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Your search found 2 Results

  1. 1
    187995
    Peer Reviewed

    Willingness to pay for AIDS treatment: myths and realities.

    Binswanger HP

    Lancet. 2003 Oct 4; 362(9390):1152-1153.

    By AIDS day 2002, HIV/AIDS in Africa had killed 20.4 million and infected 29.4 million people. This number of deaths is seven times that in the Nazi holocaust, and it approaches the death toll associated with transatlantic slave trading. Treatment for AIDS includes monitoring of disease progression, psychosocial support, provision of adequate nutrition, teaching healthy living and survival skills, prophylaxis and treatment of opportunistic infections, and antiretroviral treatment. Such holistic treatment can now be provided at an all-inclusive cost of about US$600 dollars per year. Yet most African countries and donors still judge this amount to be too costly. The cost of not treating a person with AIDS includes the loss of output of each patient; loss of income of care-givers; cost of treatment in homes, clinics, and hospitals; funeral costs; death and survivor benefits; and the cost of orphan care and support. These costs are met by patients, families, employers, governments, and society at large. On economic grounds alone treatment should be provided for all those for whom the present value of expenses exceeds the cost of not giving treatment. Results of several studies show that this situation is now true for many classes of people and workers. The issue has become not whether we can afford to treat, but whether we can afford not to. Here, I review imagined obstacles and faulty arguments against large-scale treatment programmes, and show that unwillingness to pay is the main reason for inaction. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    174220
    Peer Reviewed

    Coalition aims to boost uptake of antiretroviral drugs.

    Kapp C

    Lancet. 2002 Dec 21-28; 360(9350):2051.

    WHO, UNAIDS, and the World Bank joined with advocacy groups on Dec 12 to launch the International HIV Treatment Access Coalition, designed to increase global uptake of antiretrovirals. The coalition’s primary aim is not to raise money for the drugs—the Global Fund is supposed to do that—but to pool expertise, provide backup to national treatment programmes, and scale up community and family-based networks to administer antiretroviral therapy (ART). (excerpt)
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