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Your search found 12 Results

  1. 1
    060439

    [Stop AIDS: a prevention campaign] Stop SIDA: une campagne de prevention.

    Aide Suisse contre le SIDA; Switzerland. Office Federal de la Sante Publique

    [Berne], Switzerland, Aide Suisse contre le SIDA, 1988 Apr. [15] p. (Documentation 1)

    This document contains 12 brief and nontechnical articles by experts on different aspects of AIDS diagnosis and control. The 1st 3 articles, on AIDS information and communications, include a discussion of the international exchange of information on AIDS, an outline of worldwide activities of the World Health Organization Special Program Against AIDS, and a discussion of information policy on AIDS. The next several articles, on AIDS transmission, include articles explaining why mosquitoes do not transmit AIDS and why AIDS is not spread by kissing. An article calls for fighting AIDS instead of using it as a vehicle for social control or discrimination against marginal groups. 3 others call for greater understanding and compassion rather than fear in dealing with AIDS patients. A more detailed article on means of contamination and the unlikelihood of infection through casual contact is followed by a work suggesting that screening for HIV be limited primarily to blood donors and individuals with symptoms suggesting HIV infection. The final article analyzes why Switzerland has the highest per capita prevalence of AIDS in Europe and explores the epidemiology of AIDS in Switzerland.
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  2. 2
    102147

    Partnerships with young people: our hopes for the future.

    Kuti R

    [Unpublished] 1993. Presented at the 8th International Conference on AIDS and African Congress on Sexually Transmitted Diseases in Africa, Marrakech, Morocco, December 16, 1993. [4] p.

    New national and community structures must be developed to ensure that the concerns and problems of young people are heard and that their potential as a resource rather than as a problem are fully realized. This conclusion can easily be reached after reviewing concerns voiced by an international group of young people from African countries convened by UNICEF and the World Health Organization to describe the needs and problems of youth in health and development and what can be done about them. The following insights were offered by the youths: there is widespread ignorance of AIDS in rural areas, among young people, and especially among homeless street children; there is an overwhelming lack of access to information about sexuality, misinformation on the subject, and a lack of communication with parents about sex, HIV, and AIDS; youths learn from peers and experience considerable peer pressure; they are worried about teen pregnancy and cultural practices which force young women to have sex with older men; homosexuality is practiced in schools, but often denied or not acknowledged; youths fear the violence of the military killing them and of men raping women; and they complained about negative images and messages in the international media, political corruption, an inadequate educational system, a discriminatory health system, social and religious taboos against seeking STD and family planning services, and the lack of confidence given to their ability to behave responsibly and contribute to the development of society. The youths recommend that young people be involved in making policy and implementing programs to rectify these problems. They call for government and donor agencies to fund youth initiatives, confront poverty, and in collaboration with nongovernmental organizations, youth clubs, and social workers solve the plight of street children. Family life education programs should be organized by youth and targeted at youth; sex and health education programs should be integrated at all educational levels; youths infected with HIV and people with AIDS should be counselled and cared for by their peers; adults who feel comfortable talking to youth should be identified and trained to deal with matters relating to sexuality among youth; many young people should be trained as peer educators; communication between parents and children should be improved through the development of proper communication skills in the appropriate fora; teachers and health workers should be trained to have warm and welcoming attitudes, and to listen nonjudgementally to young people; and religious leaders should be mobilized to discuss sexuality with young people, hopefully advocating condom use.
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  3. 3
    081055

    Epidemiological studies on measles in Karachi, Pakistan -- mothers' knowledge, attitude and beliefs about measles and measles vaccine.

    Isomura S; Ahmed A; Dure-Samin A; Mubina A; Takasu T

    ACTA PAEDIATRICA JAPONICA. 1992 Jun; 34(3):290-4.

    In Pakistan, the Accelerated Health Program has greatly improved the immunization coverage rates, and local area monitoring revealed a marked decrease of measles between 1974 and 1984. In October 1988, 287 randomly selected mothers living in Karachi who took their children to the Civil Hospital or to the Abbasi Shahid Civil Hospital were interviewed by means of a questionnaire about their knowledge of the clinical manifestations of measles, their own children's history of morbidity and mortality, and any history of immunizations, and attitude and beliefs about measles and measles vaccine. In 1989 and 1990, in a community-based survey visits were conducted in Neelam Colony, Karachi, with a population of about 3000, and infantile mortality rate of 153/1000 births, and an immunization acceptance rate up to 1 year of age of about 35%. More than half of the women mentioned serious complications of measles, including diarrhea and malnutrition. Of 1076 children whose parents gave usable answers, only a few had repeated episodes of measles. The age of contraction of measles varied widely from 4 months to 12 years with high prevalence: 89% of them contracted it before 6 years of age, primarily between 9 and 18 months of age. The vaccine efficacy rate was 72%. The severity of the illness and complications were well known and immunizations were appreciated. In traditional families, grandparents had made the decision about immunization, but many mothers were starting to assume that responsibility. The vaccine acceptance rate had increased sharply in recent years, as a result of local health educators' activities in clinics providing regular health checks and especially owing to TV programs. The importance of promotion of primary heath care by collaboration of motivated mothers and community health workers is emphasized.
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  4. 4
    069355

    Adolescence education. Social aspects. Module two.

    UNESCO. Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific

    Bangkok, Thailand, Unesco Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific, 1991. [2], 73 p. (Population Education Programme Service)

    The revised UNESCO secondary school teaching manual provides lessons on family life education. Materials are based on the those available from the Population Education Clearing House. 4 Modules cover various aspects of adolescence education: Module 1, Physical Aspects; Module 2, Social Aspects; Module 3, Sex Roles; and Module 4, Sexually Transmitted Diseases. This report on the Social Aspects begins with a general discussion of the program and conceptual framework for the adolescence education package. 6 lessons are included in this module. Lesson 2.1 is devoted to adolescent sexuality or sexual behavior. Each lesson has a set of objectives, time required, and materials, and usually has procedures, information sheet, and suggested activities outlines. Lesson 2.2 is concerned with sexuality in childhood and adolescence. Lesson 2.3 deals with love. Lesson 2.4 consists of dating and relationships. Lesson 2.5 provides information on adolescent pregnancy in terms of the growing number and the consequences of adolescent pregnancy and parenting in the premarital and marital states. The other objective is to explore individual feelings and attitudes about adolescent pregnancy and sexual behavior. Lesson 2.6 is on a moral code of ethics, their roles and function. An example of the information sheet on love is as follows: several paragraphs describe various aspects of love as sharing, caring, action, time and sacrifice, not always agreement, a relationship, the glue to hold families together, and so on. There are different types of love: love for parents, love among siblings, love for friends, conjugal love. Mature love is differentiated from immature love by the degree of caring about the other person as more important to you than having the other person care for you. Immature love is the reverse where one is more concerned with having the other person care about you and involves more taking than giving. Communication is sometimes blocked in order to avoid hurting the other's feelings, is directed to another instead of directly to one's partner, or is misdirected to a small action instead of focusing on the larger concern. Partners must conscientiously work on getting through to each other. Spontaneity and mutual confidence will develop as each becomes more comfortable with the other.
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  5. 5
    064978

    Consensus statement from the Consultation on AIDS and Seafarers, Geneva, 5-6 October 1989.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Global Programme on AIDS; International Labour Office [ILO]

    [Unpublished] 1989. [4] p. (WHO/GPA/INF/89.21)

    In October 1989, WHO and the International Labour Office (ILO) organized a consultation on AIDS and seafarers. Participants included shipowners, public health professionals, physicians, seafarer organizations, and government representatives. They concluded that seafarers were not at particular risk since they work and live basically on ships for extended periods of time. Nevertheless conditions do exist that warrant special attention. For example, they are a geographically mobile young population living and working in a mixed cultural environment. This environment restricts their accessibility to health facilities and timely information and HIV and AIDS. Further, the nature of their profession limits social interaction on board ship and on shore. Therefore the consultation stated aims and objectives to help prevent HIV transmission and to promote the health of HIV positive seafarers on the job. Shipping owners and seafarer organizations should develop strategies together, and where appropriate, with governmental and other agencies to achieve these goals. The consultation recommended that WHO and ILO provide guidance AIDS health promotion, encourage its integration into overall health promotion, and support any regional pilot projects on AIDS health promotion. They should also establish a resource center and a network to disseminate resource packages with culturally sensitive material, such as video tapes and posters. In addition, these international organizations should reexamine current occupational health and safety regulations and medical guides for ships and the manner in which they are applied. Accordingly they should develop a seafarer's manual for physician use. WHO and ILO should widely distribute the consultation statement to relevant organizations. Finally, they should encourage national AIDS committees to tie in with individuals working on HIV/AIDS issues for seafarers.
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  6. 6
    271600

    A unique collaboration in Chile.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. AIDS Prevention Unit; League of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

    AIDS WATCH. 1989; (8):8.

    The Chilean Red Cross Society and the family planning association--APROFA, International Planned Parenthood Federation's affiliate, are joining forces to help prevent the spread of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. APROFA established a working group to study the knowledge, attitudes, and sexual behavior of students at the National Training Institute, INACAP. 7000 students were sampled in 11 Chilean cities. The study found that 36% of the females, and 77% of males were sexually active before the age of 20. Nearly 1/2 of the women and 1/5 of the men did not know that condoms could protect them against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and pregnancy. APROFA designed a program to increase students knowledge of AIDS, reduce promiscuity and increase knowledge of and use of condoms. In October, 1988 an educational package distributed, consisting of a training manual, slides, educational booklets, a poster, and a video of 3 films. It has proved so successful that APROFA has adapted it for community groups, educational institutions, and its youth program. APROFA/Red Cross nurses and Red Cross volunteers have participated in workshops and training with the package. The Red Cross has organized AIDS-related activities in Chile since 1986, including education campaigns, information for blood donors, and a telephone hotline to provide AIDS counseling. Goals are to target more poor areas and groups outside of society's mainstream in the next year for sex education and information on STDs.
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  7. 7
    052132

    [Breastfeeding in developing countries -- our challenge] Amning i U-land -- var utmaning.

    JORDEMODERN. 1987 Jun; 100(6):172-3.

    As long as breast-feeding in the developing and developed countries is threatened by bottle-feeding and too early introduction of supplementary diets, the discussion about how breast-feeding is best protected must be kept alive within the organizations and the mass media. Representatives of the Swedish private organizations' foreign assistance programs participated in a seminar on April 3, 1987 in Stockholm, arranged by the Nordic Work Group for International Breast-Feeding Questions in cooperation with International Child Health (ICH). Breast-feeding increased strongly in Sweden during the 1970s, but bottle-feeding is still the norm in large parts of Europe and continues to increase in the developing countries. 6 years have passed since the international code for marketing of breast milk substitutes (even called the child food code) was approved by WHO, in 1981. It contains rules that limit companies' marketing efforts and establish responsibilities and duties that apply to health personnel. The application of these rules is slow and differences between company policies and practice exist. In a larger perspective, we are dealing with the position and significance of woman and children within the family and society. During a WHO meeting in 1986, a resolution was adopted that reinforces the content of the code, e.g., it stops the distribution of free breast milk substitutes to the hospital, where free samples are often given to leaving mothers. The WHO countries also expressed negative feeling toward marketing child food during a period where breast-feeding may be affected negatively. How the resolution is going to be implemented in Sweden is not yet known. There are signs that even in Sweden the existence of the code is being forgotten. The seminar participants recommended that the Social Board issue a simplified and easily read reminder about the code for wider distribution in Sweden.
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  8. 8
    042029

    [The Church, the Family and Responsible Parenthood in Latin America: a Meeting of experts] Iglesia, Familia y Paternidad Responsable en America Latina: Encuentro de Expertos.

    Consejo Episcopal Latinoamericano [CELAM]

    Bogota, Colombia, CELAM, 1977. (Documento CELAM No. 32.)

    This document is the result of a meeting organized by the Department of the Laity of the Latin American Episcopal Council on the theme of the Church, Family, and Responsible Parenthood. 18 Latin American experts in various disciplines were selected on the basis of professional competence and the correctness of their philosophical and theological positions in the eyes of the Catholic Church to study the problem of responsible parenthood in Latin America and to recommend lines of action for a true family ministry in this area. The work consists of 2 major parts: 12 presentations concerning the sociodemographic, philosophical-theological, psychophysiological, and educational aspects of responsible parenthood, and conclusions based on the work and the meetings. The 4 articles on sociodemographic aspects discuss the demographic problem in Latin America, Latin America and the demographic question in the Conference of Bucharest, maturity of faith in Christ expressed in responsible parenthood, and social conditions of responsible parenthood in Peruvian squatter settlements. The 3 articles on philosophical and theological aspects concern conceptual foundations of neomalthusian theory, pastoral attitudes in relation to responsible parenthood, and pastoral action regarding responsible parenthood. 2 articles on psychophysiological aspects discuss the couple and methods of fertility regulation and the gynecologist as an advisor on psychosexual problems of reproduction. Educational aspects are discussed in 3 articles on sexual pathology and education, education for responsible parenthood, and the Misereor-Carvajal Program of Family Action in Cali, Colombia. The conclusions are the result of an interdisciplinary effort to synthesize the major points of discussion and agreements on principles and actions arrived at in each of the 4 areas.
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  9. 9
    029096

    Freedom to choose: the life and work of Dr. Helena Wright, pioneer of contraception

    Evans B

    London, England, Bodley Head, 1984. 286 p.

    This biography of the British family planning pioneer Helena Wright, who lived from 1887-1981, is based on her books, letters, and papers and on a series of personal interviews, as well as on the recollections and writings of her friends, colleagues, and critics. Considerable attention was given to her background and early life because of their strong influence on her later works and attitudes. Wright was the only physician among the small group of women who founded the British Family Planning Association, and was a founder and officeholder of the International Planned Parenthood Federation. She helped gain acceptance of the principle of contraception from the Anglican clergy and the medical establishment, and was an early worker in the field of sex education and sex therapy. Among Wright's books were works on sexual function in marriage, sex education for young people, contraceptive methods for lay persons and for medical practitioners, and sexual behavior and social mores. This biography also contains extensive material on the history of contraception and of the birth control movement, including the development of the British Family Planning Association and the International Planned Parenthood Federation, as well as important early figures in the movement.
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  10. 10
    265897

    Notes on activities in the field of population.

    Jimlar Mutane. 1976 Feb; 1(1):191-202.

    The Committee for International Coordination of National Research (CICRED), formed by the UN in 1971, commissioned a number of national monographs on "Past, Present and Future Trends of Population" for African countries. A report on the UN programs of demographic training in Africa pinpoints governments, universities, and the UN as sponsors and centers for demographic training and education. The UN's program, in cooperation with African governments, the Economic Commission for Africa, the Conference of African Statisticians, and the Conference of African Planners, established statistical training centers at middle, intermediate, and high levels of competence in demographic statistics. Demographic teaching in UN sponsored demographic units in African universities provides for teaching and research programs. The Cairo Demographic Center has carried out a number of research projects which have helped in understanding demographic trends in the area it serves. It has established a program for team research, selecting different demographic topics for different years, and awarding fellowships for trainees. The Regional Institute for Population Studies in Ghana, the Institut de Formation et de Recherche Demographiques in the Republic of Cameroon, and the Cairo Demographic Center follow the same model with training in: substantive and technical demography; and ancillary subjects such as mathematics, statistics, sampling, survey and research methodology, sociology, economic development planning, genetics, and physiology of reproduction. The centers plan to provide field experiences to students by jointly sponsoring ad hoc demographic surveys in the host countries. Coordinators among different UN agencies meet annually to coordinate training activities. A survey of women from the Republic of Cameroon showed that women desire population growth; their ideal family size is 6; they desire family planning information; they want sex education taught in post primary institutions; they prefer polygamy; their ideal age of marriage is 18.
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  11. 11
    266148

    Community participation in improving environmental situation--a case study of Panchkhal. Part II.

    Upadhya DP

    Joicfp Review. 1983 Spring; (6):25-31.

    During 1980, the Integrated Family Planning and Parasite Control Project initiated the construction of 5 low-cost toilets in the rural Panchkhal Project area of Nepal for demonstration purposes on a subsidy basis. On recommendation from the members of the cooperation committee, these toilets were constructed within school premises located in different Village Panchayats. The overall strategy adopted during the parasite control program was to generate community participation in latrine construction. In the fiscal year 1981, 30 more subsidized sanitary toilets were built in the pilot area. With a view to determine how many families would be interested in constructing sanitary toilets on a subsidy basis towards the later part of 1981, the Project invited applications from the people of the pilot area. This was done to check people's attitudes towards the program. The response was encouraging. By the end of 1981, there were 300 applications; interest would have increased if the Project could aid all of the potential applicants. UNICEF has been involved in latrine construction by granting money and aiding in latrine design. The Panchkhal experience shows that community people are prepared to spend as much as 75% of the building costs for constructing sanitary toilets, when they are convinced that their health will improve as a result. Those who can afford the toilets will pay Nepal Rs25 (about US$1.90); those who cannot pay cash will provide labor to make the cement slabs. The very poor sector of the community, upon recommendation of members of the cooperation committees, may be given squatting slabs free of charge, if they are interested in constructing latrines. Constraints to the program include: difficult geography for constructing latrines; deforestation and dried-up wells; high illiteracy; lack of higher education facilities; and lack of appropriate technology. Recommendations call for distribution of materials at a nominal charge; casting the slabs over the household pits in difficult terrains; health education to motivate the community to adopt preventive measures against malnutrition and infection; and community organization for community participation. A field questionnairre and survey results obtained in 1982 are appended to the summary.
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  12. 12
    018106

    Women as providers of health care.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Division of Health Manpower Development

    Who Chronicle. 1983; 37(4):134-8.

    Societies depend heavily on women for health care, yet women's own health needs are frequently neglected, their contributions to health development undervalued, and their working conditions ignored. The increasing recognition of the need for universally accessible primary health care and of people's right and duty to participate individually and collectively in their own care makes it vital to critically examine the role and status of women in its provision. A question which arises is whether the low status and prestige accorded to primary health stems from the fact that it is primarily women who provided it, or, rather, are women the main providers of such care because it is still regarded as unprestigious work and therefore to be left largely to women. Whatever the answer, the status and prestige of primary health care and the workers who provide it must be raised. To help address the problems and devise some solutions, the World Health Organization (WHO) convened consultations in 1980 and 1982. At the 1st consultation, priority issues concerning women as health care providers were identified and suggestions made for case studies and on analyses on specific issues. These were to be carried out in 17 developing and developed countries. The 2nd consultation brought together policy analysts and decision makers from the countries concerned who examined the findings and proposed concrete activities at the international and the national level. It became clear that any comprehensive strategy designed to raise the status of women who provide health care and make their workload less onerous must focus on the following elements: educational and training; attitudes about women; health education; policies and opportunities for employment; support systems; and infrastructure development. These elements are discussed separately here, yet it should be remembered that the participants in the consultation continually stressed their interdependence. Education of women for health work must be seen in the context of the type and length of the general education that they receive. The recruitment of women to training programs will require special efforts. Once women's self-esteem increases they are likely to receive more respect and consideration from men. To acquire this self-esteem, women must organize and support each other. Changes are called for in the attitudes towards each other of health care providers working in the formal and nonformal sectors. To provide health education for women is to train health educators for the community. Every plan for national development must include employment policies and strategies for their implementation.
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