was recommended that the default tracking system be discontinued. In addition, it was suggested that the CHWs and FHEs be supervised more effectively and that they concentrate their efforts on other community health activities such as primary health care counseling.
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  4. 4
    126428

    Interview schedule for Knowledge, Attitudes, Beliefs and Practices on AIDS. Phase I: African countries. A. Household form. B. Community characteristics. C. Individual questionnaire.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Global Programme on AIDS. Social and Behavioural Research Unit

    [Unpublished] 1989 Feb. 28 p.

    The household interview form has spaces in which to designate a household's location and track interviewer visits with notation of visit results. Basic information can be recorded about the people over age 10 years who usually live in the household or who slept in the household on the preceding night. Data are then taken on the community characteristics form on the type of locality, travel time to the nearest large town, and facilities available in the community. The individual questionnaire is for people aged 15-64 years who slept in the household on the preceding night and is comprised of the following sections: identification; individual characteristics; awareness of AIDS; knowledge on AIDS; sources of information; beliefs, attitudes, and behavior; knowledge of and attitudes toward condoms; sexual practices; injection practices; locus of control; IV drug use; and drinking habits.
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  5. 5
    083446
    Peer Reviewed

    ORS and the treatment of childhood diarrhea in Managua, Nicaragua.

    Hudelson PM

    Social Science and Medicine. 1993 Jul; 37(1):97-103.

    Dehydration from diarrheal disease is the leading cause of infant and child mortality in many developing countries. World Health Organization (WHO) policy recommends oral rehydration solution (ORS) for its treatment and prevention. In concordance with this recommendation, many community-based oral rehydration therapy programs have been implemented since the late 1960s, making ORS widely available and affordable. The solution, however, has not been incorporated universally where needed into people's health-seeking practices. A study was conducted on the household management of childhood diarrhea in a poor, urban neighborhood of Managua, Nicaragua, over the period February 1987 - April, 1988. Results are based upon data collected from interviews with 8 key informants and 109 mothers, and 44 reported cases of diarrhea. Despite the provision of ORS by state health facilities, pharmacies, and informal drug vendors, and health education efforts to change mothers' beliefs and practices, the appropriate use of ORS was not common in the household management of diarrhea. Mothers knew about dehydration and diarrhea, but their explanatory models and actual practice reflected heavy reliance upon self-prescribed pharmaceuticals and home remedies; ORS use was associated with clinic attendance. These findings underscore the existing obstacles to changing people's explanatory models for illness and illness management. To best effect positive, healthy change, the context in which treatment options are assessed and used must be understood.
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  6. 6
    081055

    Epidemiological studies on measles in Karachi, Pakistan -- mothers' knowledge, attitude and beliefs about measles and measles vaccine.

    Isomura S; Ahmed A; Dure-Samin A; Mubina A; Takasu T

    ACTA PAEDIATRICA JAPONICA. 1992 Jun; 34(3):290-4.

    In Pakistan, the Accelerated Health Program has greatly improved the immunization coverage rates, and local area monitoring revealed a marked decrease of measles between 1974 and 1984. In October 1988, 287 randomly selected mothers living in Karachi who took their children to the Civil Hospital or to the Abbasi Shahid Civil Hospital were interviewed by means of a questionnaire about their knowledge of the clinical manifestations of measles, their own children's history of morbidity and mortality, and any history of immunizations, and attitude and beliefs about measles and measles vaccine. In 1989 and 1990, in a community-based survey visits were conducted in Neelam Colony, Karachi, with a population of about 3000, and infantile mortality rate of 153/1000 births, and an immunization acceptance rate up to 1 year of age of about 35%. More than half of the women mentioned serious complications of measles, including diarrhea and malnutrition. Of 1076 children whose parents gave usable answers, only a few had repeated episodes of measles. The age of contraction of measles varied widely from 4 months to 12 years with high prevalence: 89% of them contracted it before 6 years of age, primarily between 9 and 18 months of age. The vaccine efficacy rate was 72%. The severity of the illness and complications were well known and immunizations were appreciated. In traditional families, grandparents had made the decision about immunization, but many mothers were starting to assume that responsibility. The vaccine acceptance rate had increased sharply in recent years, as a result of local health educators' activities in clinics providing regular health checks and especially owing to TV programs. The importance of promotion of primary heath care by collaboration of motivated mothers and community health workers is emphasized.
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  7. 7
    071357

    Patterns of fertility behaviour among female students at the University of Zambia.

    Munachonga M; Johnston T

    In: African research studies in population information, education and communication, compiled and edited by Tony Johnston, Aart de Zeeuw, and Waithira Gikonyo. Nairobi, Kenya, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 1991. 83-100.

    Researchers studied 62 pregnant women intending to not terminate their pregnancy and to continue their studies and 27 nonpregnant women to learn about female student fertility related behavior. They were all enrolled at the University of Zambia either during the 1987-1988 or 1989-1990 academic years. Methodology consisted of interviews, questionnaires, and focus group discussions. 68% of all women were single with 40% of them having at least 1 child. 75% of the women were sexually active. 42.7% knew traditional family planning methods with friends, grandmothers, and social aunts telling 25.9% of all the women about such methods. Yet mass media provided most women (49.4%) with knowledge about modern methods. 50.6% thought the pill to be the most effective method. >65% considered the 24-26 as the ideal age at marriage. The mean ideal family size was 3.5, somewhat less than family size for urban women in Zambia. 71.9% considered children to be assets since children are a means to social security (33%), self fulfillment (8%), and companionship (7%). 94.4% approved of family planning mainly for purposes of child spacing (29.2%), limiting (23.6), and spacing and limiting (32.6%). Even though they knew about and approved of family planning and claimed modern attitudes concerning ideal age at marriage and ideal family size, 62% of single pregnant students and 59% of married pregnant students did not use or regularly use contraception. This suggested that they considered early childbearing to be an asset. The leading reasons for contraception nonuse included perception of low pregnancy risk (40%) and desire for a child (28%). Only 3.2% claimed method failure. 64% of all women said partners did not approve of contraceptive use. Access to family planning and cost were not a problem. Only 22% of pregnant students said pregnancy would reduce their chances of marriage. In conclusion, many women became pregnant surreptitiously.
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