Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 3 Results

  1. 1
    099808

    Despite moral dilemmas at the heart of the ICPD, "consensus" is achieved.

    FAMILY PLANNING NEWS. 1994; 10(2):5.

    Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto of Pakistan, while noting her desire for all pregnancies to one day be planned and all children loved, publicly rejected abortion at the 1994 UN International Conference on Population and Development as a method of family planning. She stressed that serious flaws exist in the draft program of action and reaffirmed the Islamic principle of the sanctity of life and the emphasis of the family unit. Pakistan will be guided in its policies by the laws of Islam even though family planning is now being encouraged in the country. Norway's Prime Minister Gro Brundtland, a practicing doctor for 10 years, however, was more realistic on abortion. Women abort unwanted fetuses the world over through whatever means available and regardless of the legality of the procedure. Antiabortion legislation makes many of these abortions highly unsafe for the pregnant women. Prime Minister Brundtland called upon the leaders of all countries to provide legal and safe abortion services to women in need. After abortion became legal in Norway, the number of abortions remained the same and the country now has one of the lowest such rates in the world. Contrary to the claims of conservative and uninformed detractors in some countries, sex education does not promote promiscuity, but helps reduce levels of fertility. Brundtland pointed to the successes of programs in Thailand, Indonesia, and Italy as evidence. In Norway, sex education also promotes responsible sexual behavior and even abstinence. Finally, Prime Minister Brundtland encouraged governments to allocate much more of their budgets to family planning programs. Norway in 1991 allocated 4.55% of its official development assistance to family planning, the only country to surpass the 4% level in this area.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    071749

    From abortion to contraception in Romania.

    Pierotti D

    WORLD HEALTH. 1991 Nov-Dec; 22.

    The experiences of Romania show that legal decrees will not deter a woman determined to end her pregnancy, and that it is easier to switch from illegal to legal abortion than it is to introduce the practice of modern contraception. On Christmas Day 1989, Romania abrogated a 1966 that banned abortion and all modern contraceptive methods. Through the 1966 law, the former regime had hoped to raise the birth rate, which at the time stood at 15.6/1000. Succeeding briefly, the law ultimately failed to its objective, since by 1985 the birth rate had fallen to the initial 1966 level. If year following the abrogation of the decree, 992,265 abortions were carried out, 92% of them legally. The number of abortions is expected to top 1 million in 1991. Maternal death due to abortion has fallen by more than 60%. Romania has also witnessed the establishment of the Society for Education in Contraception, a private family planning association. UN and donor assistance has begun to arrive in Romania. 20,000 women attended family planning clinics in 1990, a figure that increased to nearly 50,000 in 1991. Nonetheless, the case of Romania illustrates the complexities involved in introducing the practice of modern contraception. In addition to commitment from national authorities, setting up a program of modern contraception will require the following: convincing physicians and clients as to the superiority of contraception over abortion; ensuring the training of health professionals; developing public information programs; creating acceptable conditions for women to seek services; and making contraceptives available and affordable. In order to facilitate the transition from abortion to contraception, UNFPA and the WHO have initiated an emergency family planning program.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    068561

    A major challenge. Entrepreneurship characterizes the work of the Soviet Family Health Association.

    Manuilova IA

    INTEGRATION. 1991 Sep; (29):4-5.

    The work of the Soviet Family Health Association (SFHA) is described. Created in January, 1989, the organization boasts 25 state-paid workers, and as of June 1991, membership of 15,000 corporate and individual members. Individual annual membership fee is 5 rubles, and entitles members to counseling and family planning (FP) services. The SFHA works in cooperation with the Commission on Family Planning Problems of the USSR's Academy of Sciences, and has been a member of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) since 1990. Association activities include lectures for students, newly-weds, adolescents, and working women on modern contraceptive methods; research on attitude regarding sex, sex behaviors, and the perceived need for effective contraception; clinical trials of contraceptive suitability for women; and the training of doctors in FP and contraceptives. Problems central to the SFHA's operations include insufficient service and examination equipment, a shortage of hard currency, and the small number of FP specialists in the country. Solutions to these obstacles are sought through collaboration with the government, non-governmental organizations in the Soviet Union, and international groups. The SFHA has a series of activities planned for 1991 designed to foster wider acceptance of FP. Increased FP services at industrial enterprises, establishing more FP centers throughout the Soviet Union, and studying FP programs in other countries are among Association targets for the year. Research on and promotion of contraceptives has been virtually stagnant since abortion was declared illegal in 1936. Catching up on these lost decades and remaining self-reliant are challenges to the SPHA.
    Add to my documents.